Posted on 2 Comments

1 Pattern, 3 Shirts – A Comparison

Union St. Tee sewn by Skirt Fixation

Recently, I used the Union St. Tee pattern from Hey June Patterns to sew 3 quite different shirts for my daughters and I.  It’s one thing we love about this pattern, the versatility.  And if you would like to read an in-depth comparison of the 3 fabrics I used, head over to CaliFabrics.

Union St. Tee

The first Union St. Tee I sewed was for Allegra.  She requested the scoop neckline and elbow length sleeves.  I’ve actually never made the scoop neckline before, and think it looks so nice on her!  The elbow length sleeves will help stretch this tee into fall wearing.  Allegra requested a semi-slouchy tee, so I made a size large and graded out to a size XL at the hips.  Also, I used the full bust adjustment front piece and it fits so nicely on her.  Finally, I added 1 extra inch of width at the shoulders, because although she is not as tall as Aria or I, she got that wide shoulder gene.   Her Union St. Tee is made from modal fabric.

Union St. Tee sewn by Skirt Fixation

The next Union St. Tee I sewed for Aria.  She requested the crew neckline and elbow length sleeves.  After she felt the camo linen jersey, she also requested a slouchy tee, so I made her a size L, and added 1” at the shoulders and 2” to the length.  Since this fabric doesn’t have much recovery, I used plain white jersey for the neckband.  I haven’t officially admitted it yet, but I think she’s taller than me.

Union St. Tee sewn by Skirt Fixation

And of course, I had to get in on the Union St. Tee fun!  I sewed the v-neck and raised it 1”, my standard adjustment for this pattern.  I added 1.5” to the length and also used the 1” broad shoulder adjustment.  To make this tee just right for fall wearing, I also chose the elbow length sleeve.  For fun, I added a striped pocket to this tee.  My Union St. Tee is made from double brushed poly fabric.  

Union St. Tee sewn by Skirt Fixation

In a side by side comparison (there are more of these over at CaliFabrics) you can see more of the differences in the 3 shirts.  One pattern, 3 different shirts, 3 happy wearers!

Affiliate links are used in this post, because we love buying fabric and patterns!  If you click on one of our affiliate links, we might make a few extra pennies at no extra cost to you.  Thank you for supporting our small business.  Be assured we only recommend and link to products we use and love!

Posted on 2 Comments

Girl’s Ombre Maxi Skirt

Girl's ombre maxi skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

It’s been a while since I sewed Annie a maxi skirt.  As fast as she’s growing, the last maxi skirt I made her wasn’t maxi for very long either!  So it was time to keep the maxi skirt love alive and growing.  She fell in love with my ombre maxi skirt last year, and we recently found the perfect fabric.

Girl's ombre maxi skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

For the pattern we used the girl’s version of the Jocole A-line maxi skirt.  This time we sewed a size 6 in width, and size 10 in length.  (She’s so lucky to have a mom who sews for her!)

The beautiful fabric is blue ombre double brushed poly from Simply By Ti.  This is Annie’s 1st garment made from double brushed poly.  Just like everyone else with their 1st double brushed poly garment, she is in total adoration over the softness and comfort.  This fabric is also available in a pink ombre color.  Which Annie would have adored as well!

Girl's ombre maxi skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

Interestingly enough, recently Annie went shopping in our attic where her older sisters store the clothes they’ve outgrown until they fit Annie.  It was very fun for all of us to see how some of the first skirts we sewed and refashioned for Aria now are fitting Annie!

Girl's ombre maxi skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

It was intriguing to see how much our sewing skills have improved since then too.  Refashioning is a good way to put old clothes to use again, to stir the creative mind, and to get back into the sewing groove.

Girl's ombre maxi skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

We sometimes still refashion around here, but more often we have been choosing to sew a garment from start to finish.

Girl's ombre maxi skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation We’re excited to see where our sewing journey takes us next!  And we absolutely love working with small fabric shops like Simply by Ti.  Please go check out their excellent selection of garment fabrics.  Simply by Ti is a small fabric shop run by a mom who had a difficult time finding good garment fabrics online, so she started her own shop with really great garment fabrics.  She’s super friendly and willing to help her customers with fabric selection.

Girl's ombre maxi skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

The fabric for this post was provided by Simply By Ti.  Honest review is by us!  Annie styled this ombre maxi skirt with her Geneva Cardigan, blogged here.

Posted on 2 Comments

Corduroy Sandbridge Skirt and Baby Dress

Corduroy skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation. Check out the corduroy baby dress and bonnet too!

Today we’ve got a fun post for you about some of our fabric fabrics and patterns.  Corduroy was one of the first fabrics I fell in love with when I first started sewing, and all these years later, I’m still in love and sewing with it often!  We’re going to share pattern details here, so please check out our post over at CaliFabrics to discover more about the fabrics we used to make these clothes!

Corduroy skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation.  Check out the corduroy baby dress and bonnet too!

The first thing I sewed from this corduroy fabric was a skirt, of course!  From the first time I made the Sandbridge Skirt, I changed just 2 things to make this great skirt pattern work better for me.  The first thing I did was to add 2 more inches to the hem, bringing it to a total of 24” in length.  It hits just at the knee, and is perfect for fall layered with leggings and boots.

Corduroy skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation. Check out the corduroy baby dress and bonnet too!

The other modification I made to the Sandbridge Skirt pattern was to made a slightly more aline shape by adding 1.5” to the width of the each skirt pattern piece at the hem, starting below the bottom of the pocket bag and angling out to the hem.  It was very simple to do, and this shape allows me to break into a dead run whenever I need to catch a child from falling out of a tree or rescue the cat’s tail from the toy dump truck races.  Or any other imaginable events occurring on a daily basis among my tribe of 8 kids.

https://blog.califabrics.com/2017/12/03/baby-wale-corduroy-3-ways/

And if you don’t mind taking a look at my *ahem* backside, you really must check out the fantastic embroidery Allegra sewed on the back pocket for me.  She used floss colors in shades from the shirt fabric.  After she was done, I ironed on a piece of interfacing to protect the inside of the embroidery.

Corduroy skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation. Check out the corduroy baby dress and bonnet too!

The t-shirt is the new updated Union St. Tee made in double brushed poly.  This is the 2nd time I’ve made the updated version, and there will be many more.  In fact, I’ve got a whole pile of fabric waiting to be sewn into Union St. Tees, so be prepared!  You can read our thoughts on the update here.

Corduroy skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation. Check out the corduroy baby dress and bonnet too!

And now, the part you’ve been waiting for, Baby’s dress!  This photo above looks like she is excited for your attention too!  As I had enough corduroy fabric left over to make her a dress, I absolutely couldn’t refuse.  I used the Family Reunion Dress pattern by Oliver + S.  We’ve sewn up this pattern in the larger size to make a top for Annie here.  We love the classic lines and delicate features of this pattern.  The pin tuck pleats and button up back are two feature that we’re smitten over!  I used these wood buttons.

Corduroy skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation.  Check out the corduroy baby dress and bonnet too!

I sewed a size 12 months for Baby, hoping for a little added length.  When I held up the dress to her before hemming, I could see she was going to grow out of it in no time flat, so instead of putting the hem facing inside the dress, I added it to the length at the bottom.  Hopefully this will make the dress last a couple more months!

Corduroy skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation.  Check out the corduroy baby dress and bonnet too!

And with the very, very, very last bits of scraps we sewed a reversible bonnet for Baby!  The fabric on the reverse is left over from another one of Annie’s shirts.  I don’t have photographic evidence, but I also used it as the trim inside my skirt too.

Corduroy skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation.  Check out the corduroy baby dress and bonnet too!

But this bonnet is utterly adorable, and Baby looks equally cute in either side!  (Psst, if you want a bonnet, but don’t want to make one, check out our bonnet shop, Savvy Noggins!)

Corduroy skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation.  Check out the corduroy baby dress and bonnet too!

If you love Baby’s moccasin boots, you can grab similar ones here.  And my boots can be found here.

That ‘s it for us today.  We appreciate you reading and following along with our sewing adventures.  If you have time, we’d love to hear your thoughts in the comments below.

Affiliate links are used in this post to some really great products!  That means if you click on one of our affiliate links, you could end up with some really amazing products and we might make a few pennies at no extra cost to you.  We promise we only share links to products we use and think are awesome, or ones we really love!

Posted on 3 Comments

Tips for sewing double brushed poly fabric

Tips for sewing double brushed poly fabric on a regular sewing machine

Recently I’ve had fun working with a new kind of fabric.  Double brushed poly fabric is a knit polyester fabric that has been brushed on both sides, making it super soft to wear, but a little tricky to work with.

Tips for sewing double brushed poly fabric on a regular sewing machine

Before I started sewing with double brushed poly fabric, I researched it a little bit.  I concluded that if you have a serger you will have almost no trouble sewing with double brushed poly fabric.  Since I didn’t sew either of the shirts in this post with a serger (because I don’t HAVE one!) I’ll give you some tips I’ve picked up along the way about sewing double brushed poly fabric with a regular sewing machine.

Tips for sewing double brushed poly fabric on a regular sewing machine

Double brushed poly fabric has a 4 way stretch that is greater than 100% and it has good recovery, which means it’s very forgiving to sew with.  It also has beautiful drape so there are many garments that look quite lovely sewn up with double brushed poly.

Tips for sewing double brushed poly fabric on a regular sewing machine

Quite a few seamstresses used double brushed poly fabric to make leggings, which is what I used it for my 1st time working with it.  This fabric is 96% polyester, which the name indicates, and can be a little too hot to wear as a fitted garment in the summer.  The other 4% is spandex.  Some have found that looser, breezier garments from double brushed poly fabric work great in the heat.  Personally, I’ve worn these 2 tops all summer with no trouble.

Tips for sewing double brushed poly fabric on a regular sewing machine

My biggest tip for sewing with double brushed poly fabric on a regular sewing machine is to use the right needle.  A new stretch or ballpoint needle will help your machine NOT skip stitches.

My 2nd tip is to use the right thread.  I had much better luck with 100% polyester thread than cotton or even a cotton/polyester blend.

My 3rd tip is to use the right stitch.  My machine has a stretch stitch which worked great for straight seams.  (You can also use a narrow zigzag stitch.)

The next tip is that if your machine starts skipping stitches (which seems to be the biggest problem when sewing with double brushed poly fabric) stop!  Rethread both the bobbin and the main thread, and try again.

Tips for sewing double brushed poly fabric on a regular sewing machine

And finally, a tip few tips for hemming double brushed poly fabric:

use a double needle (or zigzag stitch,)

a longer stitch length (I used about 3.5)

some Lite EZ-Steam II fusible tape inside the hems

I also buried the ends of the thread inside my seams so they didn’t come unraveled.  This means I had to hem the sleeves and bottom before I sewed the side seams.  But it works great, and in almost 3 months of wearing, no popped hems!

Tips for sewing double brushed poly fabric on a regular sewing machine

Pink shirt details:

Pattern source: Hey June Handmade Union St Tee

Fabric source:  Raspberry Creek Fabrics (no longer available, but a nice selection of double brushed poly fabric)

Blue shirt details:

Pattern source: Hey June Handmade Lane Raglan

Fabric source:  CaliFabrics (no longer available, but a nice selection of double brushed poly fabric)

Tips for sewing double brushed poly fabric on a regular sewing machine

Affiliate links are used in the post to some really good products!  Be warned that if you click through our links you might also be the proud owner of really awesome patterns and fabric!  And also, we might make a few pennies to be able to support this blogging habit we have!