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Sandbryce Skirt

Sandbryce Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

Meet my new favorite summer outfit.  This is the mash up of 2 patterns, the Sandbridge Skirt and the Bryce Cargos.  I’m calling it the Sandbryce Skirt.  I’ve been on a hunt for a good cargo skirt pattern, and finally decided to take matters into my own hands.  I ended up with a skirt I’m going to be making again ASAP so this one can get some rest.  Or at least not worn 3 times per week!

Sandbryce Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

Earlier in the year, Emily shared a tutorial over at Hey June Handmade on how to mash these two patterns but she did it the exact opposite of me!  So it’s not copying at all, is it?  She used the Sandbridge Skirt on top and the Bryce Cargo pants on bottom to make herself a pair of jeans.

Sandbryce Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

To create my Sandbryce Skirt, I laid out the pattern pieces for the Bryce Cargo pants first.  Then on top of them I overlaid the Sandbridge Skirt pattern pieces.  I lined them up the best I could.  On the front pieces, I matched up the zip fly parts.  

Sandbryce Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

For the back pieces, I matched the hip curves for the outseam.  Then I folded in the crotch triangles for the pants pattern on front and back.  As you can see on the front, the Sandbridge Skirt pattern piece is wider than the Bryce Cargo piece (on top of it.)  Because I was using stretch twill, I eventually decided just to go with the side seam of the Bryce Cargos so as not to mess up the pocket, and angled in from the hem to that point.

Sandbryce Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

As far as instructions went, I basically followed the Bryce Cargo steps, except where obviously I needed to follow the Sandbridge Skirt steps.  It worked out great!  The only change I might make next time is to take in the center back a little more at the top.  

Sandbryce Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

I made this Sandbryce Skirt knee length, just by measuring how long I needed it, and continuing the lines of the skirt down that far at the same angles.  

Sandbryce Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

You can see the insides of this skirt are very professionally finished, per the pattern instructions (on both patterns!)  

Sandbryce Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

Adding all the hardware (snaps) was a learning experience for me, but totally worth it!  Like I mentioned in my Denim Week series, the hardware is one of the things that makes a skirt look professional and not “homemade.”

Sandbryce Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

This fabric is stretch twill from JoAnn Fabrics in a color called Clay.  It is amazingly good quality, and very, very comfortable!  In fact, I’ve already picked up some in this khaki to make myself another Sandbryce Skirt.  And I really want to get it in this olive green color except my local store doesn’t have it right now.  (The price of this stretch twill online right now is ridiculously cheap!!!)

Sandbryce Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

Of course I had to make myself a new shirt to go with my new skirt.  I made myself the Santa Fe top using the most beautiful rayon spandex jersey from Raspberry Creek Fabrics.  It’s currently sold out, but they have a beautiful selection of other rayon spandex jersey fabric.

This is seriously my favorite outfit to wear, and I think Mr. Skirt Fixation likes it a little bit too!  

Sandbryce Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

Have you ever mashed up two patterns and ended up with an end result that was better (if possible!) than either of the patterns to begin with?  That’s the beauty of sewing your own clothes…you can make EXACTLY what you love every time!

Affiliate links are used in this post to patterns and fabric we use and love.  If you click on one of our links, we might make a little bit of money at no extra cost to you for referring you to that company.  Thanks for supporting our small business!

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Santa Fe Dress

Santa Fe top turned dress by Skirt Fixation

Allegra’s summer job requires her to be on her feet in an uncomfortable uniform all day long.  So when she gets home she just wants to be comfortable in non-constricting clothes.  She described to me exactly what she wanted; a loose, flowy dress with dolman sleeves and no shaping.  Immediately my thoughts turned to the Santa Fe pattern.

Santa Fe top turned dress by Skirt Fixation

TO make the Santa Fe top into a dress, I simply measured from her shoulder to her knee, and made the pattern that long.  I kept the same angle of the A shape at the side seams, and dipped the hem down in front.  I think I ended up adding about 15 inches to the length.

For the fabric I used some super lightweight rayon jersey from the stash.  I don’t remember exactly where we sourced it, but you can find similar here: Rayon Jersey Yarn Dye Knit Grey Fabric.

Santa Fe top turned dress by Skirt Fixation

Right now the Santa Fe top is the featured pattern over at Hey June Handmade, so you can grab it for 15% off.  It’s already a steal, at full price with 6 different views.  You can see the other Santa Fe tops we’ve sewn here and our review of the pattern here.  Be prepared for a new favorite pattern!

Allegra is delighted with this Santa Fe dress.  She says it’s like wearing a cloud!  Whenever she get home, she slips into this dress for some R&R time!

Santa Fe top turned dress by Skirt Fixation

Leave us a comment below…what do you wear when you just need to relax?

Some affiliate links are used in this post to really great products!  We’ve chosen to be affiliates for them because of their awesomeness.  Be aware that if you click on one of our affiliate links, we might make a few pennies at no extra cost to you!