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Reversible Paneled Skirt Tutorial

Reversible Paneled Skirt tutorial by Skirt Fixation

What’s better than 1 new skirt?  2 new skirts, of course!  And if that can be 2 new skirts in 1…bonus!  Today we have share how to make a reversible paneled skirt tutorial with you.

Reversible Paneled Skirt tutorial by Skirt Fixation

We started with the Jalie 2681 paneled skirt pattern and some denim-look knit fabric from CaliFabrics.  (Please head over to the Cali Fabrics blog to read all about why this fabric worked perfectly for this project, and also the shirts we sewed to go with the reversible paneled skirt.)

Reversible Paneled Skirt tutorial by Skirt Fixation

Aria couldn’t decide which side of this denim knit fabric she liked better, and asked if there was a way to make the skirt reversible.  After some thought, I came up with a way to make it reversible with just a few modifications to the pattern.

1st of all, serge each seam to put the panels together.  If you don’t have a serger, you can sew the seams with a regular sewing machine and a stretch stitch.  And then zigzag the edges of the seam allowances together.  

The next step is to press and then topstitch the finished seam allowance down to the skirt.  Be sure to press each seam allowance the same way.  Doing these two steps makes it look like all the seams are coverstitched without having a coverstitch machine.

To finish the hem, first serge (or zigzag) the bottom raw edge of the skirt.  Then turn the finished seam up, making sure to turn it to the side where the exposed seams are.

Reversible Paneled Skirt tutorial by Skirt Fixation

The waistband can be done a couple of different ways, so we’ll just share how we did this one.  Finish the top of the skirt with a serger or zigzag stitch.  Turn that serging to inside by 2.25” or 1.25” depending if you’re going to insert 1” or 2” elastic.  Topstitch down the serged edge, leaving an opening to insert the elastic.  Insert the elastic, and then close the opening.  

Reversible Paneled Skirt tutorial by Skirt Fixation

That’s it!  And the skirt is totally reversible.  Aria is in love with this 2-in-1 reversible paneled skirt.  She also made herself 2 tops to go with this skirt, one for each side! The olive dolman sleeve knit top is the Seafarer from Sew Much Ado. The light blue is a Lane Raglan from Hey June Patterns. Now she’s challenged me to figure out how to add pockets…any suggestions?

Affiliate links are used in this post to products we use and love and feel confident in recommending to you. If you click through one of our links and buy something, we might make a few pennies for referring you, but don’t worry, it won’t add anything to your checkout price! Thank you for supporting our small business!

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Make Nine Update #1

Skirt Outfits Skirt Fixation plans to sew in 2019

My 1st outfit from my Make 9 (Outfits) is complete!  I took the opportunity of an upcoming birth to make myself the most comfortable pajamas outfit for the postpartum days when I’ll be in bed recovering from giving birth.  In the past, I’ve never thought about a special outfit for this time, instead just grabbing whatever was at hand and then cringing when I was wearing a pajama shirt with gaping holes in the elbows or something similar when someone came to see the baby!

Skirt Outfits Skirt Fixation plans to sew in 2019

This outfit changed a little bit from my original plan.  This was with the thought of postpartum and nursing in mind.  Originally I had planned to make a Paro Cardigan, but realized a Julia Cardigan would be better suited to the purpose I had in mind. 

Julia Cardigan sewn by Skirt Fixation for the Make 9 Challenge

The shape of the Julia Cardigan is more ideal for nursing and lounging in bed.  Plus it’s been quite a while since I sewed a Julia Cardigan, and never one with this nice of quality fabric. 

This fabric is vintage Hacci Sweat knit from Girl Charlee. It’s sold out now, but very soft, and very good quality. I had 2 yards, and had just enough scraps left over to make a sweater dress for Baby Tina, so stay tuned for that too!

Julia Cardigan sewn by Skirt Fixation for the Make 9 Challenge

And the pattern was already cut out and ready to go – no muslin needed.  Just sew and go!

Durango Tank sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

This was my 1st time to sew a Durango Tank and the 1st time to do arm bindings like this.  It really isn’t hard to take the extra steps to get this professional looking finished garment.  And I know it’s going to be very comfortable to wear! 

Durango Tank sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

One reason I’m looking forward to wearing the Durango Tank for postpartum days is because of the extra ease through the waist and stomach. Gently on a belly recovering from expanding to the size of a large watermelon!

Durango Tank sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

I love the split back detail…one of those little touches that makes Hey June Patterns special and a touch above the rest!

The fabric I used is super soft Art Gallery Fabrics knit, and will be so perfect for lounging in bed with a new baby!  Or anytime you want to wear it really, but you know where my brain is right now…

Mountain Pose Pants sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

We’ve made the Mountain Pose Pants before several times…and this time I made 2 changes.  I eliminated the side seam by laying the front and back leg pieces side by side and cutting them out as one piece.  Also, I narrowed the bottom of the legs to get more of a leggings look because I anticipate wanting to wear these out of bed too!

I used navy double brushed poly from CaliFabrics, and it’s going to be amazing to wear!  It’s very soft and durable…I know from past experience with DBP from CaliFabrics.  I have worn this pair of Mountain Pose Pants every single night for pajamas during this pregnancy.

Postpartum outfit sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

Here is what I ended up with:

Top Pattern: Durango Tank by Hey June Patterns

Top Fabric: Indigo and Aster knit fabric by Art Gallery Fabrics

Pants Pattern: Mountain Pose Pants by Hey June Patterns

Pants Fabric: Navy Double Brushed Poly from CaliFabrics

Sweater Pattern: Julia Cardigan by Mouse House Creations

Sweater Fabric: Vintage Hacci Sweater fabric from Girl Charlee

Postpartum outfit sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

I got so excited about having a special postpartum outfit that I sewed up another one…stay tuned.

Affiliate links are used in this post to products we use and love. We’d appreciate your support…if you click through these links and make a purchase, we could make a few pennies at no extra cost to you. Thanks!

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Infinity Maternity Dress

Infinity Maternity Dress sewing pattern review by Skirt Fixation

Recently I had the opportunity to help test the Infinity Maternity Dress sewing pattern.  This pattern will be released next week from Maternity Sewing.  (You can find the pattern here.)  This dress has Infinity in it’s name due to the multitude of ways to wear the straps.  

Infinity Maternity Dress sewing pattern review by Skirt Fixation

I chose to make the longest maxi version of the pattern.  And then I made the hem shorter in the front for a high low look.  This was partly due to the fact that the only fabric with enough yardage available at my local fabric shop was not quite wide enough for the circle skirt, and then it shrunk some more in the dryer.  The other reason is for the dramatic effect!

Infinity Maternity Dress sewing pattern review by Skirt Fixation

The straps are quite long, and that is so that they can be wrapped in many different ways.  Over one shoulder, around the (empire) waist only, over both shoulders, crossed in the back, crossed in the front…you get the idea!  

Infinity Maternity Dress sewing pattern review by Skirt Fixation

The pattern was quite easy to sew.  The hardest part was crawling around on the floor with a pregnant belly in the way, to cut out the pieces.  Speaking of cutting out the pieces, I really appreciate that this pattern has both pattern pieces and template pieces.  Template pieces means that you are given measurements, or small pieces to use to create the larger pattern pieces.  This saves paper and time!  

The only change I made to the pattern assembly was to enclose the waistband fully on the inside.  Since the waistband is lined, it was a very easy change to make, and one I prefer to feeling scratchy seams around my belly.

Infinity Maternity Dress sewing pattern review by Skirt Fixation

This fabric is a double knit, or similar fabric from JoAnns.  As I mentioned, I needed 6 yards to make this dress due to the huge circle skirt, and the length of the straps.  It’s not very good quality fabric, and I suspect it would pill if worn often.  However, I’m not sure how often I’ll be wearing this statement dress, and I only have 3 months left of pregnancy, so it’s not going to be an issue.  Another thing about this fabric, it’s really too heavy for the recommended knits for the pattern.  (But remember, it was all I had access to!)  The problem is that the weight of the skirt pulls down the elastic in the back.  I solved this by using the ties to wrap around the back and stabilize the elastic.  If I had known it was going to be an issue, I also could have used wider or stronger elastic.  A lightweight fabric like double brushed poly would be an ideal knit for this dress.

Infinity Maternity Dress sewing pattern review by Skirt Fixation

My kids absolutely squealed when I put this dress on.  They told me it looked like a medieval lady or a Victorian princess!  Aria had loads of fun figuring out how to tie the straps in several different ways.  For reference, I was 24 weeks pregnant in these photos.  I sewed the size 4-6.  There is also a bandeau that can be made to layer under the dress, but I chose to wear a long sleeve shirt due to the cold weather instead.  The dress can be made in 10 different lengths from 22.5″ (mini) to 45″ (extra tall.)  It can also be used for non-maternity wear and would be great for nursing.   

Since I’m really not sure where I’ll ever have an opportunity to wear this dress, I’m going to call it “Frosting.”  There’s a challenge on Instagram to “sew frosting” where everyone is encouraged to sew something they want, even if it’s not practical, basic, everyday wear.  So this dramatic dress definitely qualifies.  

Maternity Sewing Podcast with Audrey from Skirt Fixation

If you’re more interested in my pregnancy journey, I was interviewed by The Maternity Sewing Podcast.  You can listen to that episode here: https://maternitysewing.com/audreys-story-many-pregnancies-and-many-challenges-podcast-episode-7/ Even though I’m an intensely private person, I shared my story in hopes of helping someone else who may be or may have gone through something similar.

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Camo Boys and Sweatpants

Camo pajama pants sewn by Skirt Fixation

My two little boys are currently in their camo phase.  Do all boys go through a camo phase?  All my boys have!  If their camo clothes are clean, they refuse to wear anything else.  Scratch that, they wear their camo clothes when they’re dirty, wet, stained, ripped, dusty, ragged, holey and in any possible condition!

Camo pajama pants sewn by Skirt Fixation

Rather than fight this phase, I’m just surrendering to it.  In fact, I’m afraid I’ve crossed the border into complicit because of their delight whenever I sew them something with camo fabric!  

A while back I sewed them these two jersey tees, and the above photo was taken shortly after I sewed them.  You can see that David already has one hole in his shirt.  Probably from commando crawling across the rocks on the hillside or something.  

Camo pajama pants sewn by Skirt Fixation

The pants they are wearing were NOT made by me, but they have been worn through the knees already.  I’d like to think that if I had made them I would have used tougher fabric and double reinforced the knees.  It’s almost like the company that made them never had little boys.  Or never was little boys.  Or never was the kind of boy who prefers climbing over a fence to using a gate.

Camo pajama pants sewn by Skirt FixationI did however sew these boys some camo pajama pants recently however using the Oliver + S Parachute Sweatpants pattern.  That is, they were intended to be pajama pants, but I caught a boy coming in from outside the other day wearing them.  And they were covered with hay.  He was just rescuing his kitty from the top of the hay stack, he explained!

 

Camo pajama pants sewn by Skirt Fixation

If you look in this photo, you can see that after several months of self imposed “navy seal training” (which involves crab walking across hot pavement, belly dragging under wires, crossing precariously balanced logs, and jumping from the highest heights they can find, plus I don’t even want to know what else!) David’s shirt has acquired several more holes.  In fact it looks like a cheese grater.  If asked, he’d probably have some story about being clawed by a bear.  

Camo pajama pants sewn by Skirt Fixation

So whether they’re cuddling chicks, chasing dogs or wrestling with each other, these two boys can be found in camo clothes.  And I say let boys be boys; it’s healthy that way!

Camo pajama pants sewn by Skirt Fixation

For more information about the sweatpants I sewed for them, please check out my post over at CaliFabrics.  There you can also see the larger pair of camo sweatpants I sewed for Thomas and the two pairs of non camo sweatpants for the girls.  Plus the backstory on her shirt!

Leave me a comment…do you sew for boys?  With camo fabric?

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Janie Dress and Dressage Leggings Outfit

Janie Dress sewn by Skirt Fixation

Janie Dress sewn by Skirt Fixation

Annie’s fall/winter wardrobe gained another piece!  She’s been watching rather enviously the parade of Janie Dresses I’ve been sewing for Baby Tina, and when I told her it was her turn, she requested this pattern!  

Janie Dress sewn by Skirt Fixation

Inspired by the week 1 theme at Project Run & Play, Kid Designed – Momma Sewn, I asked Annie to design a fall outfit for herself.  She perused our fabric stash and came up with this liverpool floral knit fabric.  Because we had plenty of it, we both agreed the Janie Dress would be perfect.  The large scale print works well on a full circle skirt where as a tiny print would look busy, in my opinion.  

Janie Dress sewn by Skirt Fixation

For Annie’s tall and lanky frame, I blended the size 5 and size 12 patterns together!  At the waist I used the 5, and the size 12 for length and shoulder width.  Also, we used the whole width of the fabric on the circle skirt instead of using the size 12 length to get it as long as possible.  By the end of the winter, it’ll probably be right at the knee if Annie keeps growing like a weed!

Janie Dress sewn by Skirt Fixation

Because of her fond memories of this dress, Annie wanted the cowl version of the Janie Dress.  We decided a solid black knit fabric would be perfect for the cowl, both to separate the print from her face, and to match the leggings she designed for underneath.  

Janie Dress sewn by Skirt Fixation

For the leggings, we used the quick and easy version included with the Dressage Leggings pattern.  We sewed her a size 10 with size 12 length.  These fit Annie perfectly, and she was in desperate need of a new pair of black leggings for fall and winter.  This was the only picture I got where you can get a good glimpse of the leggings and I love the concentrated look on Annie’s face!

Janie Dress sewn by Skirt Fixation

Both of these patterns were quick and easy to sew.  Using our Brother 1034d serger, we completed them both (all except the hems) in short order.  Actually, the circle skirt is unhemmed because liverpool knit does not fray, and it was much less time consuming than hemming aaaaaalllllll the way around that circle!

Janie Dress sewn by Skirt Fixation

Liverpool knit fabric is interesting.  It’s thick like a double knit, but has a crepe like texture on the face.  This almost pebbled look and feel is quite unique.  

Hand sewn labels designed by Skirt Fixation

Oh, and I was quite pleased to be able to use the new labels I designed from Dutch Label Shop.  No more questions about what is the front on handmade clothes anymore!  If you’d like to get your own labels, use the code skirtfixation15 for 15% off your purchase until December 3rd.

Annie was quite pleased with her design and it’s so fun to bring her vision to life!  She’s a pretty good little designer, and we’ve planned some more projects in the future…stay tuned!

Affiliate links are used in this post.  If you click one of our affiliate links, we may make a few pennies at no extra cost to you.  Thank you for supporting our small sewing business!

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Three Ponte Camden Raglan Tees

Camden Raglan tees comparison by Skirt Fixation

Today I’ve got a huge comparison of these three different ponte fabrics over at CaliFabrics.  Please go check it out!

City Park Tee sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

Over at CaliFabrics, since it’s such an in depth discussion of the fabric, I don’t really get to share more about the pattern!  This is the Camden Raglan by Hey June Patterns.

City Park Tee sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

Since Annie has (once again!!!) outgrown all her long sleeve shirts from last fall and winter, she was the recipient of 3 new Camden Raglan Tees!  The other two I’m perfectly happy with (and so is she!) but this one has a few flaws.  Allow me to be a perfectionist and point them out to you!  First of all, I sewed the neckband on backward and the seam is in the front.  But Annie says she doesn’t care, so I’m not unpicking serger seams to sew it on the right way!  Secondly, I only had 1 yard of fabric, (which is plenty for a Camden Raglan Tee) but I was also squeezing out a pair of leggings for baby Tina from these three fabrics.  So on this one, I tried turning the sleeve on the cross grain, and they ended up being too tight for Annie from just above the elbow to the wrist.  We have since solved this problem by making them short sleeved.  And she has a sweater and several hoodies she can layer with it, so I guess all’s well that ends well, right?

City Park Tee sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

If I had to guess, I think this is Annie’s favorite of all 3 Camden Raglan tees because I’ve seen her wearing it with and layering it under everything!  It’s heavyweight ponte fabric, and so warm.

Camden Raglan tees comparison by Skirt Fixation

Here you can see all 3 Camden Raglan tees from the side.  Annie just loves this pattern, and we’ve sewn her so many versions including several dresses!

Camden Raglan tee comparison by Skirt Fixation

And here is the view from the back.  Once again, please head over to CaliFabrics to read all about my review of ponte fabric.  And leave a comment too!

Affiliate links are used in this post to really amazing patterns!  If you click on our links, we might make a few pennies at no additional cost to you, so thanks in advance, and congrats on buying yourself something awesome!

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Sew the Rainbow

Sew the Rainbow with Skirt Fixation

Earlier this summer, I did a bunch of kid sewing that I never shared here!  The inspiration was from the Project Run & Play Sew The Rainbow themed weeks.  (Please go check out Project Run & Play, it’s an online children’s sewing event that I am privileged to lead, and there are some fantastic things happening over there!  It’s why this blog is a little quieter than usual right now.)  Here’s how we decided to sew the rainbow…

Sew the Rainbow with Skirt Fixation

For red/pink week, both Annie and Thomas got t-shirts.  In fact, Annie sewed her own shirt!  She used the Camden Raglan pattern by Hey June Patterns, and was so delighted to whip up this little raglan tee for herself.  

Sew the Rainbow with Skirt Fixation

The fabric is Art Gallery Fabric knit leftover from this dress.  I couldn’t find it in stock, but this one is pretty similar and also an Art Gallery Fabric knit.

Sew the Rainbow with Skirt Fixation

Thomas also got a t-shirt.  For his we used buffalo plaid knit fabric (like this one) and he’s in heaven!  He’s been wearing it all summer.  We used the Shwin & Shwin Lennon Tee pattern.

Sew the Rainbow with Skirt Fixation

For orange week, Annie requested a nightgown.   We again used the Camden Raglan pattern as our base, but lengthened it into a nightgown length.   This fabric came from the Hancock Fabrics going out of business sale, but this gorgeous orange feather fabric would make a delightful nightgown!

Sew the Rainbow with Skirt Fixation

Then came yellow week!  Again, Annie got a new garment!  This time I sewed her a knit pencil skirt with shorts underneath.  We used the Jocole Pencil skirt pattern, and added the shorts from the Skipalong Skort underneath.  This fabric is also sold out (we were using up fabric from our stash for this exercise!) but here is a super soft, bright yellow, similar knit fabric.  

Sew the Rainbow with Skirt Fixation

Then came green week!  We’ve blogged both our makes for this week earlier.  You can see David and Lowell’s green camo rain jackets here.

Sew the Rainbow with Skirt Fixation

Also, I sewed a little sloth outfit for a friend’s new baby that totally falls into the green category and also things I haven’t blogged category!  I used the Seattle Skater Skirt pattern for the brown skirt, the Lollipop Leggings pattern for the leggings, and the Rosemary Raglan for the little tee.  Then I designed and added the darling sloth graphic using my Cricut Maker.

Sew the Rainbow with Skirt Fixation

And sort of bridging between green and blue weeks, Annie’s swimsuit is a turquoise/aqua color.  You can read all about it here.

Sew the Rainbow with Skirt Fixation

Then for blue week, we went sort of crazy.  In fact, we got stuck on blue week and still haven’t made it to indigo/violet week.  David and Lowell got swim trunks and rashguards which you can read about here.

Sew the Rainbow with Skirt Fixation

My biggest son got a pair of navy blue sweat pants.  We used some navy sweatshirt fleece, and the men’s Hudson Pants pattern.  As a little aside, he’s totally over the moon about a pair of sweatpants that fit his long, long, long legs!

Sew the Rainbow with Skirt Fixation

And then there was the whole blue patriotic parade of fabric that we sewed.  You can read all about those garments in this blog post.

Sew the Rainbow with Skirt Fixation

One reason this post took so long to get up is because we just never sewed any purple garment!  In fact, we’re still sewing with blue (as will be shown next week!)  But we did manage to sew some dresses that fit into the rainbow week theme, and you can read all about them in this blog post.

Thanks for taking time to read about our Sew the Rainbow garments!  It’s been quite a colorful summer around here.

Affiliate links are used in this post to fabric and patterns we use and love.  If you click on one of our links, we may earn a few pennies at no additional cost to you.  Thank you for supporting our small sewing business!

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1 Pattern, 3 Shirts – A Comparison

Union St. Tee sewn by Skirt Fixation

Recently, I used the Union St. Tee pattern from Hey June Patterns to sew 3 quite different shirts for my daughters and I.  It’s one thing we love about this pattern, the versatility.  And if you would like to read an in-depth comparison of the 3 fabrics I used, head over to CaliFabrics.

Union St. Tee

The first Union St. Tee I sewed was for Allegra.  She requested the scoop neckline and elbow length sleeves.  I’ve actually never made the scoop neckline before, and think it looks so nice on her!  The elbow length sleeves will help stretch this tee into fall wearing.  Allegra requested a semi-slouchy tee, so I made a size large and graded out to a size XL at the hips.  Also, I used the full bust adjustment front piece and it fits so nicely on her.  Finally, I added 1 extra inch of width at the shoulders, because although she is not as tall as Aria or I, she got that wide shoulder gene.   Her Union St. Tee is made from modal fabric.

Union St. Tee sewn by Skirt Fixation

The next Union St. Tee I sewed for Aria.  She requested the crew neckline and elbow length sleeves.  After she felt the camo linen jersey, she also requested a slouchy tee, so I made her a size L, and added 1” at the shoulders and 2” to the length.  Since this fabric doesn’t have much recovery, I used plain white jersey for the neckband.  I haven’t officially admitted it yet, but I think she’s taller than me.

Union St. Tee sewn by Skirt Fixation

And of course, I had to get in on the Union St. Tee fun!  I sewed the v-neck and raised it 1”, my standard adjustment for this pattern.  I added 1.5” to the length and also used the 1” broad shoulder adjustment.  To make this tee just right for fall wearing, I also chose the elbow length sleeve.  For fun, I added a striped pocket to this tee.  My Union St. Tee is made from double brushed poly fabric.  

Union St. Tee sewn by Skirt Fixation

In a side by side comparison (there are more of these over at CaliFabrics) you can see more of the differences in the 3 shirts.  One pattern, 3 different shirts, 3 happy wearers!

Affiliate links are used in this post, because we love buying fabric and patterns!  If you click on one of our affiliate links, we might make a few extra pennies at no extra cost to you.  Thank you for supporting our small business.  Be assured we only recommend and link to products we use and love!

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A Sweet, Sentimental Collar from Old Linens

Vintage Linen Collar sewn by Skirt Fixation

Today I’ve got a sweet, sentimental collar story!  When a fabric is listed with the title “Robin’s Egg Blue” and that’s the exact color of your baby’s eyes, there’s no question as to whether or not you’re going to get that fabric!  And the icing on the cake is that this is some of the nicest jersey I’ve ever worked with.  You can read my full review of the dress fabric over on the CaliFabrics blog.  But today I want to share with you about that sweet little collar made from vintage linen.

Vintage Linen Collar sewn by Skirt Fixation

Recently, we had the opportunity to help some dear friends of ours move to a new home.  This move was all about downsizing.  That meant having to disposition many belongings.  And if you’ve ever had to get rid of something sentimental, you know what an agonizing process this was for our friends.  

Vintage Linen Collar sewn by Skirt Fixation

Being the sweet, selfless friends they are, they tried to give many of their belongings to the people helping them with the moving process.  We all know that it hurts less to give things to people you know will love and care for them than to throw them away or send them to a faceless donation center.

Vintage Linen Collar sewn by Skirt Fixation

The problem with this plan for us was that with 8 kids and 2 adults in our home, we don’t need and don’t have room for many more belongings than we already have!  In fact, we have a sort of constant purging process in place around here.  But a few small things made it home with us, despite our best intentions to the contrary.

Vintage Linen Collar sewn by Skirt Fixation

One precious item we just couldn’t refuse was a box of vintage linens.  I mean fabric, right?  (The photo above shows what it looks like when you tell a toddler to twirl so you can get a shot of the circle skirt on her dress!  Toddler’s can’t twirl!!!)

Vintage Linen Collar sewn by Skirt Fixation

Plus, these are some pretty special linens.  There are hand embroidered items, and probably hand crocheted edges although I’m not an expert in that field.  One oval shaped linen had a note pinned to it with the words, “First embroidery I ever did pre-teen.”  But when we asked our friend, she said it was not her work but her mother’s!

Vintage Linen Collar sewn by Skirt Fixation

There are lace items too.  One problem is that in our day and age, linens like these are not used as they were originally.  Some of the vintage linens are of shapes and sizes we can’t even identify their original use.  But each one is gorgeous and clearly hand made.

A couple of the vintage linens have yellowing, as many old linens do.  One such one we decided to use as the collar for Baby’s new dress.  The delicate embroidery is encased between the two layers of collar, and featured on the tips.  It really adds such a beautiful touch to this darling dress!

So that is the story of a box of vintage linens, some dear friends and a collar on a robin’s egg blue dress.  Leave us a comment, what would YOU do with a box of vintage linens?

Dress: Janie Dress

Fabric: Robin’s Egg Blue jersey from CaliFabrics

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10 Ways to use a Cricut Maker for Apparel Sewing

10 Ways to Use the Cricut Maker for Apparel Sewing by Skirt Fixation

Today I’m sharing 10 amazing ways to use a Cricut Maker for Apparel Sewing.  This post was sponsored by Cricut, but all opinions are mine.  When Cricut introduced the Maker and it’s amazing rotary blade for putting virtually any fabric without a backer, it opened up a whole bunch of opportunities for those of us who love apparel sewing.  So let’s get started with the 10 ways to use a Cricut Maker for apparel sewing.

1-Baby Bloomers

Simplicity Baby Bloomers sewn by Skirt Fixation

Did you know that you can find complete sewing patterns on Cricut Design Space™?  It’s true!  I found these darling little chambray bloomers in the Design Space project center and sewed up a pair for my baby quicker than you can imagine!  Bloomers under her skirts and dresses are a go-to garment around here, and this pair will go super well with the little capsule wardrobe I’m sewing for her!

Simplicity Baby Bloomers sewn by Skirt Fixation

It was super duper easy to sew up these bloomers after the Cricut Maker cut out the chambray fabric and marked the pieces and notches using the fabric marking pen.  Note: the pattern says it is sized for a 6 month baby, but due to the elastic, it’s working fine for Baby who is 16 months.  Just note the weight and size.  And we used Baby’s measurements for the elastic, not the guide given.  We will definitely be sewing up more of these Simplicity Baby Bloomers!  You can find the project right here.

2-Headband

Headband sewing by Skirt Fixation

This darling headband is also a Cricut Design Space™ project.  The only change we made was to use knit fabric instead of felt because we didn’t have felt in the right colors we wanted.  But it’s sooooooo cute!  You can find the project here.

3-Graphic Tees

Patriotic fabric parade created and sewn by Skirt Fixation

This one is a crowd favorite for sure!  I created the patriotic tee above using my Cricut Maker to cut out the Sport Flex Iron On.  Although I do not have an Easy Press, many people report great success with using it to iron on their images to their tees.  You can read more about Annie’s outfit and grab that FREE cut file here.

4-Exterior Label Tags

Special tag for denim by Skirt Fixation

In my recent Denim Week series, I shared two leather and Kraftex tags I created using the Cricut Maker for the back of my denim skirts I sewed.  They add a very classy and special touch to any denim garment.

5-Interior Garment Labels

My friend Tami, from SewSophieLynn, shared how to make custom interior size labels for garments in this post.  Boy oh boy, did I need that information with all the different sizes I have going on around here with 8 kids!

6-Elbow and Knee Patches

The very talented Abby from Sew Much Ado used the Cricut Maker to add knee patches to her free baby pants pattern that we love!  Read all about it in this post.  You can also use the same technique to add elbow patches…which we love to do too!

7-Day of the Week Underwear

Kari from That’s Sew Kari created these perfectly adorable and practical day of the week underwear in this post.  How much more genius can it get?  She used her Cricut Explore Air 2, but of course you can use the Cricut Maker to do the same thing!

8-Removeable Collar

Amber of Amber Simmons used her Cricut Maker to create this fabulous Peter Pan collar.  It’s just the cutest thing ever!  We’d use it to layer under sweaters in the winter for just the right touch.  Read more about it in her post here.

9-Baby Shoes

These baby shoes were made with the help of a Cricut Maker!  Aren’t they about the most darling thing ever?  This project can be found in Design Space here.  The next person I know who has a baby girl is definitely getting these in their handmade care package!

10-Baby Dress

A complete baby dress for 3-6 months size!  This entire project can be cut out on the Cricut Maker.  Plus all the notches get cut out too, and any markings are marked.  Those are my least favorite parts of the project!  Did you know that you can find over 500+ digital sewing patterns and quilt blocks available from Simplicity®, Riley Blake™, and more (sold separately) through Cricut Design Space™?  And Design Space® software works for iOS, Android™, Windows®, and Mac® too.

10 Ways to Use the Cricut Maker for Apparel Sewing by Skirt Fixation

If you’re considering a Cricut Maker for apparel sewing, these are 10 options to get you started.  And also you might like to know the Cricut Maker offers the ultimate in cutting performance and versatility. Unlike all other cutting machines it has:

  • Bluetooth® wireless technology
  • Adaptive Tool System™ for professional-level cutting performance and expandability
  • Compatible with Washable Fabric Pen for marking pattern pieces (sold separately)
  • Cuts hundreds of materials, from the most delicate fabric and paper to matboard and leather
  • The ultimate in professional-level cutting performance and versatility

And more!  Leave us a comment, what apparel project would you sew with a Cricut Maker?

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This is a sponsored conversation written by me on behalf of Cricut. The opinions and text are all mine.