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Funny DIY Homeschool T-shirts with the Cricut EasyPress 2

Funny DIY Homeschool t-shirt tutorial by Skirt Fixation

Today we have a fun post for you and a tutorial on how to make your own funny DIY homeschool t-shirts.  

Funny DIY Homeschool t-shirt tutorial by Skirt Fixation

Homeschoolers often get taken very seriously, but really, they can be a fun and funny group of kids.  They have probably been asked all the same questions over and over again many times, (usually involving something to do with socialization or the lack thereof) and find them humorous.  Today we decide to have a little fun with it.  

“BEST student in my class” funny DIY homeschool T-shirt tutorial:

Funny DIY Homeschool t-shirt tutorial by Skirt Fixation

The 1st t-shirt we made declares Annie to be the BEST student in her class.  (Joke: she’s the ONLY student in her grade level!)  First we designed the graphic in Cricut Design space.  Here’s the link to the project if your star pupil needs a shirt like this too. 😉 

Funny DIY Homeschool t-shirt tutorial by Skirt Fixation

Next, we used the Cricut Maker to cut out the glitter iron on vinyl star with the word best.  (PRO TIP: remember to mirror your image before cutting out!)  Then we weeded it (this just means taking away all the parts of glitter vinyl we didn’t want attached to the shirt) using the Cricut Bright Pad.  It makes the job so quick and easy!

Funny DIY Homeschool t-shirt tutorial by Skirt Fixation

Then we used the Cricut Maker to cut out the other words, “STUDENT in my class” again remembering to mirror the words before cutting.  These words are cut from pink Everyday Iron On vinyl.  We like to use it because making sure your iron-on material sticks and continues to stick after many, many washes is paramount.  At Cricut, the quality of their iron-on materials and EasyPress are best-in-class.This is why they now have in place the StrongBond™ Guarantee on many of their iron-on materials. Cricut’s StrongBond™ Guarantee means that when this iron-on material is used as directed, you’ll be completely satisfied with the results. If not, they’ll replace it for free.  Everyday, SportFlex, and Glitter Iron-on are designed to outlast 50+ wash and dry cycles when used and applied as directed!  Weeding was quickly finished, and it was time to attach the words onto the shirt.

Funny DIY Homeschool t-shirt tutorial by Skirt Fixation

But 1st we needed a shirt pattern piece!  We used the Camden Raglan pattern by Hey June Patterns, one of Annie’s favorite shirts.  This very cute and appropriate note paper fabric is part of the CLUB back to school collection from Raspberry Creek Fabrics.

Before sewing the shirt together, we used the new Cricut EasyPress 2 to attach the graphics to the shirt.  Here are some things you will want to know about the new EasyPress:

  • Three unique sizes (6×7, 9×9, and 12×10) to suit every project (ours is the 9×9 and it was perfect for these shirts!)
  • Professional iron-on success in 60 seconds or less
  • Easy to learn, simple to use
  • Ceramic-coated heat plate means dry, even heat for flawless transfers
  • Faster heat-up time
  • Precise temperature control up to 400 F
  • Insulated, streamlined Safety Base keeps EP2 in protected resting position while also protecting crafting surface
  • Easy to read digital display
  • Fabulous raspberry color
  • USB port for firmware updates

Funny DIY Homeschool t-shirt tutorial by Skirt Fixation

After laying out our two pieces, we 1st pressed the “STUDENT in my class” words to the shirt.  This is because you can re-press over the top of Everyday Iron On, but not Glitter Iron On.  So we set the star aside and attached the other words first.

Funny DIY Homeschool t-shirt tutorial by Skirt Fixation

Cricut has this very helpful feature on their website so you can determine what times and temperatures to use on the EasyPress 2 depending on the type of iron on and the base material you are using.  And it tells you whether to peel of the backing when it’s warm or cool, a very important part to making sure the graphic lasts through many washes and wearings.

“I believe I can fly” funny DIY homeschool t-shirt tutorial:

Funny DIY Homeschool t-shirt tutorial by Skirt Fixation

The other shirt we sewed was for Thomas.  At his age, he wanted something a little sarcastic for his funny DIY homeschool t-shirt.  Motivational sayings cause major eye rolling, so this was his little joke.

Funny DIY Homeschool t-shirt tutorial by Skirt Fixation

We made this shirt in a very similar manner to Annie’s shirt.  Here is the project in Design Space if your sarcastic teenage son wants one too!

Funny DIY Homeschool t-shirt tutorial by Skirt Fixation

This time we used black Everyday Iron On.  The pattern for his shirt is the Lennon Tee pattern from Shwin and Shwin.  The paper airplane fabric is again part of the CLUB back to school collection from Raspberry Creek Fabrics.  To get the perfectly matching shade of grey for the front, I just used the reverse side of the airplanes fabric!

Funny DIY Homeschool t-shirt tutorial by Skirt Fixation

All right, now leave us a comment: Do you have sarcastic and funny kids?  Do you homeschool them?   What other Funny DIY Homeschool T-shirts should I make?

This post is sponsored by Cricut.  I received the Cricut EasyPress 2 in exchange for promotion.  All thoughts are my own.  Also, affiliate links are used to products we use and recommend.  If you click on one of our links, we may receive a few pennies at no extra cost to you.  Thanks for supporting our small sewing business!

This is a sponsored conversation written by me on behalf of Cricut. The opinions and text are all mine.

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Sew the Rainbow

Sew the Rainbow with Skirt Fixation

Earlier this summer, I did a bunch of kid sewing that I never shared here!  The inspiration was from the Project Run & Play Sew The Rainbow themed weeks.  (Please go check out Project Run & Play, it’s an online children’s sewing event that I am privileged to lead, and there are some fantastic things happening over there!  It’s why this blog is a little quieter than usual right now.)  Here’s how we decided to sew the rainbow…

Sew the Rainbow with Skirt Fixation

For red/pink week, both Annie and Thomas got t-shirts.  In fact, Annie sewed her own shirt!  She used the Camden Raglan pattern by Hey June Patterns, and was so delighted to whip up this little raglan tee for herself.  

Sew the Rainbow with Skirt Fixation

The fabric is Art Gallery Fabric knit leftover from this dress.  I couldn’t find it in stock, but this one is pretty similar and also an Art Gallery Fabric knit.

Sew the Rainbow with Skirt Fixation

Thomas also got a t-shirt.  For his we used buffalo plaid knit fabric (like this one) and he’s in heaven!  He’s been wearing it all summer.  We used the Shwin & Shwin Lennon Tee pattern.

Sew the Rainbow with Skirt Fixation

For orange week, Annie requested a nightgown.   We again used the Camden Raglan pattern as our base, but lengthened it into a nightgown length.   This fabric came from the Hancock Fabrics going out of business sale, but this gorgeous orange feather fabric would make a delightful nightgown!

Sew the Rainbow with Skirt Fixation

Then came yellow week!  Again, Annie got a new garment!  This time I sewed her a knit pencil skirt with shorts underneath.  We used the Jocole Pencil skirt pattern, and added the shorts from the Skipalong Skort underneath.  This fabric is also sold out (we were using up fabric from our stash for this exercise!) but here is a super soft, bright yellow, similar knit fabric.  

Sew the Rainbow with Skirt Fixation

Then came green week!  We’ve blogged both our makes for this week earlier.  You can see David and Lowell’s green camo rain jackets here.

Sew the Rainbow with Skirt Fixation

Also, I sewed a little sloth outfit for a friend’s new baby that totally falls into the green category and also things I haven’t blogged category!  I used the Seattle Skater Skirt pattern for the brown skirt, the Lollipop Leggings pattern for the leggings, and the Rosemary Raglan for the little tee.  Then I designed and added the darling sloth graphic using my Cricut Maker.

Sew the Rainbow with Skirt Fixation

And sort of bridging between green and blue weeks, Annie’s swimsuit is a turquoise/aqua color.  You can read all about it here.

Sew the Rainbow with Skirt Fixation

Then for blue week, we went sort of crazy.  In fact, we got stuck on blue week and still haven’t made it to indigo/violet week.  David and Lowell got swim trunks and rashguards which you can read about here.

Sew the Rainbow with Skirt Fixation

My biggest son got a pair of navy blue sweat pants.  We used some navy sweatshirt fleece, and the men’s Hudson Pants pattern.  As a little aside, he’s totally over the moon about a pair of sweatpants that fit his long, long, long legs!

Sew the Rainbow with Skirt Fixation

And then there was the whole blue patriotic parade of fabric that we sewed.  You can read all about those garments in this blog post.

Sew the Rainbow with Skirt Fixation

One reason this post took so long to get up is because we just never sewed any purple garment!  In fact, we’re still sewing with blue (as will be shown next week!)  But we did manage to sew some dresses that fit into the rainbow week theme, and you can read all about them in this blog post.

Thanks for taking time to read about our Sew the Rainbow garments!  It’s been quite a colorful summer around here.

Affiliate links are used in this post to fabric and patterns we use and love.  If you click on one of our links, we may earn a few pennies at no additional cost to you.  Thank you for supporting our small sewing business!

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1 Pattern, 3 Shirts – A Comparison

Union St. Tee sewn by Skirt Fixation

Recently, I used the Union St. Tee pattern from Hey June Patterns to sew 3 quite different shirts for my daughters and I.  It’s one thing we love about this pattern, the versatility.  And if you would like to read an in-depth comparison of the 3 fabrics I used, head over to CaliFabrics.

Union St. Tee

The first Union St. Tee I sewed was for Allegra.  She requested the scoop neckline and elbow length sleeves.  I’ve actually never made the scoop neckline before, and think it looks so nice on her!  The elbow length sleeves will help stretch this tee into fall wearing.  Allegra requested a semi-slouchy tee, so I made a size large and graded out to a size XL at the hips.  Also, I used the full bust adjustment front piece and it fits so nicely on her.  Finally, I added 1 extra inch of width at the shoulders, because although she is not as tall as Aria or I, she got that wide shoulder gene.   Her Union St. Tee is made from modal fabric.

Union St. Tee sewn by Skirt Fixation

The next Union St. Tee I sewed for Aria.  She requested the crew neckline and elbow length sleeves.  After she felt the camo linen jersey, she also requested a slouchy tee, so I made her a size L, and added 1” at the shoulders and 2” to the length.  Since this fabric doesn’t have much recovery, I used plain white jersey for the neckband.  I haven’t officially admitted it yet, but I think she’s taller than me.

Union St. Tee sewn by Skirt Fixation

And of course, I had to get in on the Union St. Tee fun!  I sewed the v-neck and raised it 1”, my standard adjustment for this pattern.  I added 1.5” to the length and also used the 1” broad shoulder adjustment.  To make this tee just right for fall wearing, I also chose the elbow length sleeve.  For fun, I added a striped pocket to this tee.  My Union St. Tee is made from double brushed poly fabric.  

Union St. Tee sewn by Skirt Fixation

In a side by side comparison (there are more of these over at CaliFabrics) you can see more of the differences in the 3 shirts.  One pattern, 3 different shirts, 3 happy wearers!

Affiliate links are used in this post, because we love buying fabric and patterns!  If you click on one of our affiliate links, we might make a few extra pennies at no extra cost to you.  Thank you for supporting our small business.  Be assured we only recommend and link to products we use and love!

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Phoenix Blouse with 3 changes

In my last post I mentioned that one reason I didn’t mind sewing a Phoenix Blouse for Aria was that I was sewing 2 at a time.  And of course the other one was for me!  Ever since I sewed up my wearable muslin Phoenix Blouse, I’ve been wanting more.

Phoenix Blouse sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

Having sewed a muslin, I knew there were just three changes I wanted to make.  Two I’ll definitely make again, and the other I won’t!

The first thing I wanted to do was to try the Phoenix Blouse with the flutter sleeves from the Amalfi Dress, just like on Aria’s blouse.  It is such a feminine touch!  And I absolutely adore wearing these sleeves.  They swoop and swish and flow and twirl with movement all their own!  I’ll definitely be adding these sleeves to a Phoenix Blouse again.

Phoenix Blouse sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

The 2nd change I make was to eliminate the slit in the front yoke.  I think I just wanted to see if it would still slip over my head without the slit.  It does, obviously.  It also raises the neckline a little for modesty reasons (think bending over and chasing little kids all day!)  Also, this fabric is quite busy, so I thought eliminating the slit would help simplify the blouse a little.

While I love this blouse due to the sleeves and the fabric, I probably won’t eliminate the slit again.  It just seems to take away from the style lines somewhat.

Phoenix Blouse sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

The final change was to take in the side seams a little bit.  I did this for Aria on her blouse, and it creates such a nice silhouette while still staying true to the boho feel of the blouse.  It’s still very loose and comfortable to wear, but has a bit of shaping.  This is a change I’ll be making again in the future.

Phoenix Blouse sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

This fabric is a poly crepe I got from Indiesew.  It’s currently sold out, but they carry very, very nice quality fabric, so I always keep an eye on what they have in stock.  If you’re specifically looking for poly crepe, here is a pretty selection.

Phoenix Blouse sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

Poly crepe is worth looking into, it’s inexpensive, lightweight, and oh the drape!  Poly crepe has a slight pebbled texture to it.  The one I got from Indiesew is slightly shiny on one side.  It washes well, and is easy to iron.  As the name suggests, it is polyester, so does not breathe as well as natural fibers.

Phoenix Blouse sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

I have been wearing this Phoenix Blouse with both this black skirt and this brown one.  What color would you wear on bottom with this blouse?  And also, have I convinced you it’s the Summer of the Phoenix Blouse yet?  (If not, stay tuned…)

Affiliate links are used in this post to fabric and patterns we use love.  We highly recommend them, and our lawyer recommends that we tell you that if you click on one of our links, we might make a few pennies at no extra cost to you.  We tried to explain to him that you love fabric and patterns and sewing as much as we do, but in the midst of his long legal mumbo jumbo explanation  we got lost and started sewing in our heads.  So here’s the disclaimer statement!

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The Summer of the Phoenix Blouse {part 2}

Phoenix Blouse sewed and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

A while back, I promised this was going to be the summer of the Phoenix Blouse.  So it’s about time for another post about the Phoenix Blouse, don’t you think?  Don’t worry, I’ll make up for it with 2 posts about it this week, okay?

Phoenix Blouse sewed and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

When Aria saw the Phoenix Blouse I sewed for myself, she “needed” one.  And I get it, I “need” a few more myself!  After trying on my Phoenix Blouse, she had some exact requests for her Phoenix Blouse.  She wanted the Amalfi Dress sleeves and for the Phoenix Blouse to be a little more fitted.  These were easy adjustments to make!

To make Aria’s Phoenix Blouse more fitted, we simply basted the sides of the size 6.  Then she tried it on inside out.  I pinned the sides to the amount of fitted-ness that she requested, and then I sewed up the side seams.  

Phoenix Blouse sewed and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

The Phoenix Blouse is made to have the sleeves from the Amalfi Dress fit, so that was an easy adjustment too.  Both patterns are designed by Hey June Patterns, and she deliberately made these two patterns work together.  We just used the size 6 sleeves from the Amalfi Dress pattern, and lengthened them a little so they hit right at Aria’s elbow after hemming.  

Phoenix Blouse sewed and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

Just like on my blouse, we used layers of blue lace on the front yoke.  It creates such a cute boho look! 

The fabric is rayon challis from Raspberry Creek Fabrics.  You can find it right here.  It’s perfectly soft and drapey and also cool to wear in hot weather.  Aria has gotten many, many compliments while wearing her new Phoenix Blouse.

Phoenix Blouse sewed and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

To go with her new blouse, Aria requested a new skirt.  She settled on a Runway Skirt made from black stretch sateen with black rayon challis godets.  

Because we were using woven fabric (and the Runway Skirt is designed for knit fabric) we decided to go up a size from where Aria was on the measurement chart.  This was a mistake because we ended up taking the skirt in at every seam (after these photos were taken.)  Next time we sew a woven Runway Skirt, we’ll just stick with the regular size.  The skirt is not designed with negative ease, so making it with woven fabric, or even stretch woven fabric is not an issue as there is a zipper in the back.  Lesson learned!

Phoenix Blouse sewed and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

While Aria can and does sew her own clothes, recently we’ve come to an agreement.  If she cuts out the fabric, I’ll sew it up for her…especially if I’m making two of the same pattern like I was this time.  But more on that in the next post…

Affiliate links are used in this post to products we use, love and highly recommend.  If you click on one of our affiliate links, we may make a few pennies for recommending that item to you.  Thanks and happy sewing!

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Sandbryce Skirt

Sandbryce Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

Meet my new favorite summer outfit.  This is the mash up of 2 patterns, the Sandbridge Skirt and the Bryce Cargos.  I’m calling it the Sandbryce Skirt.  I’ve been on a hunt for a good cargo skirt pattern, and finally decided to take matters into my own hands.  I ended up with a skirt I’m going to be making again ASAP so this one can get some rest.  Or at least not worn 3 times per week!

Sandbryce Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

Earlier in the year, Emily shared a tutorial over at Hey June Handmade on how to mash these two patterns but she did it the exact opposite of me!  So it’s not copying at all, is it?  She used the Sandbridge Skirt on top and the Bryce Cargo pants on bottom to make herself a pair of jeans.

Sandbryce Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

To create my Sandbryce Skirt, I laid out the pattern pieces for the Bryce Cargo pants first.  Then on top of them I overlaid the Sandbridge Skirt pattern pieces.  I lined them up the best I could.  On the front pieces, I matched up the zip fly parts.  

Sandbryce Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

For the back pieces, I matched the hip curves for the outseam.  Then I folded in the crotch triangles for the pants pattern on front and back.  As you can see on the front, the Sandbridge Skirt pattern piece is wider than the Bryce Cargo piece (on top of it.)  Because I was using stretch twill, I eventually decided just to go with the side seam of the Bryce Cargos so as not to mess up the pocket, and angled in from the hem to that point.

Sandbryce Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

As far as instructions went, I basically followed the Bryce Cargo steps, except where obviously I needed to follow the Sandbridge Skirt steps.  It worked out great!  The only change I might make next time is to take in the center back a little more at the top.  

Sandbryce Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

I made this Sandbryce Skirt knee length, just by measuring how long I needed it, and continuing the lines of the skirt down that far at the same angles.  

Sandbryce Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

You can see the insides of this skirt are very professionally finished, per the pattern instructions (on both patterns!)  

Sandbryce Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

Adding all the hardware (snaps) was a learning experience for me, but totally worth it!  Like I mentioned in my Denim Week series, the hardware is one of the things that makes a skirt look professional and not “homemade.”

Sandbryce Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

This fabric is stretch twill from JoAnn Fabrics in a color called Clay.  It is amazingly good quality, and very, very comfortable!  In fact, I’ve already picked up some in this khaki to make myself another Sandbryce Skirt.  And I really want to get it in this olive green color except my local store doesn’t have it right now.  (The price of this stretch twill online right now is ridiculously cheap!!!)

Sandbryce Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

Of course I had to make myself a new shirt to go with my new skirt.  I made myself the Santa Fe top using the most beautiful rayon spandex jersey from Raspberry Creek Fabrics.  It’s currently sold out, but they have a beautiful selection of other rayon spandex jersey fabric.

This is seriously my favorite outfit to wear, and I think Mr. Skirt Fixation likes it a little bit too!  

Sandbryce Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

Have you ever mashed up two patterns and ended up with an end result that was better (if possible!) than either of the patterns to begin with?  That’s the beauty of sewing your own clothes…you can make EXACTLY what you love every time!

Affiliate links are used in this post to patterns and fabric we use and love.  If you click on one of our links, we might make a little bit of money at no extra cost to you for referring you to that company.  Thanks for supporting our small business!

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Denim Details – Ways to make your garment special!

Denim Details: Ways to make your garment special from Skirt Fixation

And now, Day 4 of Denim Week, we get to probably our favorite part of sewing a denim garment…details!  If you’ve taken the time and effort to sew a detailed denim garment, you should absolutely make it special by adding some unique denim details.  We’ve found 7 different areas to add denim details to your garment, and we’ve got loads of examples of ways it’s been done in the sewing community.  Plus we’ve added 2 tutorials and 2 free cut files for you to use if you want on your denim garments!

Denim Details: Ways to make your garment special from Skirt Fixation

Denim Detail #1 Back Pockets:

This is probably the most noticeable way denim garments are personalized!  And, why not?  The back pocket is basically a blank canvas, waiting your design!  We’ve created 2 tutorials for you, a pleated back pocket and a pieced back pocket.

Pleated Pocket Tutorial:

Pleated pocket tutorial by Skirt Fixation

Step 1:  Fold, pin and iron horizontal rows of pleats until the pleated section is long enough to fit pocket pattern piece.

Pleated pocket tutorial by Skirt Fixation

Step 2:  Topstitch across pleats with topstitching thread

Pleated pocket tutorial by Skirt Fixation

Step 3:  Cut out pattern pocket pieces and attach to back as instructed in pattern.

 

There is a side view where you can see the cool texture the pleating creates.

Pieced Pocket Tutorial:

For this tutorial, we used the smaller size of the Goose Chase pattern by Jeli Quilts.  There are hundreds of paper piecing patterns available, and we can’t wait to use some more!  Be sure to show us if you’re inspired to use a paper pieced quilt pattern on your denim back pockets.

Pieced back pocket design by Skirt Fixation

Step 1:  Use paper piecing template and the front and back of fabric to create design.  We used both sides of the fabric so the finished pocket would have the same color value, just light and dark tones.

Pieced back pocket design by Skirt Fixation

Step 2:  Sew on extra denim to sides and top as needed to expand size of the pieced fabric.

Pieced back pocket design by Skirt Fixation

Step 3:  Cut out pocket.  Cut out another pocket piece from lightweight lining.  Fold the edges of the denim pocket over the lining pocket.  This is to protect the insides of the piecing.  Then, just attach to back as instructed in pattern.

Pieced back pocket design by Skirt Fixation

Funny story: I couldn’t decide if I wanted to topstitch around the flying geese or not, so I tried it to see what it looked like on one pocket.  Which do you like better?  See photos of the finished skirt below to see what I ended up with…

Back pockets from the sewing community:

Here are some amazing examples of back pocket personalization from the sewing community!  Click on each photo to be taken to their creation.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BimtZ5QBpJU/?taken-by=havinsewmuchfun

https://www.instagram.com/p/BKRVosKDRNX/?saved-by=skirtfixation

https://www.instagram.com/p/BSN6eOOg_yt/?saved-by=skirtfixation

 

Denim Details #2 Tags

There are a couple of ways to use tags in your denim creations.  The leather tag on the back waistband is a common element of denim garments.  We have 2 free cut files for the designs we used.

Special tag for denim by Skirt Fixation

For this tag, we used Kraft-tex paper (which is what is often used on ready to wear denim.)  Since the cutout details are quite small and wouldn’t be stitched in place, we used Aleene’s Okay-to-wash-it fabric glue.  We’re happy to report that it’s still just like new after much wearing and several washes!  You can get the FREE cut file project here.

Special tag for denim by Skirt Fixation

For this second tag, we used real leather and created this free cut file.  After cutting it out on our Cricut Maker machine, we simply topstitched it on.

Sandbridge Skirt by Skirt Fixation

You can see what a special, customizes skirt these details make!

Tags from the sewing community:

This first example is a different kind of tag on the inside that’s totally unique and amazing!

https://www.instagram.com/p/BjfWlxKhOD2/?saved-by=skirtfixation

https://www.instagram.com/p/Bjuxay2BBqh/?tagged=ashjeans

Denim Detail #3: Inside pockets, facing and trim

Sandbridge Skirt by Skirt Fixation

Inside the denim garment, there are several fun places to tuck in vibrant fabric!  The pocket lining, the bias trim, the inside of the waistband, and so on.  It’s like a secret smile and a small celebration tucked inside!

Insides from the sewing community:

The preview photo above only shows the awesome back pocket design, but over on Instagram, you can scroll through the photos to see the insides too!

Denim Detail #4: Fabric and Topstitching choices

Sandbridge Skirt sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

The combination of fabric and topstitching fabric makes the garment look so different!  On the Sandbridge Skirt we sewed above, we used contrasting thread.  If we had used white, or a navy contrasting thread, it would look different again.

Sandbridge Skirt by Skirt Fixation

 

When you use contrasting topstitching thread, it really stands out and makes a statement.  Matching topstitching thread results in a totally different look.

Fabric/topstitching combinations from the sewing community:

https://www.instagram.com/p/BVAoJmpgMsc/?saved-by=skirtfixation

https://www.instagram.com/p/BeiM5xAF4o0/?saved-by=skirtfixation

Denim Detail #5: Hardware

Sandbridge Skirt by Skirt Fixation

Yes, installing the hardware can be intimidating.  But it’s worth it!  If you can make an incredibly complex garment from denim, you can install the hardware!  I think it’s scary because this step is the last one, and you’re doing it to the finished garment!  If you mess up…all your hard work and time is wasted, right?  But there are loads of helpful tutorials and videos, and you should always practice (buy enough extra hardware!) first.

Hardware from the sewing community:

https://www.instagram.com/p/BfRaB_1hDxW/?tagged=sandbridgeskirt

https://www.instagram.com/p/BWyi38zB-Kw/?tagged=sandbridgeskirt

Denim Detail #6: Distressing

We don’t have any experience with distressing denim, but we’ve seen it done well.  Here are some helpful tutorials:

How to distress denim from Bernina

Sew Guide how to make your own distressed jeans (15 ways!!!)

Imagine Gnats distressing denim tutorial (photos of different techniques on different denims)

Patterns for Pirates (tips and good advice!)

Distressing denim from the sewing community:

Moje prvni Morgan jeans jsou hotové a jsem z nich nadšená! Moje šicí sebevědomí šlo nahoru stejně jako chuť pustit se do dalšího kousku. Tyhle první jen vzbudily chuť experimentovat s prošíváním a tvarem kapes, a možná velikostí. Třešničkou na dortu je ten barevný vnitřek, který je hlavně pro mě a radost z jejich oblékání. My first #morganjeans are finished! My sewing confidence went up as well as the need for another pair. This first piece only provoked the desire to experiment with the top stitching, pocket shape and maybe with the size as well. The cherry on the top are the colourful insides seen just by me when putting them on. #nofearnewjeans #boyfriendjeans #imakemyownclothes #closetcasepatterns #morganjeans #memadewardrobe #novédžíny #siti #vlastnorucneusito #sijemesinasebe #svadlenka #sijeme #šijemedžíny

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#heyjunehandmade went and did it, again, adding another amazing pattern to the collection! And, I had the pleasure of testing it! *squee* Released 7/20/17! The #SandbridgeSkirt is a casual skirt in two lengths with traditional five-pocket styling, a functional zip fly, belt loops, and contoured waistband in sizes 2 – 22. (Check their blog for a sew-along!) https://www.heyjunehandmade.com/product/sandbridge-skirt/?affiliates=55 Go to fb.me/sewrumba to see more of my work. #heyJune @sewrumba @heyJunehandmade #handmade #sewing #stayathomemom #SAHM #Atlanta #Georgia #crafts #craftaholic #skirts #skirt #PDFPatterns #sewingpatterns #DIY #makeallthethings #sewinglove #happyplace #Ididthis #Imadethis #photography #hobby #sewrumba

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Denim Detail #7: Pattern Hacks

Sandbridge Skirt by Skirt Fixation

I used the Sandbridge Skirt pattern and made it into a maxi skirt.  To do this, I simply grabbed a denim maxi skirt from my closet that I wanted to replicate the shape of.  As I was cutting out my skirt, I extended the length of the skirt starting beneath the pocket bag and angled it gradually out and down.  To get the shape I wanted, I laid the RTW (ready to wear) skirt out on my fabric, and used the angle and length as my pattern from below the pocket bag and down to the hem.  The result is exactly what I was hoping for!

Sandbridge Skirt by Skirt Fixation

Pattern Hacks from the sewing community:

So here’s a fun fact. I am such a terrible blogger that I forgot to hit ‘publish’ on Monday’s Overalls post until yesterday afternoon, so it has become Wednesday’s overalls post, and also here is a photo of me in front of a wall. As you do. Also, swipe for a flatlay complete with succulents. As you do. Anyways: Ginger Jean Dungaree hack now on the blog- for real this time! . . . . @drapersfabrics @closetcase.patterns #gingerjeans #patternhack #closetcasepatterns #overalls #modernmaker #sewcialists #berninanz #madebyme #isew #handmadewardrobe #makersgonnamake #makerlife #sewingblogger #sewingtall #sewnz #sewistsofinstagram #pinkhair #ootd #imakemyownclothes #diywardrobe #sewingaddict #rtwfast2018 #succulents #flatlay #diystyle #youcanhackit

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More Denim Details Inspiration:

We’ve got a Pinterest board dedicated to Denim Details here.

Day 1: Introduction and Cone Mills Denim Giveaway

Day 2: Giant List of Denim Fabric, Supplies and Resources

Day 3: Giant List of Denim Patterns Classes and Tutorials

Denim Week Discount

Right now, the Sandbridge Skirt is the featured pattern over at Hey June Patterns, so use the code “Sandbridge15” to get if for 15% off!

Denim Details: Ways to make your garment special from Skirt Fixation

Affiliate links are used in this post to products we use and love.  IF you click on our affiliate links, we may make a small commission for recommending the product to you.  But don’t worry, it won’t cost you anything extra!  Thanks for supporting our small business.

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Me Made May 2018 Week 5

Phoenix Blouse sewed and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

I know, I know.  We’re into June and I’m still sharing things from May.  But, I’ve been busy, and I wanted to complete my round up of Me Made May skirt outfits.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BjUyDhrh7lQ/?taken-by=skirtfixation

This skirt is the Sandbridge Skirt pattern from Hey June Patterns.  It’s truly lovely, and I’m so excited to share the details of this (and the other Sandbridge Skirt I sewed!) that I’ve planned a whole entire week dedicated to denim coming at you the last week of June.  There’s going to be a giveaway, stunning details, inspiration, resources and more.  So stay tuned!!!  This skirt is sewn with stretch denim.  The place I bought it is sold out, but here’s a very similar stretch denim.

The shirt is a Union St. Tee from Hey June Patterns.  It’s made from cream knit fabric (I can highly recommend this fabric!) and I wear it with everything!  This shirt pattern is reviewed here.

It may appear as if I’m wearing the same skirt as yesterday, and while that skirt is awesome enough to wear 2 days in a row, this is a different skirt. When I have a pattern that I love, I often sew more than 1 at a time. Do you batch sew? Anyway I’m wearing it today so I can get it blogged and share the amazing goodness of them both. And the huge differences. . . Shirt pattern: #seafarertop by @sewmuchado Shirt fabric: #fleetandflourishfabrics by @maureencracknell for @artgalleryfabrics Skirt pattern: #sandbridgeskirt by @heyjunehandmade Skirt fabric: stretch denim from @raspberrycreekfabrics . . #mmmay18 #memademay #denimmaxi #handmadewardrobe #memademay18 #sewmodest #sewingtall #sewingforme #sewsewsew #skirtsewing #sewingskirts #isewmyownclothes #sewinglyfe #dreamskirt #waituntilyouseetherest #rcfmonthlymakes #wearefabrics #feelthedifference

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This is the other Sandbridge Skirt I sewed.  And I can’t wait to show you the differences between the two skirts!

The top is the Seafarer dolman sleeve top pattern by Sew Much Ado.  It’s sewn using Fleet and Flourish knit fabric by Art Gallery Fabrics.  You can read our review of this top here.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BjZx0dYB7Jb/?taken-by=skirtfixation

And you probably recognize this outfit from the other day…it’s the Phoenix Blouse by Hey June Patterns sewn in rayon chambray fabric.  The blue I used is sold out, but here’s black rayon chambray.

And the skirt is the Jocole Pencil Skirt sewn in Arizona After knit fabric from Art Gallery Fabrics.  Full review of both these garments here.

https://www.instagram.com/p/Bjca1Pah6_k/?taken-by=skirtfixation

This skirt is the Simple Pencil Skirt (reviewed here) in textured knit fabric.  (similar fabric here)

The top is a Lane Raglan made with a black micro rib knit modal fabric.   (similar fabric here)

Happy Hey June June! We’re all decked out in @heyjunehandmade to celebrate the occasion, are you? . . Top pattern: #unionsttee by @heyjunehandmade hacked to a peplum just for this occasion! Top fabric: buttery soft bamboo jersey from @blackbirdfabrics Skirt pattern: #sandbridgeskirt by @heyjunehandmade Skirt fabric: stretch denim from @raspberrycreekfabrics Dress pattern: #camdenraglan by @heyjunehandmade lengthened to a dress. Dress fabric: #pandaliciousfabrics by @katarinaroccella for @artgalleryfabrics . . #heyjunejune #heyjunepatterns #youcanhackit #isewmyownclothes #memadeeveryday #handmadewardrobe #wearefabrics #sewingforgirls #sewingtall #sewingforme #makersgonnamake #sewersgonnasew #sewistsofinstagram #seamstressonduty✂️ #bamboojersey #blackbirdfabrics #feelthedifference #sewingisselfcare #sewingblogger #skirtfixationsews2018 #skirtsewing #sewingskirts

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Technically, this was June 1st, but it was another outfit I shared on Instagram!  I’m wearing a Union St. Tee that I added a peplum to.  This peplum top is one of my favorite shirts, so I added another one to my wardrobe.  I used bamboo knit fabric from Blackbird Fabrics, but they’re sold out.  Good thing I found a similar fabric here for you!

Annie is wearing her Camden Raglan dress from this post.  It is made using Art Gallery Fabric Pandalicious knit fabric.

That wraps up Me Made May 2018 for us!  Since it’s not the 1st year we’ve participated, we didn’t get any huge new revelations, but used the opportunity to add to and subtract from our wardrobe.  How about you?  Did you participate in Me Made May?

Affiliate links are used in this post.  This means that if you click on one of our affiliate links, we might make a few pennies if you make a purchase.  But no worries, it won’t add anything to your bill, it’s just a little commission we make from the merchant.  Thanks for helping support our small sewing business!

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Flutter Sleeve Tutorial

Slash and spread flutter sleeve tutorial from Skirt Fixation

Today I’ve got a quick and easy flutter sleeve tutorial for you.  And the beauty of this is that you can do this to any pattern that has a sleeve!  I used the Union St. Tee by Hey June Patterns, but you can use any pattern with sleeves.

This method is a slash and spread method, but the beauty of it is that you keep the original length of the armscye, so you don’t have to adjust your shirt pattern piece, only the sleeve.

Flutter Sleeve Tutorial:

Slash and spread flutter sleeve tutorial from Skirt Fixation

Start by cutting into your sleeve pattern piece from the bottom, up to 1/2″ away from the top.  Spread each of these pieces apart the same distance.  I used a 1″ space between my pieces, buy you could certainly do more.  Then I cut around my new pattern piece and also extended the length of the sleeve piece by 2″ for more flair.

Slash and spread flutter sleeve tutorial from Skirt Fixation

That’s it!  Super easy and fast, and of course, fluttery!!!

Slash and spread flutter sleeve tutorial from Skirt FixationSlash and spread flutter sleeve tutorial from Skirt Fixation

If you’d like to read more about the fabric we used, and also the skirt we made to go with our flutter sleeve top, head over to CaliFabrics.  There’s a little story about why this skirt pattern ended up working perfectly after basically failing the first time around.

Affiliate links are used in this post to products we use and love.  Thank you for supporting our small business when you click on them.  It means a lot to us, and doesn’t cost you anything extra!

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The Summer of the Phoenix Blouse

Phoenix Blouse sewed and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

One of my favorite pattern designers did it again!  Yes, she released a new pattern (the Phoenix Blouse,) yes it’s amazing, yes, it fits great.  But the thing I’m referring to is that she made me try a new style again!  

Phoenix Blouse sewed and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

The Phoenix Blouse by Hey June Patterns is a cute a causal boho style top.  It can be cropped and has bell sleeves or can be made sleeveless.  And, to make this blouse even more perfect, you can use the flutter sleeves from the Amalfi Dress on it.

Phoenix Blouse sewed and reviewed by Skirt Fixation 

The fabric suggestions are very lightweight, drapey fabric like rayon, gauze, lawn, poly, or silk.  I used rayon chambray, and it’s perfection.  But you’d better believe I’m going to be making the Phoenix Blouse in some of these other substrates.  In fact, prepare yourself to see a lot of Phoenix Blouses around here because I’ve just officially declared this the summer of the Phoenix {Blouse!}

Phoenix Blouse sewed and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

The Phoenix Blouse can be made in 11 sizes from 2 to 22.  I sewed a size 6.  If I make this in a slightly less drapey fabric, I’ll probably size down due to the ease.  But for this fabric, it’s perfect!  This rayon chambray is from CaliFabrics, (sold out now) and we also used it for Annie’s Laramie Top.

The only change I made to the pattern was to add 1.5” to the width of the shoulders, my standard adjustment for Hey June Patterns.  It’s not the patterns, it’s my gigantically wide shoulders.  I did not add any length, and sewed the longer (not cropped) version, which ended up the perfect cropped length for my tall frame.  

Phoenix Blouse sewed and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

Some special details on the Phoenix Blouse include a front and back yoke.  The front yoke can be embellished like you see here, and the back yoke has the cutest pointed shape.  Lace can be used on the front yoke.  I only had lace trim, and not a large piece of lace in the color I wanted to use.  So I sewed it in strips across the front of the yoke, overlapping slightly each layer.  I think it worked out perfectly!  

Phoenix Blouse sewed and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

For the ties, I just used the top of the gathered lace trim that I’d cut off to make the lace lay flat.     I might shorten them just a little bit because when they are untied, they seem a little long.  And as she was photographing this outfit for me, Aria suggested that I could add another set of ties halfway down the front of the opening for a fun detail.  I’m going to do that right away!

The style lines of this blouse are so unique and flattering.  The rayon chambray is light, flows beautifully, and breathes well, so I plan to wear this all summer long!

Phoenix Blouse sewed and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

Of course I had to make a skirt to go with the Phoenix Blouse.  I sewed a Jocole Pencil Skirt in knit Art Gallery Fabric from the Arizona After line designed by April Rhodes.  I think the two work perfectly together, and I also want to try the Phoenix Blouse with an a-line skirt.  

That’s all for today!  If you want to try a beautiful new pattern that will make you feel amazing, try the Phoenix Blouse!

 

Affiliate links are used in this post to products we use and love and support!  Thank you for support our small business by clicking on them.  It means we might make a few extra pennies at no additional cost to you.