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Lion Hoodie from Narnia

Lion hoodie sewn by Skirt Fixation.

You may have noticed the other day when I posted the French Terry fabric comparison that a certain little boy got left out in the animal hoodie theme.  When I saw Raspberry Creek Fabrics spring release CLUB fabrics, I saw the perfect opportunity to rectify a situation which included a very upset little boy.  Enter the lion hoodie.

Lion hoodie sewn by Skirt Fixation.

This fabric is the mustard yellow and white gingham check from the Sasquatch line designed by Kimberly Henrie for CLUB.  It has the amazing softness of all other French Terry knit fabric we’ve gotten from Raspberry Creek Fabrics.

Lion hoodie sewn by Skirt Fixation.

When I offered Lowell his choice of animals to put on the front, he immediately chose a lion.  Allegra has been reading him and his siblings the Chronicles on Narnia series at night before bed, and he has fallen in love with Aslan.  So a lion it was.  Allegra thinks it’s cool that she’s introduced a 3 year old to the world of Narnia and he loves it!

Lion hoodie sewn by Skirt Fixation.

To make the lion, I printed out a silhouette of a lion that Lowell picked from Google images.  I cut out this lion by hand, layering up the paper and the fabric.  Then I sewed the fabric cutout onto the front of the hoodie by stitching with a straight stitch as close to the edge as I could.  The french terry was very stable to work with.  I expect it to fray slightly along the edges, making the lion look furry.  On the other 2 hoodies, the accent fabric was jersey, so they won’t fray or fuzz along the edges.  The gingham french terry fabric is the lining inside the hood too.

Lion hoodie sewn by Skirt Fixation.

Because I was curious, I researched the difference between gingham and buffalo plaid.  Apparently, gingham always has white as one of the two colors, and is usually smaller in scale than plaid, but not always.  And often, buffalo plaid has black as one of it’s colors, but again, not always.  Now you know!

Lion hoodie sewn by Skirt Fixation.

During the photoshoot, it was hard to get pictures of Lowell not showing me his best lion growls and clawing hands.  I had to think up different things for him to do!  Look up at me, play peekaboo, look out the window, etc.

Lion hoodie sewn by Skirt Fixation.

The other fabric is solid black french terry from Raspberry Creek Fabrics, and it’s very dreamy.  I’m not planning to do another comparison, but this one is very, very good!  Probably a very good mix of the best things about both of the other fabrics I compared.  Definitely one I would get again!

Lion hoodie sewn by Skirt Fixation.

Just like David’s hoodie, I used the Bimaa pattern, and this on is the exact same size I made David!  The boys really are close in size when it comes to bulky sweatshirts, like this one.  But I’m pretty sure they’re not going to share!

Lion hoodie sewn by Skirt Fixation.

Once again, all Raspberry Creek Fabrics spring CLUB fabrics are on sale for $1 off during release week which ends tomorrow.  You really should get some!  Head here to check them all out.

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French Terry Comparison

French Terry Comparison by Skirt Fixation

Today I’m going to walk you through a french terry comparison of 2 different fabrics. For purposes of this comparison, I sewed 2 similar items (a hoodie for a boy) so they are comparable for you to observe. Some of the differences are slight, and some are quite noticeable.

French Terry Comparison by Skirt Fixation

The 2 french terry fabrics are a traditional french terry, and a baby french terry. I got both of them from Simply By Ti fabrics, and both in black so once again, color is similar for this comparison. As you will see, I did mix it up with some buffalo plaid appliqué creatures at the boys’ request. The buffalo plaid is also inside the kangaroo pocket and lines the hoodie.

I used triblend Black Baby French Terry fabric for the wolf hoodie, and regular french terry for the bear hoodie.

French Terry comparison – stats

French Terry Comparison by Skirt Fixation

Here’s a chart showing the basic numerical comparisons of the two french terry fabrics. All of this information is basically self explanatory, except perhaps the weight. The ounces per yard is listed, and shows how much one yard of fabric weighs. It makes the regular french terry thicker or more dense, much like sweatshirt fabric in consistency.

French Terry comparison – hand

French Terry Comparison by Skirt Fixation

In my opinion, the rayon content in the baby french terry is what makes it so different. The baby french terry is very, very soft, and has excellent drape. While it works for a hoodie like I sewed, it would also work very nicely for a skirt or swing dress. You can see the excellent drape of the older boy’s hoodie especially in the photo of the back of the hoodies.

French Terry comparison – laundry

French Terry Comparison by Skirt Fixation

I have been laundering both of these fabrics the same, cold wash and dried in the dryer. I forgot to measure for and percentage of shrinkage before and after laundering them the 1st time, but since then, neither of them have shrunk.

French Terry comparison – durability

French Terry Comparison by Skirt Fixation

Neither of these hoodies has begun to pill, as both of the fabrics are really good quality. However, my guess would be that the baby french terry would pill first. Also, it could potentially snag on something (like when boys climb trees!) as the weave seems to be a little bit looser than the regular french terry.

French Terry comparison – warmth

French Terry Comparison by Skirt Fixation

Both of these are very warm. My guess would be that the baby french terry would keep the wearer a little warmer in colder temperatures due to the polyester content. But the tighter weave of the regular french terry makes it very warm too!

French Terry comparison – lint/static

French Terry Comparison by Skirt Fixation

My boys haven’t complained about either of these categories, but I’m not sure how much they’d notice anyway! Just having the fabrics in my sewing room, the regular french terry seemed to collect a little more dust/lint than the baby french terry. If they were put to the test, my guess would be that the baby french terry might have more of an issue with static or cling, but that’s just a guess.

French Terry comparison – stretch and recovery

French Terry Comparison by Skirt Fixation

Both of these fabrics have similar stretch and recovery properties. This means that they will stretch to fit the body without getting stretched out. They both stretch vertically and horizontally, making them really nice for so many garments.

French Terry comparison – pattern suggestions

French Terry Comparison by Skirt Fixation

Regular French Terry would be awesome for

Halifax Hoodie view C (with the zipper)

Jasper Sweater and Dress

Knight Hoodie

Hudson Pants

Aster Cardigan

Grandpa Cardigan

Geneva Cardigan

Aspen Pullover

Hatteras Hoodie,

Parachute Pants

Ila Dress

Bimaa Hoodie (pattern used for the bear hoodie)

Wild Things Coat or Vest

Baby French Terry would be amazing for

Charleston Dress,

Halifax Hoodie (any other view)

Paro Cardigan

Finlayson Sweater (pattern used for the wolf hoodie)

Hampton Hoodie

Lane Raglan,

Runway Skirt

Seattle Skater Skirt

Renfrew Top

Tallinn Sweater,

Camden Raglan,

Eeny Meeny Miny Moe

Rosemary Raglan

Skip Along Skort

That’s it for today!  Leave a comment about french terry…what have you used it for?

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Ruffle Skirt {All The Skirts: Jocole & Urban Sew}

Jocole Ruffle Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation using Nano Iro woodblock fabric from Urban Sew

Jocole Ruffle Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation using Nano Iro woodblock fabric from Urban Sew

Today we have a free pattern, a refashion and the next skirt for All The Skirts: Jocole and Urban Sew all wrapped up in one sweet little package!  We usually say this about everything we make, but we think this is probably the cutest outfit we’ve made yet!  Let’s take them in order from top to bottom.

Jocole Ruffle Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation using Nano Iro woodblock fabric from Urban Sew

As we mentioned yesterday, February’s challenge from Project Run & Play was the Mademoiselle Muscle Tee from Susan of Living With Punks.  We used that pattern to create Annie’s shirt.  The pattern comes in a size 5, and that fit Annie perfectly.

Jocole Ruffle Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation using Nano Iro woodblock fabric from Urban Sew

To the main pattern, we added sleeves and a cowl neck, both from the Bimaa pattern.  Annie wears the Bimaa we made her for January’s bubble hem challenge almost constantly, so we were pretty sure she’d be delighted to get a similar shirt.  We also extended the cuffs from the original Bimaa as Annie’s arms seem to be longer than every pattern!

Jocole Ruffle Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation using Nano Iro woodblock fabric from Urban Sew

I used the rest of the ivory knit fabric from JoAnn’s purchased to make myself this top, and almost didn’t have enough!  I had to piece one of the sleeves, but Annie either hasn’t noticed or it doesn’t bother her.

Jocole Ruffle Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation using Nano Iro woodblock fabric from Urban Sew

The sweater vest is the refashion.  I found a hooded sweater in the women’s section at Goodwill, but couldn’t even fit my arms into the sleeves.  When Annie tried it on, the sleeves fit around, but were too long (as was the sweater in general) and one of the cuffs was shredded.  So suffice it to say, this piece took quite a bit of work to make the sweet little vest you see here!  I used the Mademoiselle Muscle Tee pattern to make this vest too!

Jocole Ruffle Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation using Nano Iro woodblock fabric from Urban Sew

The skirt is Jocole’s Ruffle Skirt.  But this is no plain old ruffle skirt!  There is a yoke, an option for shorts or bloomers, and it comes sized from doll, then preemie to 5 years.

Jocole Ruffle Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation using Nano Iro woodblock fabric from Urban Sew

I really enjoyed making this skirt!  It was easy and offered both pattern pieces or measurements for cutting out the skirt.

Jocole Ruffle Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation using Nano Iro from Urban Sew

True to form for a Jocole pattern, there were lots of different options included in this pattern.  For example, there are 3 different gathering methods explained.  I chose to do the one I’d never tried before, and from now on I’ll be gathering fabric that way!  It was lightening fast and easy!

Jocole Ruffle Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation using Nano Iro from Urban Sew

We also used the instructions for adding shorts underneath the skirt; both Annie and I love this!

Jocole Ruffle Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation using Nano Iro from Urban Sew

Annie also had to check the skirt for twirl ability…it passed!

Jocole Ruffle Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation using Nano Iro from Urban Sew

I love how the dots change from large to small around the width (rather than length) of the skirt.

Jocole Ruffle Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation using Nano Iro from Urban Sew

The fabric used to make the Jocole Ruffle Skirt is Nani Iro Woodblock Print sent to us by Urban Sew.  This is by far the most special fabric I’ve ever worked with.  Seriously!  I’m already plotting what to make for myself with some Nani Iro fabric.  It is beyond soft, and does not wrinkle like I thought it would.

Jocole Ruffle Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation using Nano Iro from Urban Sew

This skirt may be a little fuller than the original pattern, but when I saw and felt the pure luxury that is this Nani Iro fabric, I just could NOT cut any of it out.  So I simply cut it into two rectangles and used the full piece.

Jocole Ruffle Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation using Nano Iro from Urban Sew

I happened to have the perfect matching fabric in my stash for the yoke piece, since I’d used all the Nani Iro fabric for the ruffle part of the skirt!

Jocole Ruffle Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation using Nano Iro from Urban Sew

You can enter our giveaway to win 3 patterns of your choice from Jocole and a $40 gift certificate to Urban Sew.   Remember, every item you link up to the Jocole and Urban Sew link up is now worth 5 entries!

Jocole Ruffle Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation using Nano Iro from Urban Sew

If we make it to the top 10 in Project Run & Play on either of our entries, we will have a tutorial for the sweater refashion, some outtakes from both photo shoots, and a Sew My Stash 2015 Reality check for both Project Run & Play February entries, and last but not least, we’ll reveal what Mr Skirt Fixation contributed to this photo shoot!

Jocole Ruffle Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation using Nano Iro from Urban Sew

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A Betty Skirt for Fall

The Betty Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

We are delighted to be the next stop on The Betty Skirt tour.  The Shaffer Sisters created this sweet little skirt pattern, and have are hosting the blog tour to show it off.

The Betty Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

There have been some fantastic versions of The Betty Skirt, and if you haven’t already, go visit the other Betty Skirts.  If you’ve been around Skirt Fixation very long, you know we L.O.V.E. the Betty Skirt.  We made two for Annie already, the seashell skirt, and the honeybee skirt.  But she’s had a mega growth spurt and outgrown them both!

The Betty Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

So it was time for a new Betty Skirt, and we wanted to make one that was going to last her through the fall and winter.  We decided to refashion a sweater to make her new Betty Skirt.

A sweater skirt refashion

We found this 2XL argyle cardigan at Goodwill, and our new Betty Skirt began to take shape.  The other two Betty Skirts we made were the gathered version, and this time we wanted to make the version with the placket, so the cardigan fit the ticket perfectly.  Although this sweater was very big to start with, it wasn’t quite big enough to make the full width of the panels, so this Betty Skirt is not as full as intended, but we’re pretty happy with the way it turned out anyway.

The Betty Skirt

The Betty Skirt is so fast and easy to sew up that we decided to make Annie a matching top, and we turned to our new favorite top pattern, The Bimaa Sweater.  At Goodwill, we grabbed another large and matching sweater for The Bimaa.

sweater refashion

Talk about another fast sew, this one was even faster because we used the existing hem and some of the existing sleeves.  (We made the sleeves extra long so she can cuff them and so she can wear the Bimaa Sweater more than just a few weeks!)  Growth spurts be gone!

sweater skirt refashion

We used the sleeves from the first sweater to make the shawl collar.

The Betty Skirt

So now Annie has a new outfit, a Betty (Sweater) Skirt and matching Bimaa Sweater.  The only thing left to do is figure out how to make one in my size!

The Betty skirt by Shaffer Sisters

The Shaffer Sisters have graciously allowed us to giveaway one copy of The Betty Skirt, so use the Rafflecopter below to enter to win.  This giveaway ends Saturday night, so if you’re not the winner, you still have one more day to use the coupon code “BETTYTOUR” for 30% off The Betty Skirt.  Believe me, this is one pattern you will make over and over and over again!

The Betty Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

 

betty-skirt-tour-button

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Sweater Skirt refashion by Skirt Fixation

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How to Add a Woven Lining to the Hood of the Bimaa Sweater

How to add a woven lining to the hood of the Bimaa Sweater.

How to add a woven lining to the hood of the Bimaa Sweater.

We snagged a Bimaa Sweater pattern during the Friday Fiver over at Crafterhours, and immediately got to sewing!  Aria had a birthday recently, and so I made her a whole outfit.  That skirt will be coming soon, but for today, I want to show you the Bimaa Sweater, and explain how I added a woven lining to the hood of the Bimaa Sweater.  You see, LouBeeDoo Clothing, who makes the Bimaa, recommends avoiding the temptation of making the hood from woven material because it won’t stretch and fit over their head.  So if you want to add a woven lining to the hood of the Bimaa Sweater, you have to do it like this tutorial.

How to Add a Woven Lining to the Hood of the Bimaa Sweater

How to add a woven lining to the hood of the Bimaa Sweater.

 

Step 1: Mark a line across your hood pattern piece, about 1/4 inch above the jutting out part, as shown.

How to add a woven lining to the hood of the Bimaa Sweater.

Step 2: Cut out the section below the line from knit fabric, adding 1/4 inch to the top.  Cut out the section above the line from woven fabric, adding a 1/4 inch to the bottom for seam allowance.

How to add a woven lining to the hood of the Bimaa Sweater.

Step 3:  Sew the two pieces together.

How to add a woven lining to the hood of the Bimaa Sweater.

Proceed with the pattern directions.  You can cut the middle piece from woven fabric without following the steps above because there will be enough stretch from the knit on the hood pieces.

How to add a woven lining to the hood of the Bimaa Sweater.

I really admire all the versions of the Bimaa Sweater that I’ve seen, and can’t wait to make the cowl neck version and the shawl collar version too.  I just wish the Bimaa Sweater came in adult sizes!

How to add a woven lining to the hood of the Bimaa Sweater.

The only other change I made to the Bimaa Sweater pattern was to lengthen the cuffs.  I’m sure Aria gets her long arms from me!  When she tried on the Bimaa Sweater she loved it except the sleeves were too short, so the easiest thing was to lengthen the cuffs.  And she thinks long cuffs look better on her than short cuffs.  I tend to agree with her for larger sizes.

How to add a woven lining to the hood of the Bimaa Sweater.

So now you know how to add a woven lining to the hood of the Bimaa Sweater!  Have fun!

How to add a woven lining to the hood of the Bimaa Sweater.

 

The Bimaa Sweater is very fast and easy to sew…as long as you don’t have to go back and add sleeve length!  But even then, I made the Bimaa Sweater in just one afternoon.

How to add a woven lining to the hood of the Bimaa Sweater.The soft chocolaty brown knit is from JoAnn’s.  The Cotton + Steel hood lining is from Pink Chalk Fabrics.  The skirt…coming soon!

How to add a woven lining to the hood of the Bimaa Sweater.

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