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Free Patterns for March {Project Sew It}

Skirt Fixation sews up free patterns for Project Sew It

For March’s Project Sew It challenge, both Aria and Audrey sewed up FREE patterns for meeting the “bottoms” project.  (Project Sew It is a monthly inspirational sewing challenge created by Celina of Petit a Petit and Family.)

Skirt Fixation sews up free patterns for Project Sew It

Audrey’s Free Pattern Make:

Today’s post makes me really, really happy!  You see, about 6 years ago I had to throw away my favorite pair of yoga pants.  They were the only pair I’d ever had, I slept in them every single night, and they’d developed holes in some very conspicuous places.  But I’m sure you’ve had a favorite garment and know how hard this was for me, right?  Well, these specific yoga pants had lasted me about 10 years which probably justified the $80 I paid for them from a specialty tall company.  But since then I’ve been too cheap to put out another $100 bucks (price has gone up!!!) and have missed them ever since.

That all changed when Hey June Handmade published the Mountain Pose Pants pattern.  Did I mention it is a free pattern?  Yes.  I’m a huge fan of Hey June patterns as anyone who has been around her any time knows!  It’s the quality and professional results that you can achieve by sewing these patterns.

Skirt Fixation sews up free patterns for Project Sew It

For other tall ladies who want to know, the inseam of the Mountain Post Pants is 32”, and at the recommendation of Adrianna (the designer behind Hey June Handmade) I split up the additional 4” I needed to reach my 36” inseam by adding 2” at the knee on the shorten/lengthen line and 2” at the hem by continuing the flair at the bottom.  You may notice I didn’t hem these pants…I’m waiting to see if the double brushed poly fabric shrinks any more before hemming…or maybe I’m just reveling in a pair of yoga pants that are too long!!!

Skirt Fixation sews up free patterns for Project Sew It

And then there is the fabric I used.  If you have your ear tuned to the sewing world, you’ve heard lots and lots of chatter about double brushed poly knit fabric.  I wanted to know what all the fuss was about and ordered some wine colored double brushed poly knit from CaliFabrics.  In all the reviews I’ve read about double brushed poly, the author comments that they’d like to wrap themselves up in the fabric it’s so soft.  So I figured this fabric might make me a good pair of yoga pants to sleep in.  Let me tell you in a word: YES!

So now you know why this post makes me so happy…I’ve regained my favorite pair of yoga pants, possibly even better than the original pair due to the double brushed poly fabric.

Aria’s Free Pattern Make:

This month I was wanting to go with an easy pattern, partly because we have been pretty busy so I didn’t get around to starting my skirt until pretty late, and partly because next month is will probably be doing a bit more complicated pattern.

Skirt Fixation sews up free patterns for Project Sew It

I decided on Melly Sew’s Easy T-Shirt Skirt Tutorial because I wear the skirt Mom made me all the time! I started with a t-shirt my older brother no longer wanted.  This tutorial is SUPER easy! I had a lot of fun, partly because I didn’t even have to rip anything, and I was able to do it completely by myself!

Skirt Fixation sews up free patterns for Project Sew It

The hardest part about this skirt was probably the waistband because of the amount of stretching I had to do while sewing it.  I made a few changes to it as well.  I made the waistband a little wider so I can wear it lower down instead of on my waist, and I made the pockets deeper.  I always go for deeper pockets!  The pocket fabric is Birch Organic’s flight leftover from this dress.   Anyway, I’m really glad I made it and I will be wearing it all the time!

See you next month for the dress challenge…both of us are feeling really challenged even thinking about it!  Also, affiliate links are used in this post for really awesome products you should try…we love them and think you will too, that’s why we’ve included the links.  But legal powers that be want you to know we might make a few pennies if you click one of our affiliate links…

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Blouses for February {Project Sew It}

Project Sew It February challenges sewn by Skirt Fixation

Today Aria and Audrey are sharing our makes for the Project Sew It February prompt – blouse.  (Project Sew It is a monthly inspirational sewing challenge created by Celina of Petit a Petit and Family.)  Audrey took the opportunity to treat herself to something she’s never had before, and Aria added a much needed item to her wardrobe.  Here they are with their makes.

Audrey’s Flannel Cheyenne Tunic:

Flannel Cheyenne tunic sewn by Skirt Fixation

Well once again I am not modeling my own clothing, but hopefully next month I will be!  For February’s blouse prompt, I turned to my favorite button up pattern and made myself a flannel Cheyenne tunic.  I can’t remember ever having a flannel shirt in my life, and I am absolutely in love with how this one turned out!  I CANNOT wait to be able to try it on myself!

Flannel Cheyenne tunic sewn by Skirt Fixation

I sewed the Cheyenne Tunic in the popover view B.  I adore the fit of the first Cheyenne tunic I made, and knew no fit adjustments would be needed for this flannel version.

Flannel Cheyenne tunic sewn by Skirt Fixation

For the fabric, I fell in love with this Robert Kaufman mustard and gray flannel fabric that I found at Raspberry Creek Fabrics.  It sewed up like a dream because it’s a very stable flannel.

Flannel Cheyenne tunic sewn by Skirt Fixation

I turned the button placket, pocket and back yoke pieces on the bias like a true flannel check shirt.  It think it adds so much awesomeness to this Cheyenne!  Last time I used voile for the sewing this version of the Cheyenne tunic, my maternity version is from a chambray, and this one is flannel which I think speaks very well to the versatility of this pattern.

Flannel Cheyenne tunic sewn by Skirt Fixation

Aria told me that this flannel Cheyenne Tunic is very warm.  The wind was blowing and it was a cold day when we took these photos, but she said she couldn’t feel the wind through the shirt!  Now by the time I can probably wear it, summer will be upon us and I will have to wait for fall weather, but at least I’m prepared!

Aria’s Drapey Rayon Seafarer:

Seafarer top sewn by Skirt Fixation

I really enjoyed making this month’s challenge! It was a SUPER quick sew, and I was able to do it in one day! I have made the Seafarer once before, but it was with a heavy weight knit.  I still wear it too, but recently Allegra gave me one of the Seafarers Mom made for her (not blogged!)  I love it!  One of my favorite parts about it is it is a light weight knit and a larger size, thus making pretty drapey and super comfortable!

Seafarer top sewn by Skirt Fixation

I was looking for light weight fabrics when I came across this super pretty purple Sew Classic Spandex Knit Fabric from JoAnn Fabrics!  It turns out we have nearly four yards of it! (Hopefully I can make something else out of it!)

Seafarer top sewn by Skirt Fixation

The most difficult part of this was the neckband. I tried to sew it on the first time, but i didn’t stretch it anywhere near enough, so I had to unpick it, *sigh*, and mom helped me pin it.  After that everything went really smoothly!

Seafarer top sewn by Skirt Fixation

This Seafarer Top is definitely my best attempt at sewing with light weight knits!  I’m hoping to do  more with lighter weight knits and looking forward to the next challenge!

Project Sew It February challenges sewn by Skirt Fixation

Affiliate links are included in the post for fabric and patterns we REALLY love!  If you click on one of them, you just might end up owning some fantastic products too…and we might earn a few pennies at no extra cost to you.

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Maternity Cheyenne Tunic Tutorial

2 tutorials from Skirt Fixation on how to make the Cheyenne Tunic suitable for maternity wear

Before I start Handmade Baby posts, I have one final maternity post for you.  A while back, Sarah from The Crazy Tailor suggested I should figure out how to hack the Cheyenne Tunic pattern to make it suitable for maternity wear.  As is usual with a sewing challenge, my mind worked on the problem until I finally figured out a solution…for each view!

2 tutorials from Skirt Fixation on how to make the Cheyenne Tunic suitable for maternity wear

To keep myself motivated to get the project done, I challenged Emily of @enjoyful_makes on Instagram to a sew off because she’s a fellow fan of Hey June Handmade and also expecting a baby.  We were each to take a Hey June Handmade pattern and hack it for maternity wear.

2 tutorials from Skirt Fixation on how to make the Cheyenne Tunic suitable for maternity wear

Let’s start with View A, the full button front.  The trick was deciding where to add the ease to allow for a rounded belly.

2 tutorials from Skirt Fixation on how to make the Cheyenne Tunic suitable for maternity wear

Step 1: Cut apart the front pattern piece below the bottom of the bust.  For me this was on the shorten/lengthen line.  If I were to do it again, I could even go an inch or so above that line.  Cut out the top half as normal, just adding seam allowance to the bottom of the piece.  When you cut out the bottom half of the pattern piece, cut out 3 extra inches across the front and add the seam allowance to the top as well.  I also added length to the bottom of the tunic, but this was probably not necessary.

2 tutorials from Skirt Fixation on how to make the Cheyenne Tunic suitable for maternity wear

Step 2:  Make pleats to gather in the extra 3 inches.  I made 3 pleats, each facing away from the center front, located in the center of each front piece.  Alternately, you could make 1 box pleat.  You just want your pleats/gathering to end up drawing in the extra 3 inches you added.

2 tutorials from Skirt Fixation on how to make the Cheyenne Tunic suitable for maternity wear

Step 3:  Sew the front and bottom pieces together so you have a whole front piece.  To make the Cheyenne Tunic last the entire pregnancy, sew these 2 pieces together WRONG sides together.  This will make the inside of your shirt look as pretty at this seam as at the rest of the shirt.  After you have the shirt completed, sew a ribbon or tie over the top of this seam covering up the exposed edges and dangling off the side seams.  This will allow you to wear the shirt at all stages of pregnancy, included the smaller months as the ties can draw in the extra width as you grow.

2 tutorials from Skirt Fixation on how to make the Cheyenne Tunic suitable for maternity wear

I did not do this on my shirt because I am nearing the end of my pregnancy.  So I sewed the top and bottom halves of the fronts together RIGHT sides together.  I pressed the seam up and zigzagged the raw edges on the inside.  Then I finished assembling the front pieces according to the pattern.

2 tutorials from Skirt Fixation on how to make the Cheyenne Tunic suitable for maternity wear

And there you have it…a maternity Cheyenne Tunic, View A.  I often wear this one with one of my maternity Runway Skirts.  I made the Cheyenne in black stretch sateen from JoAnn Fabrics.  I love this fabric for the Cheyenne Tunic very much, and will probably make myself another non maternity version in the fall!

2 tutorials from Skirt Fixation on how to make the Cheyenne Tunic suitable for maternity wear

Now for View B…which is super, super simple.  This is the maternity Cheyenne tunic hack I actually figured out first.

2 tutorials from Skirt Fixation on how to make the Cheyenne Tunic suitable for maternity wear

Step 1:  Cut out the front piece as shown.  The center front will be 3 inches away from the fold.  Cut down the front down to the “cut here for placket” marking.  At that point, pivot and cut out to the fold of the fabric.  Again I added length to the tunic length which was not necessary.  But I’m very tall, so it ended up okay.

2 tutorials from Skirt Fixation on how to make the Cheyenne Tunic suitable for maternity wear

Step 2:  Sew 2 gathering stitches just below the bottom of the placket.

2 tutorials from Skirt Fixation on how to make the Cheyenne Tunic suitable for maternity wear

Step 3:  Gather this very tightly.  You probably won’t be able to get it exactly back to the original shape, but the bottom point of the placket will cover up the gaping part.

2 tutorials from Skirt Fixation on how to make the Cheyenne Tunic suitable for maternity wear

Easy-peasy, and you have a View B maternity-ized Cheyenne Shirt!  The fabric from this one came from Hancock Fabrics going out of business sale and indigo Robert Kaufman chambray union fabric leftover from this skirt.

2 tutorials from Skirt Fixation on how to make the Cheyenne Tunic suitable for maternity wear

This tutorial can probably be used with any button up shirt pattern, but I definitely recommend the Cheyenne Tunic pattern from Hey June Handmade.  All the seams are beautifully finished on the inside and it’s such a lovely, professional shirt!

Affiliate links are used in this post, but only to products which I’ve personally used and loved!  If you click on them you too will find something you love…and I might make a few pennies!

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Aria’s 4H Sewing Project

4H sewing project by Skirt Fixation

This year 2 of us chose sewing for a 4H project.  You can read about Annie’s project here.  Today Aria is sharing her 4H sewing project.

This year for 4-H I did a three-part sewing project that included a shirt, a skirt, and a jacket. All three were made from varying weights of knit.

4H sewing project

The Veronika Skirt

This was made from a heavy knit from JoAnn Fabrics that I have used before and is super awesome! I made it for All The Skirts: Megan Nielsen & Imagine Gnats.  You can read our full review here.

4H sewing project by Skirt Fixation

The Halifax Hoodie

For the jacket I used a lighter French Terry for the first time.  I am happy to say that even though it was a lighter knit it was really easy to use!  The Halifax Hoodie from Hey June Handmade is a really nice sew up as well!  I used the third option with a zipper, pockets, and a hood.  The instructions were easy to follow but I was still really glad to have Mom’s help, especially when I did the pockets, zipper, and hood because it was my first time doing any of those!  I followed the instructions and it made my firsts easy ones!  The first thing I sewed was the pockets.  These were pretty easy except for the trying to keep them straight and sew through a lot of layers at one time, so I still think they are a bit crooked yet…  The next thing I did was the zipper.  This was completely different from anything I had ever done before.  I put a lot of pins in to hold it straight, went slow, and had Mom to help me!  I was pretty impressed by how well it turned out and how easy it was!  The last ‘difficult’ thing I did was the hood.  I had pretty much no trouble assembling it, but attaching it to the rest of the jacket was the difficult part.  There were a lot of layers, but when I attached the binding to enclose the seam allowances it looked pretty good!  The rest, compared to this was really easy!  The French Terry was super fun to work with and I really like the finished result!

4H sewing project by Skirt Fixation

The Lane Raglan Shirt

This was not my first Lane Raglan by Hey June Handmade that I sewed, but it was the first with a lightweight fabric that I made.  This fabric was pretty difficult to cut and sew, and I’m not really impressed with the result.  At this point, we were also having difficulty with the machine sewing using a double needle, so that didn’t help much either.  I really liked the simplicity of the pattern last time I made a Lane Raglan, but this time with the lightweight knit, it really hindered progress a lot.  I sewed the neckband on wrong and had to pick it out, which left a lot of holes.  Something happened on the sleeves, and there I had to sew some tucks in the shoulder, but the rest of the shirt turned out ok.

I really enjoyed sewing the skirt and the hoodie, but I did learn that I probably shouldn’t be sewing too much on lighter knits yet!

4H sewing project by Skirt Fixation

The lady who judged my sewing project at the county fair said she didn’t have any experience sewing with knits, but when my project went to state fair, the judge had some very helpful comments. One of them was on the hoodie, to try and line up the seam under the arm a bit better. I’d really like to sew another Halifax Hoodie sometime.

Thanks for sharing your 4H sewing project Aria!  Affiliate links are used in this post…to feed our sewing habits!

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Maternity Lane Raglan

Maternity Lane Raglan

Maternity Lane Raglan

Halfway there is a good time to make an announcement, right?  After I finished sewing the Wild Things vests, Aria kept telling me I needed to take a break and sew something for myself before I started my next difficult project (sewing jeans for my boys: follow along on Instagram to see my progress.)  How could I resist something as persuasive as that?  The only problem was…a growing waistline, and no patterns that worked.  Then I remembered the very intelligent Adrianna, the designer behind Hey June Handmade, had created a tutorial on how to modify the Lane Raglan for maternity wear.

Maternity Lane Raglan sewn by Skirt FixationAfter digging through my stash, I grabbed some mustard knit fabric from Art Gallery Fabrics, leftover from this Aster Cardigan, and some blue brush strokes stripe fabric from Cali Fabrics, leftover from making this skirt.

Maternity Lane Raglan sewn by Skirt Fixation

I used her tutorial to make a maternity Lane Raglan with only 2 changes.  I added 6” instead of 4” to the length of the front because I’m tall like that!  And then I used one size larger on the front piece and my regular size for the back and sleeves.  And you know what?  I love it!!!  A maternity shirt with the sleeves long enough?  Plus, comfortable, with wide enough shoulders and long enough to cover my bump the whole nine months?  Unheard of unless I wanted to pay a whole bunch of money!  So of course I made a second one.

Maternity Lane Raglan sewn by Skirt Fixation

On the second maternity Lane Raglan, I made one more slight change; I widened the width of the neckband after seeing someone else do it on Instagram, and it’s pretty cool too.   For this second one I grabbed more fabric from my stash, a charcoal bamboo knit from Cali Fabrics, leftover from this skirt, and a floral fabric from Girl Charlee that I’ve used on this skirt and this cardigan.  The floral fabric has 2 way stretch and fits a little tighter, so it might not make it the whole 9 months.  But we’ll see.

Maternity Lane Raglan sewn by Skirt Fixation

There are some clothes in my regular wardrobe that would probably work for some or most of the pregnancy, but I like to put away all my “regular” clothes and only wear maternity clothes when I’m pregnant.  Then after I give birth, it’s sort of like my birthday too with all the new clothes I get to wear again!

Maternity Lane Raglan sewn by Skirt Fixation

So after making these two maternity Lane Raglans, I did something drastic: I cut off all the sleeves on all my maternity tops that were too short and hemmed them short sleeve length.  Because this pregnancy, I don’t have to settle for maternity tops that don’t fit right!  I can make myself all the maternity Lane Raglan tops that I want!

Affiliate links are used in this post.  This is because I totally love and completely think everyone should sew up a Hey June Handmade item for themselves!  Your world with be revolutionized…

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Sante Fe Top Review

Sante Fe tops sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

Sante Fe tops sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

I’ve got a new favorite top, to sew and to wear! It’s the Sante Fe by Hey June Handmade. Since I love everything I’ve sewn from this company, I was pretty sure the Sante Fe was going to be a win too. Just to be safe I made a muslin first. I used some charcoal bamboo knit fabric from Cali Fabrics.

Sante Fe tops sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

This fabric is light, and swingy, and just perfect for this pattern.  I had never sewn a neckline with binding instead of a band, and I really like the clean finish. The cuffs on the arms have a similar clean finish. In fact, everything on the inside of this shirt is so clean and finished that I accidentally wore it inside out the other day…and no one noticed!

Sante Fe tops sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation
I made view C and the only change I made for the muslin was to lengthen the dolman sleeves by about 2 inches to accommodate for my wide shoulders.

Sante Fe tops sewn and reviewed by Skirt FixationLike all Hey June Handmade patterns we’ve sewn, this one is easy to follow.  The illustrations are drawn and the instructions are clear and complete.  It can be made in 7 sizes from XS to 2X.  There are 6 different variations you could make.

Sante Fe tops sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

After making this muslin, I decided to make another Sante Fe Top the next day! The only change I made for fit was to raise the neckline by about 1 inch and shorten the binding accordingly. I used some cheap knit fabric I picked up at Hancock Fabric’s going out of business sale. It’s lightweight and only has two way stretch, which makes it another great fit for this pattern.

Sante Fe tops sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

For a little Anthro-esque touch, I added a strip of blue lace down the front seam. I polled my sewing friends on Instagram before adding it, and there was overwhelming support for this idea. One of my sewing friends suggested adding the lace to the raglan sleeves of view F, and since I absolutely love this idea, I guess I’ll be making another Sante Fe Top soon!

Sante Fe tops sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

You might have noticed I left both the hems of these Sante Fe Tops raw edges.  This is for 2 reasons.  1: knit fabric doesn’t fray, so no hemming needed.  2: my double needle is currently in time out for not meeting my expectations for hem perfection.  I knew the situation wouldn’t improve with thin fabrics.

Sante Fe tops sewn and reviewed by Skirt FixationHere’s what I love about the fit of the Sante Fe top: it hugs your curves, and then flares out for a looser fit around the waist and hips. The result is about the most comfortable shirt ever. I’ve been wearing one or other of these every week!
So if you’ve got some cheap lightweight knit fabric laying around that you purchased before you knew what you were doing when buying knit fabric (not that I’d know anything about that, ahem!) turn it into some Sante Fe Tops! You can thank me later.

Oh, and the Halifax Hoodie is currently the featured pattern which means it’s on sale, so grab it too while you’re at Hey June Handmade.  You’re going to need it this fall!

Affiliate links are used in this post.  I would have been using them on all Hey June Handmade posts before this, but I just recently realized they have an affiliate program!  I’m just telling you this in case you are opposed to helping support my fabric habit, and don’t want to click on any links.

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Annie’s 4H City Park Tee Dress

Young girl sews her own dress for 4H project!

Young girl sews her own dress for 4H project!

Annie sewed a fun project for 4H this year.  Last year she sewed a skirt, and every year the child is supposed to show advancement of skills.  Now, in her level (K-2,) this isn’t a requirement and everyone gets a blue ribbon no matter what they create.  But we decided it was a good opportunity for Annie to learn some new skills.

Young girl sews her own dress for 4H project!

Adrianna just released the City Park Tee, and then did a series of tutorials on how to make the City Park Tee into a dress.  I showed the 3 looks to Annie and she chose the classic straight tee dress.  I asked Annie to share what she remembered/loved from making her City Park Tee dress, and here’s what she said:

We made it 20 inches longer than the longest size which was just above my ankles.  We used the City Park Tee into a dress using a tutorial from Hey June Handmade.  The neckband was pretty tricky but I put lots of pins in it.  It has different options for sleeves, but I used the short sleeve option.  I chose this fabric because brown looks better than light colors on my body.  We used almost all of this fabric that we had.  My favorite part of making this dress is getting to wear it.

Young girl sews her own dress for 4H project!

Just for reference, Annie is 8.  This was her 1st time sewing with knit fabric.  I kept her in constant supervision, sometimes helping to steer the fabric through the machine.  We also talked about each step of the directions and what it meant.  The City Park Tee is a very easy pattern to follow, and has illustrations for each step.  It really wasn’t too hard for Annie to understand and picture most steps before she started sewing it.

Young girl sews her own dress for 4H project!

Annie now regularly haunts our knit fabric stash plotting and planning the next City Park Tee or Dress she’s going to make!  I’m so proud of her, and if you are too, leave a comment!

Affiliate links are used in this post so we can feed Annie’s new sewing addiction!!!

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Ombre Syrah Skirt

Ombre Syrah Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

Ombre Syrah Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

As in years past, I made myself a skirt for my birthday.  And of course, it’s my new favorite skirt to wear!  But this time it’s for a very good reason.

Ombre Syrah Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

I sewed the Syrah Skirt pattern (full pattern review here.)  I chose it for this fabric because it has a lining, and this fabric is rather thin.  What is that fantastic fabric, you ask?  I got it at JoAnn Fabrics, here’s the direct link:  Knit Fabric-Double Border Ombre Slub Knit Mint (affiliate link)

Ombre Syrah Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

It’s a knit fabric, with a double border ombre knit.  To get a full length maxi skirt with the ombre running vertically down the skirt, I had to lay my Syrah pattern pieces horizontally across the grain of the fabric.  This worked out because the fabric has 4 way stretch.  This fabric is perfect for a Syrah Skirt.  It’s flow-y and swishy and has awesome movement which you can’t really tell from still photographs.  But this skirt seriously makes me want to walk barefoot along the beach!  I put in my request to Mr. Skirt Fixation…

Also, here’s my secret to get that soft, dreamy, minty look: I used the wrong side of the fabric!

Knit Fabric-Double Border Ombre Slub Knit Mint Yep!  If you look at this photo on the JoAnn Fabric’s website, you’ll notice it’s greener than my skirt.  Plus it has the trendy “slub knit” texture thing going on, which I also didn’t want on a scale as large as the Syrah Skirt.  So, to quote, “It’s my party and I’ll cry use the wrong side of the fabric if I want to!”

Ombre Syrah Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

Of course a skirt this fantastic needed a basic to support and accentuate all it’s greatness, so I paired it with my Union St. Tee.  (Oh, and a fun side note; today we’re celebrating Hey June June over on Instagram, so check that out!)  And those shoes?  They were given to my daughters by their cousin, and passed on to me completely unworn.  All the teenagers wanted them back once they saw me pairing them with my new Syrah Skirt, but I said no.  It was my birthday and all.

Ombre Syrah Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

Alright, leave me a comment about something.  Do you have a birthday tradition?  Have you ever used the wrong side of the fabric?  Stolen your daughter’s shoes?

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Union St. Tee Review

Union St. Tee sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

Union St. Tee sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

Perhaps you will think this blog post a little boring, but I’m pretty excited about this basic pattern.    This is the Hey June Handmade Union St Tee pattern.  Because I have a habit of making two Hey June Patterns at the same time (indecisive about which view to make!) I sewed up 2 Union St Tees, a v-neck and a scoop neck.

Union St. Tee sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

The Union St. Tee can be made in 9 sizes from XXS to 3X.  Besides the 2 different necklines, this tee can be made with 4 different sleeve lengths.  The illustrations are line drawings.  If you’ve never sewn with knits before, this pattern would be a great place to start.

Union St. Tee sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

The first Union St. Tee I made is the most boring, but the most exciting to me!  Before I sewed this shirt, I didn’t have a plain white tee.  I know!  Such a basic and such a huge hole in my wardrobe.  Problem fixed.  I sewed the scoop neck with elbow length sleeves.  The fabric is Riley Blake Designs basic white knit.  I still think the neckline could use a tad bit of work, but you better believe this one is going to be worn steady!  I forgot to make my standard wide shoulder adjustment, but it’s not too bad of a fit.  I will remember to do that next time, for sure.

Union St. Tee sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

The second Union St. Tee I made is the v-neck with short sleeves.  I had never sewed a v-neck before, and I got this one right on the first try.  I don’t think it was talent or luck, but another point for Adrianna, the designer of Hey June Handmade patterns.  She really is amazing!

Union St. Tee sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

For this v-neck I used club knit fabric from Raspberry Creek Fabrics.  It’s so soft and beautiful, and amazing.  I also forgot the wide shoulder adjustment on this one, and I think that is the cause of the pulling you can see above the chest.  Not like that’s going to keep me from wearing it, or anything!

Union St. Tee sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

The only change I made to this one was to raise the v-neck by 1 inch (and shorten the neckband accordingly) due to the fact that I bend up and down 100 million times a day (side effect of having 7 children) and I usually don’t have a free hand to keep my shirt from flopping open.

Union St. Tee sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

Sometimes it’s the simplest thing in life that satisfy us the most, and sewing up the Union St. Tee definitely fits that category.  Now leave me a comment…what satisfying thing have you done lately?

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Lane Raglans Round 3

Lane Raglan Sew/Wear Off round 3 by Skirt Fixation

Lane Raglan Sew/Wear Off round 3 by Skirt Fixation

Alrighty then!  I promised you another Lane Raglan sew/wear off, so today’s the day!  When I made my black new Lane Raglan from the new pattern I absolutely love, love, loved the new fit.  And apparently so did Allegra.  She tried it on and refused to take it off and return it to me until I agreed to sew one for her.

Lane Raglan Sew/Wear Off round 3 by Skirt Fixation

So now we have 2 black Lane Raglans exactly the same except for the little ribbon I sewed inside the neckband of mine to differentiate between them.  But a boost post of a sew/wear off of two black new Lane Raglans would be quite boring, right?

Lane Raglan Sew/Wear Off round 3 by Skirt Fixation

So I made myself another one to add some variety.  I wish I would have taken a photo before I threw my old Lane Raglan pattern away, but I compared the new and old pattern pieces and they are completely different.  This new Lane Raglan pattern was completely revamped.

Lane Raglan Sew/Wear Off round 3 by Skirt Fixation

I really admire the persistence of Adrianna, the genius behind Hey June Handmade Patterns.  I mean, as Skirt Fixation readers know, this pattern was very good and very much loved by one and all!  But Adrianna wasn’t satisfied because of a few little issues so she stuck with it until she created the perfect pattern.

Lane Raglan Sew/Wear Off round 3 by Skirt Fixation

We will be really surprised if there are any more updates to this pattern because it’s perfect now.  But we were pretty sure it was perfect before too!  We will keep sewing Lane Raglans because they are so awesome.  Now to decide which version to sew next!

Lane Raglan Sew/Wear Off round 3 by Skirt Fixation

These two are the elbow sleeve, curved hem version.  If you’re not already a proud new Lane Raglan owner, you can get the pattern here.  No affiliate link, just major fan girls!  Also, we’re in love with the new Camden Raglan pattern by Hey June Handmade for juniors.

Lane Raglan Sew/Wear Off round 3 by Skirt Fixation

Fabric for my and David’s shirts from Hancock Fabrics.   The coral is leftover Art Gallery Knit fabric from making Annie’s leggings.  Fabric for Allegra’s (and my other Lane) came from JoAnn Fabrics.  I can’t link to it because I’m not sure which black knit fabric on their website it is.  I just walked the knit aisle at JoAnn’s feeling every black knit until I found the one with the softest hand that was 100% cotton.  It also happened to be the most expensive…  Feeling it is the best way I’ve found to get the right kind of knit fabric.  If you have to buy knit fabric online for your first time sewing with knit fabrics, use a knit from Art Gallery Fabrics.  They have so many solid and patterned options, and their knit will guarantee your first time sewing with knits turns out well.  Plus, I’ve found Art Gallery knit fabric to be very durable with no pilling.  You can find it many places, but the widest selection can probably be found at Hawthorne Threads.  Do you have any tips for buying knit fabric online?