Posted on

Lane Raglans Round 3

Lane Raglan Sew/Wear Off round 3 by Skirt Fixation

Lane Raglan Sew/Wear Off round 3 by Skirt Fixation

Alrighty then!  I promised you another Lane Raglan sew/wear off, so today’s the day!  When I made my black new Lane Raglan from the new pattern I absolutely love, love, loved the new fit.  And apparently so did Allegra.  She tried it on and refused to take it off and return it to me until I agreed to sew one for her.

Lane Raglan Sew/Wear Off round 3 by Skirt Fixation

So now we have 2 black Lane Raglans exactly the same except for the little ribbon I sewed inside the neckband of mine to differentiate between them.  But a boost post of a sew/wear off of two black new Lane Raglans would be quite boring, right?

Lane Raglan Sew/Wear Off round 3 by Skirt Fixation

So I made myself another one to add some variety.  I wish I would have taken a photo before I threw my old Lane Raglan pattern away, but I compared the new and old pattern pieces and they are completely different.  This new Lane Raglan pattern was completely revamped.

Lane Raglan Sew/Wear Off round 3 by Skirt Fixation

I really admire the persistence of Adrianna, the genius behind Hey June Handmade Patterns.  I mean, as Skirt Fixation readers know, this pattern was very good and very much loved by one and all!  But Adrianna wasn’t satisfied because of a few little issues so she stuck with it until she created the perfect pattern.

Lane Raglan Sew/Wear Off round 3 by Skirt Fixation

We will be really surprised if there are any more updates to this pattern because it’s perfect now.  But we were pretty sure it was perfect before too!  We will keep sewing Lane Raglans because they are so awesome.  Now to decide which version to sew next!

Lane Raglan Sew/Wear Off round 3 by Skirt Fixation

These two are the elbow sleeve, curved hem version.  If you’re not already a proud new Lane Raglan owner, you can get the pattern here.  No affiliate link, just major fan girls!  Also, we’re in love with the new Camden Raglan pattern by Hey June Handmade for juniors.

Lane Raglan Sew/Wear Off round 3 by Skirt Fixation

Fabric for my and David’s shirts from Hancock Fabrics.   The coral is leftover Art Gallery Knit fabric from making Annie’s leggings.  Fabric for Allegra’s (and my other Lane) came from JoAnn Fabrics.  I can’t link to it because I’m not sure which black knit fabric on their website it is.  I just walked the knit aisle at JoAnn’s feeling every black knit until I found the one with the softest hand that was 100% cotton.  It also happened to be the most expensive…  Feeling it is the best way I’ve found to get the right kind of knit fabric.  If you have to buy knit fabric online for your first time sewing with knit fabrics, use a knit from Art Gallery Fabrics.  They have so many solid and patterned options, and their knit will guarantee your first time sewing with knits turns out well.  Plus, I’ve found Art Gallery knit fabric to be very durable with no pilling.  You can find it many places, but the widest selection can probably be found at Hawthorne Threads.  Do you have any tips for buying knit fabric online?

Posted on

Black & White Refashion and the updated Lane Raglan

Mini skirt refashion by Skirt Fixation

It’s been quite a while since I’ve sewn one of my favorite kind of skirt refashions for myself.  But I’m not sure why because they are so fast and easy and comfortable!

Here’s what I started with:

Mini skirt refashion by Skirt Fixation

And by using my own tutorial, I made myself a new skirt!  I’m such a maxi skirt lover; it’s totally a byproduct of being 6 feet tall.

Mini skirt refashion by Skirt Fixation

 

Things I love about this kind of refashion: All the hard work is already done.  No waistband to sew, no pockets to install, no muslin to make, no fitting and fitting and fitting, and NO hemming!

Mini skirt refashion by Skirt Fixation

Really I don’t have too much to say about this skirt, just this: if you haven’t refashioned one of these for yourself yet, DO IT!

Mini skirt refashion by Skirt Fixation

Now onto the shirt!  This is the NEWLY released Lane Raglan pattern by Hey June Patterns.  It’s no secret I’m a fan of anything Adrianna, the genius behind Hey June Patterns, creates.  But we’re very loyal to the Lane Raglan, pulling it out whenever we need a comfortable basic.  We’ve had a Lane Raglan sew/wear off Round 1 and Round 2 when the pattern was updated to include thumbholes and a hoodie.  And we’ve also hacked it into a cardigan.

Mini skirt refashion by Skirt Fixation

So, I have to admit I was a little hesitant to try the newly updated Lane Raglan pattern due to loving it so much and knew that the fit had been altered on the latest update.  Well!  After sewing up the new update, here’s where the old pieces are!

Mini skirt refashion by Skirt Fixation

Just for the record, this is the 3rd one I’ve made.  So yeah, there will be a Lane Raglan sew/wear off Round 3 coming soon!  For this one I used the elbow length sleeves and shortened them a little bit for summer.  I’d like to say it was intentional, but the fact of the matter is I didn’t have enough fabric to go the whole length!  Funny story: I was really using up scraps to make this wardrobe basic, and the front and one sleeve are from leftover bamboo cotton from making this skirt, while the back and other sleeve are leftover from making this skirt!  But they’re both the same shade of black, so it’s all good!

Mini skirt refashion by Skirt Fixation

I also used the new scooped hem, which I really love.  I mean, I love the banded hem, but I think this one is going to be in constant rotation this summer.

Mini skirt refashion by Skirt Fixation

Last note:  Annie, my 7 year old was the photographer for this photo shoot! She told me how to pose, where to stand and was very serious about it all!  I guess because we’re so often on different sides of the camera she was really excited about shooting this one for me. I have to say she did pretty good, although I think her perspective makes me look even taller, if possible!

Mini skirt refashion by Skirt Fixation

Posted on

Lane Raglan Cardigan

Lane Raglan Cardigan hack tutorial by Skirt Fixation

Lane Raglan Cardigan hack tutorial by Skirt FixationI promised you a tutorial on how to turn the Lane Raglan pattern by Hey June Handmade into a cropped, 3/4 length sleeve, cardigan. It’s really quite easy, so let’s get started.

First of all, you need to cut out your front pattern piece one size larger than you usually wear. The other thing you need to do before sewing is make your length adjustments. The length adjustments are really quite easy and don’t need photos to explain. Simply shorten the sleeves and the front and back pieces to the length you want them to be. Then add the cuffs and waistband as instructed in the Lane Raglan pattern instructions.

Lane Raglan Cardigan hack tutorial by Skirt Fixation
The button up front can be done two different ways, either before or after the garment is constructed. We changed it to a cardigan after sewing the Lane Raglan as instructed because we thought it made the neckband easier to deal with.

Lane Raglan Cardigan hack tutorial by Skirt Fixation
Step 1:
Cut the finished Lane Raglan up the front. The easiest way to do this is to lay your front pattern piece on top of the garment.

Lane Raglan Cardigan hack tutorial by Skirt Fixation
Step 2:
Add a piece of interfacing inside both fronts about 1” wide by the length of the front.

Lane Raglan Cardigan hack tutorial by Skirt Fixation
Step 3:
Fold over the interfaced part, along the edge of the interfacing, press, and edge stitch it in place.
Step 4:
Sew buttonholes and buttons. We chose to sew double buttonholes because we just love the sweet, vintage look of it.
If you were going to change it to a cardigan before sewing the Lane together, you would cut the front in 1/2 and apply interfacing as pictured above. The you would attach the neckband and waistband starting and ending at the fronts of the cardigan. Then, fold over and sew as instructed above.

Lane Raglan Cardigan hack tutorial by Skirt Fixation
So there you have it! Pretty easy way to make yourself a cropped, 3/4 length sleeve cardigan from your Lane Raglan pattern. And if you didn’t hear, the Lane Raglan has gotten (another) update! The first update included a hood and thumbholes. You can see our versions of that update in this blog post. As if it wasn’t pretty much the most awesome pattern ever, the new update includes options for a curved hemline, elbow length sleeves, 3/4 length sleeves, and a long hemmed sleeves with no band. The upper chest area and sleeves were slimmed down and the shape of the raglan sleeves were changed slightly for a more flattening shape. Also, there is the ability to make a full bust adjustment.

Lane Raglan Cardigan hack tutorial by Skirt Fixation
To see the original Skirt Art post we made this version of the Lane Raglan for, go to this post.  We used heavenly French Terry Fabric (Aruba Blue) from JoAnn Fabrics. (affiliate link)   To purchase your own Lane Raglan pattern from Hey June Handmade, go here.  It’s on sale for until 11:59 pm MST for only $7.50 which we think is a screaming good deal!

 

Posted on

Girl At Piano {Living Skirt Art}

At The Piano painting by Vladimir Volegov brought to live by Skirt Fixation for their Living Skirt Art series. Check them all out!

Your favorite skirt series is back today with a living interpretation of stunning painting by Vladimir Volegov.  After you have enjoyed our Living Skirt Art, be sure to visit Cassie at Little Lizard King this month’s guest contributor, and see which piece of skirt art Cassie chose to replicate.  You won’t be sorry you did!  (Sneak peek at the end of the post.)

At The Piano painting by Vladimir Volegov brought to live by Skirt Fixation for their Living Skirt Art series. Check them all out!

Usually we turn to the masters of long ago for inspiration for our Living Skirt Art series.  But today, our featured artist is still living.  Vladimir Volegov was born in Russia and began painting at the tender young age of 3!  From painting portraits in the streets of Barcelona to exhibitions in Russia, his home country, the paintings of Vladimir Volegov are known far and wide.  After you’ve seeing his vibrant use of color and his realistic depictions of people, it’s pretty obvious why his paintings have such allure.  He currently works with the American publishing house Soho Editions.  His website (and complete beautiful gallery) can be viewed here.

At The Piano painting by Vladimir Volegov brought to live by Skirt Fixation for their Living Skirt Art series. Check them all out!

Although many, many of Vladimir Volegov’s paintings depict females in skirts, we chose to bring his painting At The Piano to life today.  Originally painted in 2008, this is an oil painting.  To recreate that beautiful flowing white skirt, we refashioned two skirts into one.  Aria didn’t necessarily want a white skirt, but we decided if it gets stained, or she wants a different color, we can give it a dye bath.

At The Piano painting by Vladimir Volegov brought to live by Skirt Fixation for their Living Skirt Art series. Check them all out!

For the girl’s top, we hacked one of our favorite patterns, the Lane Raglan, into a cropped, 3/4 sleeve cardigan.  Tutorial coming soon, really!  The heavenly French Terry Fabric (Aruba Blue) is from JoAnn Fabrics. (affiliate link)

At The Piano painting by Vladimir Volegov brought to live by Skirt Fixation for their Living Skirt Art series. Check them all out!

Aria is teaching herself to play the piano, and it is really a pleasure to listen to.  I love to listen to her play the piano because she pours her whole heart into the piece she is playing, and it’s so moving to hear her play.

In Summary:

Painting: At The Piano

Artist: Vladimir Volegov

Model: Aria

Photography: Audrey

Skirt: refashioned skirts (tutorial here)

At The Piano painting by Vladimir Volegov brought to live by Skirt Fixation for their Living Skirt Art series. Check them all out!

As always, check out our Skirt Art (Paintings) and Skirt Art (Illustrations) boards on Pinterest. Any suggestions on which piece of skirt art we should be inspired by next?

Now here’s your sneak peek and link to Cassie’s living skirt art.   Click on the photo to be transported!

Living Skirt Art interpretation

Posted on

New Year, New Hoodie

Hoodies for the new year sewn by Skirt Fixation

Two days ago we were recruited to play along with the Katy Perry New Year’s party going on over at Sewing Stadium.  I had never heard of or seen Katy Perry, so some frantic Google searching ensued.  I discovered Katy Perry is a colorful singer with a passion for fancy style.  Here’s my last minute interpretation of what Katy Perry might be wearing on New Year’s Day.

Hoodies for the new year sewn by Skirt Fixation

Happy New Year!  If you celebrated the new year Katy Perry (or any rockstar) style, today you’re going to need a hoodie and a pair of sunglasses.  But, Katy being Katy, it’s not going to be just any plain old hoodie…nope!  It’s going to be Katy-fied.

Hoodies for the new year sewn by Skirt Fixation

So what exactly does a Katy-fied hoodie look like?  Well, it’s not plain, our research showed Katy doesn’t do plain.  The hoodies we saw her wearing were fancy, bling-ed up, shark infested, made from fur or velvet; in a word, Katy-fied.  So we asked ourselves, if Katy could sew, what patterns or fabrics would she use?

Hoodies for the new year sewn by Skirt Fixation

And naturally we turned to our Lane Raglan pattern, with extra options, of course for Aria.  The floral fabric is from Girl Charlee.  Here’s a little secret.  The Lane Raglan pattern requires a yard of fabric for each fabric you’re using.  Last year we discovered a way to get a Lane Raglan from 1/2 a yard by piecing the front and back pattern pieces.

Hoodies for the new year sewn by Skirt Fixation

This time we discovered a new way to get the front and back pieces from 1/2 a yard.  If your fabric has 4 way stretch and a non directional print, simply orient the pattern pieces horizontally rather than vertically.  Did you guess that’s what we did here before we explained it?

Hoodies for the new year sewn by Skirt Fixation

We added the hood because a superstar has to have something to hide behind after a long night like New Years Eve.

Hoodies for the new year sewn by Skirt Fixation

My hoodie is the Jasper Sweater by Paprika Patterns.  As you can see in the photos, you can make the Jasper Sweater out of plain, un-fancy fabric, and there’s no covering up the fancy element.

Hoodies for the new year sewn by Skirt Fixation

All the special little details make this pattern a winner.  Welt pockets, princess seams, those buttons, the hood.

Hoodies for the new year sewn by Skirt Fixation

And if that wasn’t enough, this pattern can be made into a dress, with a collar and epaulet.  Definitely Katy worthy.  I made this from blue sweatshirt fleece from JoAnn Fabrics.  I’ve been living in it ever since I sewed the last stitch.

Hoodies for the new year sewn by Skirt Fixation

Want to see more Katy Perry fun?  Follow along below:

New Year’s Eve

Blog Host: Becca at Sewing Stadium
Cassie at Lily Shine Boutique
Miranda at Inspinration
Starly at Sew Starly

New Year’s Day

Ajaire at Call Ajaire
Candice at Candice Ayala
Shelly at Sew Shelly Sew
Jeanine at The Crafting Fiend
Audrey at Skirt Fixation

Hoodies for the new year sewn by Skirt Fixation

Posted on

Sewing A Button Up Shirt – Tips, Tricks, Tutorials & More

Everything you need to know about sewing a button up shirt.

Recently I took on the rather insane project of making 4 Marco shirts for my oldest son.  He has outgrown the 2 I made him last year, and requested some more.  Since I reviewed the Marco shirt pattern then, I thought I’d share things I’ve learned about making button up shirts.

Everything you need to know about sewing a button up shirt.

So here’s the post you need to read before you begin sewing a button up shirt.  If you love these tips, be sure to check out Adrianna’s post today over at Hey June Handmade for even more button up shirt tips not included here.

Tips for sewing a button up shirt:

  1. take it slow

Or maybe tip number 1 should be don’t attempt to sew 4 at one time!  After I got started on this project, I realized I would need sewing friends to cheer me on if I was ever going to finish, so I created the hashtag #thereallybigshirtevent on Instagram. But I digress.  Take it slow.  Don’t expect to get this done in one hour, one day or maybe even one week!

2. muslin

You really want a project this detailed to be one you (and the recipient) to love when you’re finished.  So make a muslin first.  This part IS really quick- you only need to cut the front, back and sleeve pieces.  Just whip them together and check the fit.  Make adjustments, and then get onto the good fabric.  (More on good fabric in a minute.)

3. pattern matching matters

Let's play find the pocket...
Let’s play find the pocket…

Before you cut into your good fabric, take a few minutes to think about pattern matching.  This is really important.  Pattern pieces you really need to plan before you cut: fronts to each other, fronts to back, button placket to front, pockets.

pattern matching on a button up shirt by Skirt Fixation

And if you get really, really crazy about pattern matching, you can get the button placket to match up.  Might need aspirin after this attempt though.

4. wide seam allowances

Be careful your seam allowances don’t get too narrow, even if your pattern recommends it.  You really don’t want to go back and restitch cuffs, collar, yokes after they’ve come apart because of tiny seam allowances.  Ask me how I know.  Once you’re done, you’re going to want to be DONE!

5. topstitch everything

Top StitchingTopstitching adds a professional finish, and reinforces those seam allowances to stay in place.  It also hold the seam allowances where they need to be for a clean cut while wearing.

Tools for sewing a button up shirt:

Recommended tools for sewing a button up shirt from Skirt Fixation

  1. glue stick

A glue stick will become your best friend.  Seriously.  Pins can’t hold those tiny fiddle-y pieces together half as good as glue.  It won’t gum up your needle, I promise.  Remember I sewed 4 at one time and experienced no gumming.

2. good quality fabric

I know I’m sounding like a broken record here, but you really want a project this in depth and detailed to last a long time.  Using good quality fabric ensures longevity.  When I couldn’t find a white shirting fabric good enough locally, I bought a high quality sheet with 600 thread count.  I really could notice the difference between this and the cheaper quality flannel I compromised on one of the shirts.

3. rolled hem foot

Those bottom hems are tiny, and a rolled hem foot will make your job lots easier.

4. good quality pattern

A pattern that teaches you as you go, with tips and tricks from a knowledgeable author.  Suggested patterns in a minute.

Tricks for sewing a button up shirt:

  1. pattern matching doesn’t matter

“Wait a minute, you just said…”  Yes, there are places pattern matching is pretty important, but there are also places you will not be able to match the pattern even if you’re a pattern matching genius.  These are those pieces: yoke, cuffs, collar stand, collar.

Fabric placement options for yokes

So what to do?  You have options; cut those pieces on the bias, a different direction, use fabric without a pattern, or just don’t sweat it.

2. add a tag

If you’re adding a tag to the yoke or collar stand on the inside, do this BEFORE you start sewing the pieces together, that’s the way the professionals do.

3. use contrast fabric

Possible contrast fabric placement on button up shirts

There are a couple of places you can sneak in fun fabric, the inside collar stand, the inside yoke and inside the cuffs.  Just pay attention to which way you are attaching them so they end up on the inside.  Not that’d I’d know anything about that. *cough*

4. Interfaced piece away from feed dogs

When you’re sewing two pieces together and one of them is interfaced, say the two collar pieces, place the one without interfacing down against the feed dogs when you are sewing.  It will be just a little bit stretchier than the interfaced piece, but if you have it against the feed dogs, there will be no puckers when you’re finished.

5. add tiny buttons

How to add collar buttons to a button up shirt from Skirt Fixation

Maybe your recipient prefers a button down collar.  Just add a small button hole at the corners of the collars.  Cut them open, poke through to make a mark in the desired spot, and sew on a small (smaller than 1/2 inch) button.  Follow the same procedure to add a button to the button placket on the sleeve.

Tutorials for sewing a button up shirt:

If you get stuck, or you just can’t visualize the next step, try these amazing tutorials:

Best patterns for sewing a button up shirt:

Once again, a good quality pattern makes all the difference in frustration levels and finished products.  Here are some we can personally recommend:

Beside these 4 button up shirts I sewed for my oldest son, I’ve made myself a couple of button up shirts this year.  It’s getting easier with the above tips, tricks, tutorials and patterns.  During the time I was sewing these 4 shirts, I became obsessed with all things button up.  All ready-to-wear button ups were fair game for my studies.  Mr. Skirt Fixation has been my biggest cheerleader all along.  He got me to sew my first button up shirt, and always encourages me to improve.  For example, he sent me this link.  Then I realized just how far I have yet to go…

To be continued!

Remember to check out Adrianna’s post today over at Hey June Handmade for even more button up shirt tips.  And leave your tips for sewing a button up shirt in the comments.