Posted on

Sew the Rainbow

Sew the Rainbow with Skirt Fixation

Earlier this summer, I did a bunch of kid sewing that I never shared here!  The inspiration was from the Project Run & Play Sew The Rainbow themed weeks.  (Please go check out Project Run & Play, it’s an online children’s sewing event that I am privileged to lead, and there are some fantastic things happening over there!  It’s why this blog is a little quieter than usual right now.)  Here’s how we decided to sew the rainbow…

Sew the Rainbow with Skirt Fixation

For red/pink week, both Annie and Thomas got t-shirts.  In fact, Annie sewed her own shirt!  She used the Camden Raglan pattern by Hey June Patterns, and was so delighted to whip up this little raglan tee for herself.  

Sew the Rainbow with Skirt Fixation

The fabric is Art Gallery Fabric knit leftover from this dress.  I couldn’t find it in stock, but this one is pretty similar and also an Art Gallery Fabric knit.

Sew the Rainbow with Skirt Fixation

Thomas also got a t-shirt.  For his we used buffalo plaid knit fabric (like this one) and he’s in heaven!  He’s been wearing it all summer.  We used the Shwin & Shwin Lennon Tee pattern.

Sew the Rainbow with Skirt Fixation

For orange week, Annie requested a nightgown.   We again used the Camden Raglan pattern as our base, but lengthened it into a nightgown length.   This fabric came from the Hancock Fabrics going out of business sale, but this gorgeous orange feather fabric would make a delightful nightgown!

Sew the Rainbow with Skirt Fixation

Then came yellow week!  Again, Annie got a new garment!  This time I sewed her a knit pencil skirt with shorts underneath.  We used the Jocole Pencil skirt pattern, and added the shorts from the Skipalong Skort underneath.  This fabric is also sold out (we were using up fabric from our stash for this exercise!) but here is a super soft, bright yellow, similar knit fabric.  

Sew the Rainbow with Skirt Fixation

Then came green week!  We’ve blogged both our makes for this week earlier.  You can see David and Lowell’s green camo rain jackets here.

Sew the Rainbow with Skirt Fixation

Also, I sewed a little sloth outfit for a friend’s new baby that totally falls into the green category and also things I haven’t blogged category!  I used the Seattle Skater Skirt pattern for the brown skirt, the Lollipop Leggings pattern for the leggings, and the Rosemary Raglan for the little tee.  Then I designed and added the darling sloth graphic using my Cricut Maker.

Sew the Rainbow with Skirt Fixation

And sort of bridging between green and blue weeks, Annie’s swimsuit is a turquoise/aqua color.  You can read all about it here.

Sew the Rainbow with Skirt Fixation

Then for blue week, we went sort of crazy.  In fact, we got stuck on blue week and still haven’t made it to indigo/violet week.  David and Lowell got swim trunks and rashguards which you can read about here.

Sew the Rainbow with Skirt Fixation

My biggest son got a pair of navy blue sweat pants.  We used some navy sweatshirt fleece, and the men’s Hudson Pants pattern.  As a little aside, he’s totally over the moon about a pair of sweatpants that fit his long, long, long legs!

Sew the Rainbow with Skirt Fixation

And then there was the whole blue patriotic parade of fabric that we sewed.  You can read all about those garments in this blog post.

Sew the Rainbow with Skirt Fixation

One reason this post took so long to get up is because we just never sewed any purple garment!  In fact, we’re still sewing with blue (as will be shown next week!)  But we did manage to sew some dresses that fit into the rainbow week theme, and you can read all about them in this blog post.

Thanks for taking time to read about our Sew the Rainbow garments!  It’s been quite a colorful summer around here.

Affiliate links are used in this post to fabric and patterns we use and love.  If you click on one of our links, we may earn a few pennies at no additional cost to you.  Thank you for supporting our small sewing business!

Posted on

1 Pattern, 3 Shirts – A Comparison

Union St. Tee sewn by Skirt Fixation

Recently, I used the Union St. Tee pattern from Hey June Patterns to sew 3 quite different shirts for my daughters and I.  It’s one thing we love about this pattern, the versatility.  And if you would like to read an in-depth comparison of the 3 fabrics I used, head over to CaliFabrics.

Union St. Tee

The first Union St. Tee I sewed was for Allegra.  She requested the scoop neckline and elbow length sleeves.  I’ve actually never made the scoop neckline before, and think it looks so nice on her!  The elbow length sleeves will help stretch this tee into fall wearing.  Allegra requested a semi-slouchy tee, so I made a size large and graded out to a size XL at the hips.  Also, I used the full bust adjustment front piece and it fits so nicely on her.  Finally, I added 1 extra inch of width at the shoulders, because although she is not as tall as Aria or I, she got that wide shoulder gene.   Her Union St. Tee is made from modal fabric.

Union St. Tee sewn by Skirt Fixation

The next Union St. Tee I sewed for Aria.  She requested the crew neckline and elbow length sleeves.  After she felt the camo linen jersey, she also requested a slouchy tee, so I made her a size L, and added 1” at the shoulders and 2” to the length.  Since this fabric doesn’t have much recovery, I used plain white jersey for the neckband.  I haven’t officially admitted it yet, but I think she’s taller than me.

Union St. Tee sewn by Skirt Fixation

And of course, I had to get in on the Union St. Tee fun!  I sewed the v-neck and raised it 1”, my standard adjustment for this pattern.  I added 1.5” to the length and also used the 1” broad shoulder adjustment.  To make this tee just right for fall wearing, I also chose the elbow length sleeve.  For fun, I added a striped pocket to this tee.  My Union St. Tee is made from double brushed poly fabric.  

Union St. Tee sewn by Skirt Fixation

In a side by side comparison (there are more of these over at CaliFabrics) you can see more of the differences in the 3 shirts.  One pattern, 3 different shirts, 3 happy wearers!

Affiliate links are used in this post, because we love buying fabric and patterns!  If you click on one of our affiliate links, we might make a few extra pennies at no extra cost to you.  Thank you for supporting our small business.  Be assured we only recommend and link to products we use and love!

Posted on

A Sweet, Sentimental Collar from Old Linens

Vintage Linen Collar sewn by Skirt Fixation

Today I’ve got a sweet, sentimental collar story!  When a fabric is listed with the title “Robin’s Egg Blue” and that’s the exact color of your baby’s eyes, there’s no question as to whether or not you’re going to get that fabric!  And the icing on the cake is that this is some of the nicest jersey I’ve ever worked with.  You can read my full review of the dress fabric over on the CaliFabrics blog.  But today I want to share with you about that sweet little collar made from vintage linen.

Vintage Linen Collar sewn by Skirt Fixation

Recently, we had the opportunity to help some dear friends of ours move to a new home.  This move was all about downsizing.  That meant having to disposition many belongings.  And if you’ve ever had to get rid of something sentimental, you know what an agonizing process this was for our friends.  

Vintage Linen Collar sewn by Skirt Fixation

Being the sweet, selfless friends they are, they tried to give many of their belongings to the people helping them with the moving process.  We all know that it hurts less to give things to people you know will love and care for them than to throw them away or send them to a faceless donation center.

Vintage Linen Collar sewn by Skirt Fixation

The problem with this plan for us was that with 8 kids and 2 adults in our home, we don’t need and don’t have room for many more belongings than we already have!  In fact, we have a sort of constant purging process in place around here.  But a few small things made it home with us, despite our best intentions to the contrary.

Vintage Linen Collar sewn by Skirt Fixation

One precious item we just couldn’t refuse was a box of vintage linens.  I mean fabric, right?  (The photo above shows what it looks like when you tell a toddler to twirl so you can get a shot of the circle skirt on her dress!  Toddler’s can’t twirl!!!)

Vintage Linen Collar sewn by Skirt Fixation

Plus, these are some pretty special linens.  There are hand embroidered items, and probably hand crocheted edges although I’m not an expert in that field.  One oval shaped linen had a note pinned to it with the words, “First embroidery I ever did pre-teen.”  But when we asked our friend, she said it was not her work but her mother’s!

Vintage Linen Collar sewn by Skirt Fixation

There are lace items too.  One problem is that in our day and age, linens like these are not used as they were originally.  Some of the vintage linens are of shapes and sizes we can’t even identify their original use.  But each one is gorgeous and clearly hand made.

A couple of the vintage linens have yellowing, as many old linens do.  One such one we decided to use as the collar for Baby’s new dress.  The delicate embroidery is encased between the two layers of collar, and featured on the tips.  It really adds such a beautiful touch to this darling dress!

So that is the story of a box of vintage linens, some dear friends and a collar on a robin’s egg blue dress.  Leave us a comment, what would YOU do with a box of vintage linens?

Dress: Janie Dress

Fabric: Robin’s Egg Blue jersey from CaliFabrics

Posted on

10 Ways to use a Cricut Maker for Apparel Sewing

10 Ways to Use the Cricut Maker for Apparel Sewing by Skirt Fixation

Today I’m sharing 10 amazing ways to use a Cricut Maker for Apparel Sewing.  This post was sponsored by Cricut, but all opinions are mine.  When Cricut introduced the Maker and it’s amazing rotary blade for putting virtually any fabric without a backer, it opened up a whole bunch of opportunities for those of us who love apparel sewing.  So let’s get started with the 10 ways to use a Cricut Maker for apparel sewing.

1-Baby Bloomers

Simplicity Baby Bloomers sewn by Skirt Fixation

Did you know that you can find complete sewing patterns on Cricut Design Space™?  It’s true!  I found these darling little chambray bloomers in the Design Space project center and sewed up a pair for my baby quicker than you can imagine!  Bloomers under her skirts and dresses are a go-to garment around here, and this pair will go super well with the little capsule wardrobe I’m sewing for her!

Simplicity Baby Bloomers sewn by Skirt Fixation

It was super duper easy to sew up these bloomers after the Cricut Maker cut out the chambray fabric and marked the pieces and notches using the fabric marking pen.  Note: the pattern says it is sized for a 6 month baby, but due to the elastic, it’s working fine for Baby who is 16 months.  Just note the weight and size.  And we used Baby’s measurements for the elastic, not the guide given.  We will definitely be sewing up more of these Simplicity Baby Bloomers!  You can find the project right here.

2-Headband

Headband sewing by Skirt Fixation

This darling headband is also a Cricut Design Space™ project.  The only change we made was to use knit fabric instead of felt because we didn’t have felt in the right colors we wanted.  But it’s sooooooo cute!  You can find the project here.

3-Graphic Tees

Patriotic fabric parade created and sewn by Skirt Fixation

This one is a crowd favorite for sure!  I created the patriotic tee above using my Cricut Maker to cut out the Sport Flex Iron On.  Although I do not have an Easy Press, many people report great success with using it to iron on their images to their tees.  You can read more about Annie’s outfit and grab that FREE cut file here.

4-Exterior Label Tags

Special tag for denim by Skirt Fixation

In my recent Denim Week series, I shared two leather and Kraftex tags I created using the Cricut Maker for the back of my denim skirts I sewed.  They add a very classy and special touch to any denim garment.

5-Interior Garment Labels

My friend Tami, from SewSophieLynn, shared how to make custom interior size labels for garments in this post.  Boy oh boy, did I need that information with all the different sizes I have going on around here with 8 kids!

6-Elbow and Knee Patches

The very talented Abby from Sew Much Ado used the Cricut Maker to add knee patches to her free baby pants pattern that we love!  Read all about it in this post.  You can also use the same technique to add elbow patches…which we love to do too!

7-Day of the Week Underwear

Kari from That’s Sew Kari created these perfectly adorable and practical day of the week underwear in this post.  How much more genius can it get?  She used her Cricut Explore Air 2, but of course you can use the Cricut Maker to do the same thing!

8-Removeable Collar

Amber of Amber Simmons used her Cricut Maker to create this fabulous Peter Pan collar.  It’s just the cutest thing ever!  We’d use it to layer under sweaters in the winter for just the right touch.  Read more about it in her post here.

9-Baby Shoes

These baby shoes were made with the help of a Cricut Maker!  Aren’t they about the most darling thing ever?  This project can be found in Design Space here.  The next person I know who has a baby girl is definitely getting these in their handmade care package!

10-Baby Dress

A complete baby dress for 3-6 months size!  This entire project can be cut out on the Cricut Maker.  Plus all the notches get cut out too, and any markings are marked.  Those are my least favorite parts of the project!  Did you know that you can find over 500+ digital sewing patterns and quilt blocks available from Simplicity®, Riley Blake™, and more (sold separately) through Cricut Design Space™?  And Design Space® software works for iOS, Android™, Windows®, and Mac® too.

10 Ways to Use the Cricut Maker for Apparel Sewing by Skirt Fixation

If you’re considering a Cricut Maker for apparel sewing, these are 10 options to get you started.  And also you might like to know the Cricut Maker offers the ultimate in cutting performance and versatility. Unlike all other cutting machines it has:

  • Bluetooth® wireless technology
  • Adaptive Tool System™ for professional-level cutting performance and expandability
  • Compatible with Washable Fabric Pen for marking pattern pieces (sold separately)
  • Cuts hundreds of materials, from the most delicate fabric and paper to matboard and leather
  • The ultimate in professional-level cutting performance and versatility

And more!  Leave us a comment, what apparel project would you sew with a Cricut Maker?

Affiliate links are used in this post to products we use and recommend.  If you click on one of our links, we may make a small commission at no extra cost to you.  Thank you for helping support our small business!

This is a sponsored conversation written by me on behalf of Cricut. The opinions and text are all mine.

Posted on

Sandbryce Skirt

Sandbryce Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

Meet my new favorite summer outfit.  This is the mash up of 2 patterns, the Sandbridge Skirt and the Bryce Cargos.  I’m calling it the Sandbryce Skirt.  I’ve been on a hunt for a good cargo skirt pattern, and finally decided to take matters into my own hands.  I ended up with a skirt I’m going to be making again ASAP so this one can get some rest.  Or at least not worn 3 times per week!

Sandbryce Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

Earlier in the year, Emily shared a tutorial over at Hey June Handmade on how to mash these two patterns but she did it the exact opposite of me!  So it’s not copying at all, is it?  She used the Sandbridge Skirt on top and the Bryce Cargo pants on bottom to make herself a pair of jeans.

Sandbryce Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

To create my Sandbryce Skirt, I laid out the pattern pieces for the Bryce Cargo pants first.  Then on top of them I overlaid the Sandbridge Skirt pattern pieces.  I lined them up the best I could.  On the front pieces, I matched up the zip fly parts.  

Sandbryce Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

For the back pieces, I matched the hip curves for the outseam.  Then I folded in the crotch triangles for the pants pattern on front and back.  As you can see on the front, the Sandbridge Skirt pattern piece is wider than the Bryce Cargo piece (on top of it.)  Because I was using stretch twill, I eventually decided just to go with the side seam of the Bryce Cargos so as not to mess up the pocket, and angled in from the hem to that point.

Sandbryce Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

As far as instructions went, I basically followed the Bryce Cargo steps, except where obviously I needed to follow the Sandbridge Skirt steps.  It worked out great!  The only change I might make next time is to take in the center back a little more at the top.  

Sandbryce Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

I made this Sandbryce Skirt knee length, just by measuring how long I needed it, and continuing the lines of the skirt down that far at the same angles.  

Sandbryce Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

You can see the insides of this skirt are very professionally finished, per the pattern instructions (on both patterns!)  

Sandbryce Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

Adding all the hardware (snaps) was a learning experience for me, but totally worth it!  Like I mentioned in my Denim Week series, the hardware is one of the things that makes a skirt look professional and not “homemade.”

Sandbryce Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

This fabric is stretch twill from JoAnn Fabrics in a color called Clay.  It is amazingly good quality, and very, very comfortable!  In fact, I’ve already picked up some in this khaki to make myself another Sandbryce Skirt.  And I really want to get it in this olive green color except my local store doesn’t have it right now.  (The price of this stretch twill online right now is ridiculously cheap!!!)

Sandbryce Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

Of course I had to make myself a new shirt to go with my new skirt.  I made myself the Santa Fe top using the most beautiful rayon spandex jersey from Raspberry Creek Fabrics.  It’s currently sold out, but they have a beautiful selection of other rayon spandex jersey fabric.

This is seriously my favorite outfit to wear, and I think Mr. Skirt Fixation likes it a little bit too!  

Sandbryce Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

Have you ever mashed up two patterns and ended up with an end result that was better (if possible!) than either of the patterns to begin with?  That’s the beauty of sewing your own clothes…you can make EXACTLY what you love every time!

Affiliate links are used in this post to patterns and fabric we use and love.  If you click on one of our links, we might make a little bit of money at no extra cost to you for referring you to that company.  Thanks for supporting our small business!

Posted on

Knit Summer Dresses for my Girls

Knit summer dressed for girls sewn by Skirt Fixation

It’s begun.  Summer temperatures have arrived, and with it, the requests for summer clothes.  For my younger girls, this means knit fabric, light colors, and breezy silhouettes.  Two knit summer dresses coming right up!  

Knit summer dressed for girls sewn by Skirt Fixation

One of Annie’s favorite dresses from last summer is the Ila Dress I sewed for her from french terry fabric.  She still wears it, although it’s about 6 inches shorter than when I sewed it.  Not my laundry skills, her growing skills!

Knit summer dressed for girls sewn by Skirt Fixation

For these two dresses I got to use the new summer fabrics from Raspberry Creek Fabrics.  These fabrics shout “sum, sum, summertime!”  There’s lemonade, fruit, dots, waves and sea creatures.

For the main fabric I used textured sand stripe jersey knit fabric for these knit summer dresses.

Knit summer dressed for girls sewn by Skirt Fixation

As with all CLUB fabric from Raspberry Creek Fabrics, this fabric is super soft, does not pill, and has great stretch and recovery.  This sand stripe looks textured, and just begs for a lemonade stand operation, don’t you think?

Knit summer dressed for girls sewn by Skirt Fixation

The Ila Dress by Coffee and Thread does not call for knit fabric, so I made the same modifications as last time.  It really makes it quite a fast sewing project.

Knit summer dressed for girls sewn by Skirt Fixation

For Annie, I added a ruffle to the bottom of the sleeves and hem.  This gives her added length (due to that growing-like-a-weed condition!) and makes it fun.  I used mustard jersey knit fabric from Raspberry Creek Fabrics for the ruffles and center panel.  

Knit summer dressed for girls sewn by Skirt Fixation

Baby also got a knit Ila dress.  I have to admit, I sewed her a size too big, but thankfully, she’ll grow into it.  Perhaps it’ll last longer than a month that way!  She seemed to notice that her and Annie were matching and got a great kick out of posing with Annie for these photos!

Knit summer dressed for girls sewn by Skirt Fixation

Her contrast center panel and neck yoke are from bright fuchsia jersey knit fabric from Raspberry Creek Fabrics.  This color really brings out the pink tones in her cheeks and lips, and is so precious, if I do say so myself!

Knit summer dressed for girls sewn by Skirt Fixation

One of Annie’s favorite things about this dress are the hidden pockets.  Baby ignored hers until shown how she could put treasures into them, and then wouldn’t stop putting things in!  

Knit summer dressed for girls sewn by Skirt Fixation

Now I can check a few knit summer dresses off that summer sewing list.  Except that Annie caught sight of the other summer fabric I got from Raspberry Creek Fabrics and put in her order for a summer maxi skirt.  Stay tuned on that…

Knit summer dressed for girls sewn by Skirt Fixation

Posted on

Indigo and Aster fabric tour for my girls

Skirt Fixation for Indigo and Aster by Bari J.

Hello and welcome!  I’m delighted to share some Indigo and Aster fabric goodness with you today.

Skirt Fixation for Indigo and Aster by Bari J.

This photo shoot was inspired by the floral crowns on the border print fabric of the Indigo and Aster fabrics.  Each animal is wearing a floral crown in that border print fabric!

Skirt Fixation for Indigo and Aster by Bari J.

I’ll start with my older daughter, Annie, and then go on to Baby’s two outfits.

Skirt Fixation for Indigo and Aster by Bari J.

For the skirt, we used the border print panel. Each of the animals has a darling floral crown!  Since we have dairy goats, we just had to include one of the yearlings in our photoshoot.    The pattern we used is the Lottie Skirt by Violette Field Threads.  We just left off the suspenders this time around.  

Skirt Fixation for Indigo and Aster by Bari J.

We added a piece of lace trim at the bottom of the waistband panel.  Annie liked this touch.  Girly, but not too babyish she said.  Next came an Aster Cardigan to pair with the skirt.  This fabric is the bright, cheerful, colorful, floral knit print from the Indigo and Aster line.  Underneath the cardigan, Annie is wearing a brand new Camden Raglan I sewed just for the occasion.  It’s a great layering piece.

Skirt Fixation for Indigo and Aster by Bari J.

Somehow, Baby ended up with 4 pieces of clothing out of the deal!  I already shared a little about the green Rosemary pinafore (pattern by Violette Field Threads) in this post.  I used the lush bouquet green fabric for the main part of the pinafore.  It is lined with this tiny, floral print called Bonheur Fresh, and also the ties are the same print.

Velveteen Rabbit Inspired baby outfit sewn by Skirt Fixation

The dress underneath is the Eeny Meeny Miny Moe dress pattern.  I used my tutorial to make it gathered and also added lace to the ends of the sleeves.

Velveteen Rabbit Inspired baby outfit sewn by Skirt Fixation

And you can see Baby is wearing a bonnet.  As with all the bonnets I make (and sell!) this one is reversible.  On the floral side is one of my favorite prints from the Indigo and Aster line.  It’s called Foliage Escape Lapis. 

Skirt Fixation for Indigo and Aster by Bari J.

The other side of the bonnet is blue velvet.  I also used some blue velvet ribbon for the ties.  

Skirt Fixation for Indigo and Aster by Bari J.

As you can see, I loved this foliage escape lapis print so much, I used the knit version of it to make Baby another Eeny Meny Miny Moe dress.  Once again, I modified it using my tutorial.  I also added lace to the front bodice and above the ruffle I added to the end of the sleeves using this tutorial.

Skirt Fixation for Indigo and Aster by Bari J.

That’s all for today!  Thanks for visiting and head over to Bari J.’s Curated Maximalist blog to see what others are making with Indigo and Aster fabric this week!

The beautiful photography in this post is the work of Delaney Aby.

Affiliate links are used in this post to really amazing patterns and fabric.  Because we love and use them, we use affiliate links to try to make a little money.  If you click on one of our affiliate links, we might earn a few extra pennies at no additional cost to you, so THANKS!

Posted on

Me Made May 2018 Week 5

Phoenix Blouse sewed and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

I know, I know.  We’re into June and I’m still sharing things from May.  But, I’ve been busy, and I wanted to complete my round up of Me Made May skirt outfits.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BjUyDhrh7lQ/?taken-by=skirtfixation

This skirt is the Sandbridge Skirt pattern from Hey June Patterns.  It’s truly lovely, and I’m so excited to share the details of this (and the other Sandbridge Skirt I sewed!) that I’ve planned a whole entire week dedicated to denim coming at you the last week of June.  There’s going to be a giveaway, stunning details, inspiration, resources and more.  So stay tuned!!!  This skirt is sewn with stretch denim.  The place I bought it is sold out, but here’s a very similar stretch denim.

The shirt is a Union St. Tee from Hey June Patterns.  It’s made from cream knit fabric (I can highly recommend this fabric!) and I wear it with everything!  This shirt pattern is reviewed here.

It may appear as if I’m wearing the same skirt as yesterday, and while that skirt is awesome enough to wear 2 days in a row, this is a different skirt. When I have a pattern that I love, I often sew more than 1 at a time. Do you batch sew? Anyway I’m wearing it today so I can get it blogged and share the amazing goodness of them both. And the huge differences. . . Shirt pattern: #seafarertop by @sewmuchado Shirt fabric: #fleetandflourishfabrics by @maureencracknell for @artgalleryfabrics Skirt pattern: #sandbridgeskirt by @heyjunehandmade Skirt fabric: stretch denim from @raspberrycreekfabrics . . #mmmay18 #memademay #denimmaxi #handmadewardrobe #memademay18 #sewmodest #sewingtall #sewingforme #sewsewsew #skirtsewing #sewingskirts #isewmyownclothes #sewinglyfe #dreamskirt #waituntilyouseetherest #rcfmonthlymakes #wearefabrics #feelthedifference

A post shared by Skirt Fixation (@skirtfixation) on

This is the other Sandbridge Skirt I sewed.  And I can’t wait to show you the differences between the two skirts!

The top is the Seafarer dolman sleeve top pattern by Sew Much Ado.  It’s sewn using Fleet and Flourish knit fabric by Art Gallery Fabrics.  You can read our review of this top here.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BjZx0dYB7Jb/?taken-by=skirtfixation

And you probably recognize this outfit from the other day…it’s the Phoenix Blouse by Hey June Patterns sewn in rayon chambray fabric.  The blue I used is sold out, but here’s black rayon chambray.

And the skirt is the Jocole Pencil Skirt sewn in Arizona After knit fabric from Art Gallery Fabrics.  Full review of both these garments here.

https://www.instagram.com/p/Bjca1Pah6_k/?taken-by=skirtfixation

This skirt is the Simple Pencil Skirt (reviewed here) in textured knit fabric.  (similar fabric here)

The top is a Lane Raglan made with a black micro rib knit modal fabric.   (similar fabric here)

Happy Hey June June! We’re all decked out in @heyjunehandmade to celebrate the occasion, are you? . . Top pattern: #unionsttee by @heyjunehandmade hacked to a peplum just for this occasion! Top fabric: buttery soft bamboo jersey from @blackbirdfabrics Skirt pattern: #sandbridgeskirt by @heyjunehandmade Skirt fabric: stretch denim from @raspberrycreekfabrics Dress pattern: #camdenraglan by @heyjunehandmade lengthened to a dress. Dress fabric: #pandaliciousfabrics by @katarinaroccella for @artgalleryfabrics . . #heyjunejune #heyjunepatterns #youcanhackit #isewmyownclothes #memadeeveryday #handmadewardrobe #wearefabrics #sewingforgirls #sewingtall #sewingforme #makersgonnamake #sewersgonnasew #sewistsofinstagram #seamstressonduty✂️ #bamboojersey #blackbirdfabrics #feelthedifference #sewingisselfcare #sewingblogger #skirtfixationsews2018 #skirtsewing #sewingskirts

A post shared by Skirt Fixation (@skirtfixation) on

Technically, this was June 1st, but it was another outfit I shared on Instagram!  I’m wearing a Union St. Tee that I added a peplum to.  This peplum top is one of my favorite shirts, so I added another one to my wardrobe.  I used bamboo knit fabric from Blackbird Fabrics, but they’re sold out.  Good thing I found a similar fabric here for you!

Annie is wearing her Camden Raglan dress from this post.  It is made using Art Gallery Fabric Pandalicious knit fabric.

That wraps up Me Made May 2018 for us!  Since it’s not the 1st year we’ve participated, we didn’t get any huge new revelations, but used the opportunity to add to and subtract from our wardrobe.  How about you?  Did you participate in Me Made May?

Affiliate links are used in this post.  This means that if you click on one of our affiliate links, we might make a few pennies if you make a purchase.  But no worries, it won’t add anything to your bill, it’s just a little commission we make from the merchant.  Thanks for helping support our small sewing business!

Posted on

Flutter Sleeve Tutorial

Slash and spread flutter sleeve tutorial from Skirt Fixation

Today I’ve got a quick and easy flutter sleeve tutorial for you.  And the beauty of this is that you can do this to any pattern that has a sleeve!  I used the Union St. Tee by Hey June Patterns, but you can use any pattern with sleeves.

This method is a slash and spread method, but the beauty of it is that you keep the original length of the armscye, so you don’t have to adjust your shirt pattern piece, only the sleeve.

Flutter Sleeve Tutorial:

Slash and spread flutter sleeve tutorial from Skirt Fixation

Start by cutting into your sleeve pattern piece from the bottom, up to 1/2″ away from the top.  Spread each of these pieces apart the same distance.  I used a 1″ space between my pieces, buy you could certainly do more.  Then I cut around my new pattern piece and also extended the length of the sleeve piece by 2″ for more flair.

Slash and spread flutter sleeve tutorial from Skirt Fixation

That’s it!  Super easy and fast, and of course, fluttery!!!

Slash and spread flutter sleeve tutorial from Skirt FixationSlash and spread flutter sleeve tutorial from Skirt Fixation

If you’d like to read more about the fabric we used, and also the skirt we made to go with our flutter sleeve top, head over to CaliFabrics.  There’s a little story about why this skirt pattern ended up working perfectly after basically failing the first time around.

Affiliate links are used in this post to products we use and love.  Thank you for supporting our small business when you click on them.  It means a lot to us, and doesn’t cost you anything extra!

Posted on

Me Made May 2018 Week 3

Me Made May week 3 by Skirt Fixation

Over on Instagram (follow us here!) we are participating in Me Made May.  For this event, sewists all around the world wear the clothes they made themselves and share it.  Here is what I’ve been wearing.

Shirt: Union St. Tee by Hey June Patterns in double brushed poly fabric from CaliFabrics reviewed here.

Skirt: Sandbridge Skirt by Hey June Patterns in baby wale corduroy from CaliFabrics reviewed here.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BizXwdtBuS5/?taken-by=skirtfixation

Tiered Maxi skirt by Pattern Emporium reviewed here.

Peplum Top by Jocole in Art Gallery Fabric solid knit reviewed here.

Fancy Sailor Top in super soft Nani Iro double gauze reviewed here.

Pencil skirt in embossed scuba knit from JoAnn Fabrics reviewed here.

https://www.instagram.com/p/Bi4SjW6hsiY/?taken-by=skirtfixation

Runway skirt by Savvy Patterns in Art Gallery Fabrics Blithe knit fabric and Blithe voile fabric for the godets.  Reviewed here.

Black Lane Raglan by Hey June Patterns that just won’t go away!  I’m going to get some of this fabric to replace it though.  Soon…

Me Made May week 3 by Skirt Fixation

The photo above is what I wore on the next day of Me Made May.  Sort of.  And I never got it posted to Instagram.  It was one of those days!  I spent the morning in the goat barn with a doe who was having trouble kidding.  Around lunchtime, I had a lunch meeting that simply could not be avoided.  So I showered, threw on this maxi skirt refashioned from a dress (see the original post here) and my white Union St. Tee in Riley Blake Designs white knit fabric.  As soon as I returned, I was back in the barn in my chore clothes until just before supper.  Another shower, and I put on my pajamas for the rest of the evening!  Ah, such is life!

https://www.instagram.com/p/Bi9dem-hXgA/?taken-by=skirtfixation

Hampton Hoodie by Peekaboo Pattern Shop in Art Gallery Fabrics Petal and Plume knit fabric.

Style J denim maxi skirt in khaki.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BjAE1U_BOzF/?taken-by=skirtfixation

Runway Skirt by Savvy Patterns in Art Gallery Fabrics Observer knit fabric with cream rayon challis for the godets.

Cheyenne Tunic by Hey June Patterns in fine chambray from CaliFabrics reviewed here.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BjDAXwahF4G/?taken-by=skirtfixation

And from yesterday, the Mermaid Maxi Skirt in Art Gallery Fabrics Millie Fleur knit fabric.

And my favorite new basic, the Union St. Tee by Hey June Patterns in chocolate Dana modal knit fabric.

That’s it for this week!  See you next week…

Affiliate links are used in this post to really great fabric and patterns that we’ve tried and love.  Please accept our thanks for supporting our small sewing business when you click on our affiliate links.  It won’t cost you anything extra, and we might make a little profit.