Posted on

Gemma Skirt & Blouse {All The Skirts: Violette Field Threads & Raspberry Creek Fabrics}

Gemma Skirt and Blouse sewn by Skirt Fixation in Cotton + Steel fabrics

Gemma Skirt and Blouse sewn by Skirt Fixation in Cotton + Steel fabrics

The Gemma Skirt and Blouse pattern is the next skirt pattern in our series All The Skirts: Violette Field Threads & Raspberry Creek Fabrics.  The pattern is described as a sweet collared blouse and circle skirt set, and that just about sums it up!

Gemma Skirt and Blouse sewn by Skirt Fixation in Cotton + Steel fabrics

The Gemma Skirt and Blouse pattern comes in 7 sizes from 2T to 9/10.  The skirt is great for a beginning seamstress, and the blouse for an adventurous beginner.  Even though there are buttons and button holes, there isn’t a button placket, so that simplifies things.

Gemma Skirt and Blouse sewn by Skirt Fixation in Cotton + Steel fabrics

The bubble pockets on the skirt create such a cute added accent to the skirt.

Gemma Skirt and Blouse sewn by Skirt Fixation in Cotton + Steel fabrics

The wide waistband is curved in the front and fitted with elastic across the back making it not only an easy sew, but easier for the child to slip off and on!

Gemma Skirt and Blouse sewn by Skirt Fixation in Cotton + Steel fabrics

Woven fabrics are recommended for the Gemma Skirt and Blouse pattern.  We chose to use Cotton + Steel fabric from Raspberry Creek Fabrics for the skirt and matching collar and cuffs.  The darling little gold dots are metallic and shine and sparkle when Annie twirls in this skirt!

Gemma Skirt and Blouse sewn by Skirt Fixation in Cotton + Steel fabrics

The blouse fabric is a silk blend from our stash.  It is fully lined with a baby pink linen.  The red buttons down the front echo the red dots on the skirt, cuffs and collar and make a POP statement just right for this outfit.   The contrast red fabric on the skirt waistband and pockets is also a silk blend, again from the stash.

Gemma Skirt and Blouse sewn by Skirt Fixation in Cotton + Steel fabrics

The blouse has darling cuffs and a collar.  It also comes with the option of flutter sleeves.  It is fully lined, so we took the opportunity to add a few steps and make it fully reversible!  Tutorial coming tomorrow.

Gemma Skirt and Blouse sewn by Skirt Fixation in Cotton + Steel fabrics

We really can’t say enough about Raspberry Creek Fabric’s fast shipping and friendly customer service!  Confession: the first skirt we had planned to sew was the Ellie tulle skirt, but we ended up having color matching issues (with the local fabric source) so in the midst of it all, the package from Raspberry Creek Fabrics arrived with the fabric for the Penelope Skirt pattern, so we whipped that skirt out first!

Gemma Skirt and Blouse sewn by Skirt Fixation in Cotton + Steel fabrics

We are completely smitten with the little details on the Gemma Skirt and Blouse pattern, like the ones we mentioned above and the gathers at the top and bottom of the sleeves.

Gemma Skirt and Blouse sewn by Skirt Fixation in Cotton + Steel fabrics

Annie just adores this circle skirt due to the twirl factor!  This skirt is seriously a whole circle, so it really twirls BIG twirls!  And pockets.

Gemma Skirt and Blouse sewn by Skirt Fixation in Cotton + Steel fabrics

We’re so delighted to see so many people getting involved with this edition of All The Skirts. Have you linked up your entry yet? How about the Rafflecopter giveaway?  Do so below…

a Rafflecopter giveaway


Come back tomorrow to see the other complete Gemma Skirt and Blouse we made with a reversible aspect to it!

Posted on

Skirt FACTsination – Fabric Series – Silk History

silk history

For this week’s Skirt Factsination post, I decided to research the history of silk. Silk is a gorgeous fabric, with the history founded in Ancient China. Silk history is about as sumptuous as the fabric itself!  The legend goes that the Empress Leizu, who was only fourteen and the wife of the Yellow Emperor, was drinking tea when a silk-worm cocoon fell into her tea. When she pulled it out, the cocoon began to unwind from association with the hot liquid, and she got the idea to spin the cocoon. The empress became the goddess of silk in Chinese mythology. At the earliest point, only women were allowed to work with and spin silk. It was reserved to be worn by only the emperor and the highest dignitaries. Silk eventually left China with a princess who was promised to be married to a prince of Khotan, who broke the ban on silk exportation. Sericulture remained a great secret of China until it finally leaked out to Korea, Japan and India. With the rise of fabrics like nylon, silk became less prevalent throughout the world, but is now again a luxury good, although much less important than in its heyday. Silk is valued for wedding dresses, and many clothes for special occasions. We, however, prize gorgeous silk skirts, several of which we have shown below.

silk history

  1. Long Nude Silk skirt.

I like the idea of a silk skirt with a leather jacket. I would not wear the particular jacket or scarf shown on the model, but I love the idea of the particular look.

silk history

2.  Vintage Purple skirt.

This skirt is adorable!!! I like the lace shirt and the brown leather belt. This is a particularly sumptuous looking skirt.

silk history

3.  The Pink Ruffle skirt.

Soooo cute!!! I love the ruffles on this skirt, and how they are alternated high and low on the skirt! This would be cute with a plain white blouse and black heels.

I hope you find silk history as exciting as I do!  In the very near future, we’re going to be refashioning a silk skirt, so keep your eyes peeled for it!

Always be Exciting,

Allegra.