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Mini Senna Tote

Mini Senna Tote sewed by Skirt Fixation

Mini Senna Tote sewed by Skirt Fixation

The second to last piece in the Modern Chloris mini wardrobe collection is the mini Senna Tote. I wasn’t sure if I was going to have time to complete it with all the other pieces I had planned. But Annie insisted. And part of the idea behind the mini wardrobe collection was child input, so…

Mini Senna Tote sewed by Skirt Fixation

The rose pink pleather really reflects Annie’ choice. She would have all pink all the time!  The rose pleather, or vegan leather if you prefer, came from Girl Charlee.  They have just about every color you could need!

Mini Senna Tote sewed by Skirt Fixation

The main fabric used to make the mini Senna Tote is called Kladi Underlight. Recognize it?  That’s because we chose the other color way for the maxi skirt from the Aquatic Countryside look.  It’s from Katarina Rocella’s Skopelos line of fabric, as are all the fabric in this mini wardrobe collection and was generously given to us by Art Gallery Fabrics.

Mini Senna Tote sewed by Skirt Fixation

The contrast pocket and inside fabric is from our fabric stash, it might be shot cotton, and we used it to line the dress from this mini collection also.

Mini Senna Tote sewed by Skirt Fixation

Annie carried her mini Senna Tote for the Flower Market look, but it does go with everything in the mini wardrobe collection.  Really it might be both of our favorite piece from the whole Modern Chloris collection!  It’s so delicate and miniature looking.

Mini Senna Tote sewed by Skirt Fixation

Okay, here are the top secret details on how you can make a mini Senna Tote for yourself, I mean your little one!  You need Senna Tote pattern.  Print out the pattern pieces at 50% instead of 100%.  Be sure to add back seam allowances because they will have been shrunk by 50% too.  Sewing a 1/8 inch seam allowance could get pretty tricky on parts of the mini Senna Tote.  Ask me how I know!

Mini Senna Tote sewed by Skirt Fixation

The cool part of making a mini Senna Tote is that it takes less materials and less time too!  I think I will make one at 75% next!   In that case, you would add 1/8 back to the seam allowances I think.  The easiest way to figure out the length of zipper you will need is to measure your shrunken pattern piece.  In our case, we were using a zipper we harvested off of a thrifted purse.  We couldn’t find the right shade of zipper, but the purse was as cheap as a zipper plus the shipping it would have cost us to get exactly the right shade of pink!

Mini Senna Tote sewed by Skirt Fixation

To figure the length of the straps, the easiest thing is to just measure with a measuring tape on the intended recipient.   The 50% measure doesn’t work too well here either.  We made the straps at 50% width, but you would widen these if you wanted.  These work perfectly for Annie’s little hands.

Mini Senna Tote sewed by Skirt Fixation

Annie absolutely adores her mini Senna Tote.  She stores all her most special treasures in it and has (so far) managed to keep it away from her little brothers!

Mini Senna Tote from Modern Chloris mini wardrobe collection sewed by Skirt Fixation

Here is the link to the Senna Tote I made myself, for comparison.  The other Mini Senna Tote versions I’ve seen are Groovy Baby and Mama’s for Stylo Magazine and Alexis of Whimsy Tailes on Instagram.

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DIY Nursing Friendly Ballard {Remix the Stitch}

DIY nursing friendly reversible Ballard top sewn by Skirt Fixation.

DIY nursing friendly reversible Ballard top sewn by Skirt Fixation.

I was thrilled when Kimberly of Straight Stitch Designs asked me to be part of her Remix the Stitch blog tour celebrating the one year anniversary of Straight Stitch Designs.  After perusing her patterns, I settled on the Ballard because I had an idea on how to remix it into a nursing friendly top.  I actually figured out two ways to make the Ballard nursing friendly and reversible and convertible to a non nursing top!  How’s that for versatility?

DIY nursing friendly reversible Ballard top sewn by Skirt Fixation.

 

To make a nursing friendly top out of the Ballard pattern, you have to begin by cutting it out differently.

Cut out two back pattern pieces, one for the open back pattern, and one for the closed back pattern.

You will need to change the neckline to make it reversible.  Raise the neckline on the front pattern piece by 1.25 inches and lower the neckline on the back pattern pieces by 1.25 inches.

When it’s time to sew the shoulders together, layer the two backs and one front piece like this:

DIY nursing friendly reversible Ballard top sewn by Skirt Fixation.

Closed back (right side up)

Open backs (right side up)

Front (right side down)

When you sew up the side seams, sew up the sleeves, then do NOT catch the closed back piece in the side seams when you sew the front and (open) back pieces together.  This is how you will get access for nursing your baby. Like this:

DIY nursing friendly reversible Ballard top sewn by Skirt Fixation.

When you sew the hem band, be sure to catch both layers of the back pattern pieces.

When you pin the neckband to the shirt, place the neckband seam on one of the shoulder seams so your shirt will be reversible.

When you sew the neckband, be sure to catch both layers of the back pattern pieces.

DIY nursing friendly reversible Ballard top sewn by Skirt Fixation.

To make the button up (or snap) version of the reversible, nursing friendly Ballard, most of your steps will be the same.

Cut out two back pattern pieces, one for the open back pattern, but cut a straight instead of curved line.  Use the farthest parts of the curve and draw a straight line from the top to the bottom.  Like this:

diagram

When you fold over the edges of your open back pieces, you will fold over enough width to create a button placket (or if you do snaps, use the 1/2” recommended)  Also, I would suggest ironing in some lightweight interfacing to help your buttonholes maintain their shape.

After you have assembled the shirt, make buttonholes and sew on buttons.  Or use snaps as I did.

DIY nursing friendly reversible Ballard top sewn by Skirt Fixation.

I did not cut my Ballard as I suggest you do above, so you can see some gapping across the front.  If I would have had enough fabric to cut the pattern piece underneath of the same fabric this would not be as noticeable.  So you can learn from my mistake and cut yours wider!  The next nursing friendly Ballard I make will definitely have a button placket up the front/back.

DIY nursing friendly reversible Ballard top sewn by Skirt Fixation.

Yes, I’m having some front/back confusion because I made these Ballard tops reversible!  That’s because the back is so fun and the front is so cute, I wanted to be able to wear them either way after my baby is finished nursing.

DIY nursing friendly reversible Ballard top sewn by Skirt Fixation.

This photo is my tribute to Kimberly because she’s always laughing and so beautiful on the pictures on her pattern covers!

If you’re confused about the convertible reversible aspect of this Ballard, here’s a little collage I made for you:DIY nursing friendly reversible Ballard top sewn by Skirt Fixation.

I actually had some shoes to go with this outfit, for once!  My sister would be proud!

DIY nursing friendly reversible Ballard top sewn by Skirt Fixation.

Be sure to visit all the other stops on the Remix the Stitch blog tour.  Oh, and there’s a giveaway too!

a Rafflecopter giveaway

DIY nursing friendly reversible Ballard top sewn by Skirt Fixation.

Tuesday, September 8th: Meg Cookin’ and Craftin’ | Jennifer Ginger Peach Studio
Wednesday, September 9th: Ajaire Call Ajaire | Heidi Handmade Frenzy | Stacey Boy, Oh Boy, Oh Boy Crafts
Thursday, September 10th: Melissa Rebel & Malice | Annika Näh-Connection | Abby Sew Much Ado
Friday, September 11th: Katie It’s Hard to Hear Up Here | Jane Buzzmills | Lisa Mabey She Made It
Saturday, September 12th: Elena Randomly Happy | Allie Indiesew | Jess If Only They Would Nap
Monday, September 14th: Jaime Made By Jaime | Lauren BASTE + GATHER | Sara Made by Sara
Tuesday, September 15th: Audrey Skirt Fixation | Teri Fa Sew La | Hayley Welcome to the Mouse House
Wednesday, September 16th: Emi Just Add Fabric | Rachael Imagine Gnats | Teresa Dandelion Drift
Thursday, September 17th: Kaysie | KZJO’STUDIO Rita Conversas de Hermanas | Stephanie Swoodson Says
Friday, September 18th: Andreia In a Manner of Sewing | Nienke Pienkel | Abbey Sew Charleston

DIY nursing friendly reversible Ballard top sewn by Skirt Fixation.

All links to Straight Stitch Designs are affiliate links because as you can see we LOVE this pattern, and have our eye on several more, so if you click through on our link, we may eventually make enough money to support our pattern habit!

 

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Ruffled Canvas Jacket

Modern Chloris sewn by Skirt Fixation

Modern Chloris sewn by Skirt Fixation

Instead of making you wait for all the details about everyone’s favorite piece from our Modern Chloris mini wardrobe collection, I decided to blog about the ruffled canvas jacket today for you.  You’re welcome!  Really, there will just be a pretty short tutorial, but the photos do most of the talking.  ruffled canvas jacket sewn by Skirt Fixation

I started with two things; the Modern Belle pattern by Lil Luxe Collection, and an inspiration photo from Pinterest.   Add to these 2 things the most wonderful, softest, most pliable canvas fabric EVER provided by Art Gallery Fabrics!

ruffled canvas jacket sewn by Skirt Fixation

I really really can’t say enough good things about Art Gallery Fabrics canvas.  I’ve never felt another canvas soft and pliable enough to make ruffles!  And that’s exactly what I did for the ruffled canvas jacket.

ruffled canvas jacket sewn by Skirt Fixation

Here’s the quick tutorial.  Cut out the arched side panels for the Modern Belle pattern.  Make a loooooong strip of ruffled fabric by cutting a strip of canvas 5 inches wide, folding it in half (wrong sides together) and ruffling it using your favorite method.

ruffled canvas jacket sewn by Skirt Fixation

Next, pin the ruffle to the bottom of the arched pattern piece with the ruffle’s bottom overhanging by about 1/2 inch.  Zig zag the top of the ruffle in place.  If you wish, you can add a 2nd line of straight stitching below the zig zig for security.  Cut off the edge of the ruffled strip even with the edge of the arched pattern piece.

Jacket Step2

Place the ruffled strip above the 1st ruffle, overlapping the bottom of the 2nd strip over the top of the 1st strip by about 1/2”  Repeat these steps until you get to the top of the arched pattern piece.  Making a size 6, I ended up with 7 layers of ruffles.  Continue sewing the Modern Belle pattern as instructed.  The side edges will be caught in the side seams.

JacketRuffles

At the top, I made a tiny rectangular placket and topstitched it over the top edge of the top ruffle so no raw edges would show.  Another change I made to the Modern Belle pattern were to cut the front piece not on the fold so I would be able to add a zipper.

ruffled canvas jacket sewn by Skirt Fixation

Also, I added a collar.  And the jacket is fully lined with navy sateen (leftover from Allegra’s Bistro dress.)  I used the instructions from the Downton Duffle Coat (*affiliate link) to assemble the lined jacket.

ruffled canvas jacket sewn by Skirt Fixation

Basically, this jacket is a piece of artwork which is fitting for the Modern Chloris theme which drew heavily on classical Greece.  I mean, what other era and location did so many timeless classic pieces of artwork emerge from?ruffled canvas jacket sewn by Skirt Fixation

As promised, I made a collage of flat lays to show you just how wonderfully this ruffled canvas jacket works with all the other pieces in our Modern Chloris mini collection.  Now all that’s left to do is figure out how to make one of these in my size!!!   And order some more of that luscious Art Gallery Fabrics canvas…as soon as I decide which one to choose!

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Half Apron Tutorial

Half Apron Tutorial by Skirt Fixation

Half apron tutorial by Skirt FixationHi! Allegra here! I have an easy half apron tutorial for you today! The back story is that we have always had this nice old checkered half apron that we wear when we are cooking or playing dress up, or pioneers or suchlike. I have always worn this apron, and lately I decided to make a semi-matching one for Aria. So, using some simple measurements, I created this easy half apron tutorial (WITH PICTURES, YAY) for you.

Half apron tutorial by Skirt Fixation What you will need:

A piece of fabric 36 inches wide by 29 inches long for the apron.

A piece of fabric 67 inches long by 2 inches wide. (If you want a wider waistband, then make the width be 4 inches)

ha13Note: The small square piece of fabric was for a pocket which I decided not to add.

Note: I used pretty quilting cotton from our stash.  I’m sure cotton works best here.

Half apron tutorial by Skirt FixationStep 1: Cut out your fabric.

Half apron tutorial by Skirt FixationStep 2: Around the bottom and two of the sides of the apron piece, iron over ¼ or ½ inch, depending on what size hem you want. Note: Usually, I iron down ¼ inch, and then fold it over the second time as I’m sewing. If you want to iron it over twice, though, by all means go for it!

Half apron tutorial by Skirt FixationStep 3: Sew down what you ironed.  Across the unfinished top, sew a basting or gather stitch, and gather until its 18 inches across.

Half apron tutorial by Skirt FixationStep 4: Take the 67 by 2 piece and iron over ¼ inch or smaller all the way around.

Half apron tutorial by Skirt FixationStep 5: Pin the apron front piece into the waistband piece so that the gathering is encapsulated in the waistband, and then sew it down.

Half apron tutorial by Skirt Fixation

Half apron tutorial by Skirt FixationStep 6: If you would like, sew trimming onto the bottom. I sewed some simple eyelet lace onto the back of the bottom hem.

Step 6: If you would like, sew trimming onto the bottom. I sewed some simple eyelet lace onto the back of the bottom hem.

Aria modeled her new apron, I think she likes it!

Step 6: If you would like, sew trimming onto the bottom. I sewed some simple eyelet lace onto the back of the bottom hem.Well, hope you like this half apron tutorial! Let us know what you make!

Allegra

Step 6: If you would like, sew trimming onto the bottom. I sewed some simple eyelet lace onto the back of the bottom hem.

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Circle Skirt Tutorial using Narrow Fabric

Skirt Fixation circle skirt tutorial

If you find a circle skirt tutorial on the internet, it will probably require you to use 60” wide fabric.  This makes sense because when you actually make a circle skirt, you cut a circle in the center for the waistband, and a wider circle using the whole width of the fabric for the length of the skirt.  And unless you are making a circle skirt for a girl, or you want a really short one, you have to use 60” wide fabric.  And then it ends about midi length.  So what do you do if you want a longer circle skirt or you want to use narrow fabric?  Well, there a couple of options.

First option: Cut two 1/2 circles on the edges of your fabric and sew them together at the sides.  This uses an extraordinary amount of fabric, wastes a lot, and sometimes the seams can hang longer or unevenly.  But it does accomplish the purpose.  So we found another way.

Circle Skirt Tutorial Using Narrow Fabric

Skirt Fixation circle skirt tutorial

2.  Make extensions on the sides of your fabric where the widest part of the circle will cross.  This eliminates the issue with the seams hanging uneven because the extension is not heavy.  And very little fabric is wasted.

Skirt Fixation circle skirt tutorial

This photo shows the cut lines.  You can see that without the extensions, the length of the skirt would have been much shorter!

Skirt Fixation circle skirt tutorial

And after it’s cut out.  Can you spot the extensions?  With fabric this busy, they are really hard to find!

Skirt Fixation circle skirt tutorial

Here you can see a close up of where the extension is, but it’s almost invisible on the finished skirt.  Of course if you match your patterns, this seam line will disappear entirely.  And when she spins, who would ever know?

Drop & Twirl Circle Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

There are so many delightful 44/45” fabrics available, and now you can make a circle skirt from them too, using our circle skirt tutorial and narrow fabric.  We chose to use this fabric from Urban Sew.  It’s called Oopsy Daisy, from Westminster fabrics, and is part of their La Dee Da line by Erin McMorris.  Right now, it’s only $6 per yard which is a screaming good deal!

Our favorite circle skirt pattern is the Drop & Twirl Circle Skirt from Jocole Patterns.  If you make it, or any Jocole pattern, be sure to link up to the Jocole and Urban Sew link party!  And enter our giveaway to win 3 patterns of your choice from Jocole and a $40 gift certificate to Urban Sew.

Combine these two things with our circle skirt tutorial for narrow fabric, and start spinning!

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DIY Ironing Board Cover

DIY ironing board cover

Last year about this time we were working on finishing our ebook.  And if we could do it over again, there is only one thing we would do differently, and that is do today’s post before photographing our step by step pictures.  That is because our old ironing board cover looked like this:

DIY ironing board cover
Pretty sad, huh?  We had read lots of DIY ironing board cover tutorials, but when we went to replace ours, we used none of them!  Deepika, from Pattern Review, replaced hers and put a photo on Instagram. Upon asking what tutorial she used, she gave this simple answer; “I just placed my old cover on top of the fabric, cut around it (you don’t need to be precise) and then used bias tape to finish the edges which also created a casing for the elastic.  Easy-peasy!
So that’s what I did.  But in keeping with the “no compromise” resolution for 2015, instead of using bias tape (because I didn’t have enough of any one kind, and I wasn’t going to compromise by tacking a bunch of different colors together!) I took the extra time to unpick off the casing from the old cover and reused it and the elastic too!  That was an easy $40 to $100 saved!

DIY ironing board cover

This fabric was in the stash, and it’s been treated with Scotchguard which makes it very nice for ironing as the water just beads up rather than soaks in.  I had the batting in my stash too, leftover from the cowboy quilt.
So this project is 100% from the stash and existing materials.  Did you notice the new button on the sidebar?  The one that says Sew My Stash 2015?  We’ve made a commitment to try to use 50% materials from our stash this year on every project we sew.  (No moratorium on fabric buying, you’ll notice!!!)  But it will help us sew through the very large and very beautiful stash of fabric we have purchased and been gifted.
How about you, does your ironing board cover need replaced?  Are you going to do it?

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How to Add a Woven Lining to the Hood of the Bimaa Sweater

How to add a woven lining to the hood of the Bimaa Sweater.

How to add a woven lining to the hood of the Bimaa Sweater.

We snagged a Bimaa Sweater pattern during the Friday Fiver over at Crafterhours, and immediately got to sewing!  Aria had a birthday recently, and so I made her a whole outfit.  That skirt will be coming soon, but for today, I want to show you the Bimaa Sweater, and explain how I added a woven lining to the hood of the Bimaa Sweater.  You see, LouBeeDoo Clothing, who makes the Bimaa, recommends avoiding the temptation of making the hood from woven material because it won’t stretch and fit over their head.  So if you want to add a woven lining to the hood of the Bimaa Sweater, you have to do it like this tutorial.

How to Add a Woven Lining to the Hood of the Bimaa Sweater

How to add a woven lining to the hood of the Bimaa Sweater.

 

Step 1: Mark a line across your hood pattern piece, about 1/4 inch above the jutting out part, as shown.

How to add a woven lining to the hood of the Bimaa Sweater.

Step 2: Cut out the section below the line from knit fabric, adding 1/4 inch to the top.  Cut out the section above the line from woven fabric, adding a 1/4 inch to the bottom for seam allowance.

How to add a woven lining to the hood of the Bimaa Sweater.

Step 3:  Sew the two pieces together.

How to add a woven lining to the hood of the Bimaa Sweater.

Proceed with the pattern directions.  You can cut the middle piece from woven fabric without following the steps above because there will be enough stretch from the knit on the hood pieces.

How to add a woven lining to the hood of the Bimaa Sweater.

I really admire all the versions of the Bimaa Sweater that I’ve seen, and can’t wait to make the cowl neck version and the shawl collar version too.  I just wish the Bimaa Sweater came in adult sizes!

How to add a woven lining to the hood of the Bimaa Sweater.

The only other change I made to the Bimaa Sweater pattern was to lengthen the cuffs.  I’m sure Aria gets her long arms from me!  When she tried on the Bimaa Sweater she loved it except the sleeves were too short, so the easiest thing was to lengthen the cuffs.  And she thinks long cuffs look better on her than short cuffs.  I tend to agree with her for larger sizes.

How to add a woven lining to the hood of the Bimaa Sweater.

So now you know how to add a woven lining to the hood of the Bimaa Sweater!  Have fun!

How to add a woven lining to the hood of the Bimaa Sweater.

 

The Bimaa Sweater is very fast and easy to sew…as long as you don’t have to go back and add sleeve length!  But even then, I made the Bimaa Sweater in just one afternoon.

How to add a woven lining to the hood of the Bimaa Sweater.The soft chocolaty brown knit is from JoAnn’s.  The Cotton + Steel hood lining is from Pink Chalk Fabrics.  The skirt…coming soon!

How to add a woven lining to the hood of the Bimaa Sweater.

Linking up here:

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Fast DIY Kimono Tutorial In 4 Easy Steps

Fast DIY Kimono Tutorial in 4 Easy Steps

Fast DIY Kimono Tutorial in 4 Easy Steps

DIY Kimono Tutorial in 4 easy steps.

During Kids Clothes Week, I made a kimono for my tween and promised a tutorial.  That’s what I have for you today, a quick and easy DIY Kimono Tutorial in 4 easy steps.  Why another DIY Kimono Tutorial, when the internet is full of them?  Mine’s easier, I promise!  How do I know this?  Well, a few weeks ago, my printer was out of ink (trust me, I’m getting there!) so I couldn’t print and make the skirt for All The Skirts that I wanted to, so I decided to try a kimono and started looking over all the tutorials out there.  Many were too complicated or confusing to even follow, but I muddled through enough of them to know there was an easier way to do it.  You see, kimonos are usually made out of some slightly sheer material like chiffon or something that frays and is hard to work with.  So the best way to do it is to make the least amount of exposed edges.  Less exposed edges means less fraying and fewer edges to have to keep from fraying.  So here’s the easy 4-step DIY Kimono Tutorial:

DIY Kimono Tutorial in 4 quick steps.

Pretty easy, huh?  But in case that leaves you with a few questions, here is a picture tutorial.

DIY Kimono Tutorial in 4 quick steps.

Begin with a rectangle of fabric double your desired finished length X width of fabric.  Fold this rectangle in half, right sides together.

DIY Kimono Tutorial in 4 quick steps.Cut an “A” shape through ONE layer only, with the top of the “A” hitting in the center of the fabric.  (Eyeball it!)

DIY Kimono Tutorial in 4 quick steps.

On one edge, measure down 12-18 inches from the fold, and start pinning there.  Pin across 12-18 inches, then down to the bottom edge of the fabric.   Repeat on other side.

DIY Kimono Tutorial in 4 quick steps.

Sew the two layers together following the pins.  Repeat on other side.

Step5

Cut away the excess close to your seam.

DIY Kimono Tutorial in 4 quick steps.

If you don’t have a serger, zigzag the edge.

DIY Kimono Tutorial in 4 quick steps.

Fold over two times to make a tiny hem around the sleeves.  Fold and hem around the bottom and up and down the front opening all in one continuous seam.

DIY Kimono Tutorial in 4 quick steps.

Strut it in your new kimono baby!  I realize my kimono fabric is a lot like Annie from The Enantiomer Project,  but I do think her kimono is the prettiest I’ve ever seen and wanted to duplicate it as close as possible.  I found my fabric at JoAnns.

DIY Kimono Tutorial in 4 quick steps.

I didn’t know I needed a kimono until I made this one!  Now I wear it a lot.

Easy DIY Kimono Tutorial

It’s a great way to be able to nurse discreetly in public…all that flow-yness is so awesome!

DIY Kimono Tutorial in 4 quick steps.

This DIY Kimono Tutorial is so fast you’ll have time to make it and a decent supper tonight…what are you waiting for?

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Ethan Vest Tutorial

vest tutorial

If you are coming over from Sew Cool For the Tween Scene, Hi and welcome!  Today we have a vest tutorial for everyone.  We promised to show you how we modified the Ethan Shirt from Sis Boom patterns to make the vest Thomas is wearing with his Ethan Shirt.  This could be done with any button up shirt pattern.

Ethan shirt

We wanted to use the Ethan Shirt pattern pieces to make the vest because we wanted it to be the same size as the Ethan Shirt we had made him so the two would fit nicely together.  So we took our pattern pieces we’d used to make the Ethan Shirt that were already cut out to the exact size we needed and folded them to make the shape we wanted for the vest.  It’s really easier to show you so here is the back piece:

vest tutorial

We placed the back yoke on top of the shirt back piece and lined them up at the armholes and pinned them in place.  Then we folded up the bottom of the back so that it ended 1/2 inch longer than we wanted the finished length.  We cut two pattern back pattern pieces of lining material.

Next we modified the front piece by folding it like this:

vest tutorial

So again we changed the bottom, but folded it into a v shape after folding up the bottom of the pattern piece to make it the right shape.  Then we folded over the edge of the shirt front to make the v shape down the front.  We cut out two of each of lining and of fabric.

For the actual sewing of the lined vest, I used this tutorial over at Shwin & Shwin.  It was perfect and looks just as good on the inside as it does on the outside!  The buttons came from a vest I made myself from Pendleton wool a long time ago.  The moths had helped themselves to the Pendleton wool, and so the vest was no longer wearable!  But the buttons were useable!

Project Run and Play 80s cartoon inspired Richie Rich by Skirt Fixation

In case you are wondering, I used the free pattern and tutorial from Sew Like My Mom to sew the bow tie.  I only shortened it to match my son’s neck size.  And watched several YouTube videos to figure that part out.  But now I know!

Be sure to go over to Sew Cool for the Tween Scene tomorrow where I am reviewing the Ethan Shirt in tween sizes, which I’ve made 3 times now.  I have some photos of the tween together in their Ethan Shirts, so you don’t want to miss that!

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How to Add a Lining to the Jocole Yoga A-Line Skirt

How to add a lining to the Jocole Yoga A-Line skirt

How to add a lining to the Jocole Yoga A-Line skirt

As I promised yesterday, I have a tutorial for how to add a lining to the Jocole Yoga A-line skirt.

  • When you are cutting out the skirt, cut out an additional front and back pieces on the fold of knit lining fabric, but cut the lining fabric 3-6 inches shorter than your finished length of the skirt.
  • Complete step 1 and 2 of the lining fabric also, making a tube of the lining.
  • Before step 13, slip your lining inside your skirt, wrong sides together, matching up the top edges.
  • When you pin and stitch in steps 13 and 14, be sure to catch your lining fabric also.  You will be sewing four layers together, the lining, the skirt, and two waistband layers.

That’s it!  Just a few easy steps, and you can add a lining to the Jocole Yoga A-line skirt.   So now you can use some of the totally awesome, sheer fabrics that are on the market right now.

Like this awesome light mocha rose matte stretch lace knit fabric from Girl Charlee.

Or this burnout knit we saw the other day at JoAnn Fabrics.

Now for the other part of what we promised you yesterday.  How to downsize the Jocole Yoga A-Line skirt for a tween.  Here’s where it gets kind of math-y, so if you want to just skip down to the giveaway, we forgive you!

Take your tween’s measurements for waist and hips and enter them into this equation:

Tween’s size/Pattern size measurement= Decimal Number

Take the first 2 numbers of the decimal and set your printer to scale to that size.  For example:

Aria’s waist measurement is 24 inches.  The pattern measurement for size medium is 28 inches.  Divide these two numbers and you get .85714286  The first two numbers round to 86, so I enter 86% in my printer’s scale option.  To determine the proper length, I recommend just printing out the pattern and measuring the length on the child you want to make it and add on the hem allowance and make the skirt that finished length.  Or else you can compute your percentage from above and apply that to the pattern’s finished length and do some more math!  You choose.

Jocole Yoga A-Line skirt tween size

One last thing before the giveaway, please notice how well we matched up the ruffles at the side seams.  Thank you!  Now onto the giveaway.  This is the last day to enter the giveaway for 2 free Jocole PDF patterns of your choice.  We’ll see you tomorrow for information about my top in this picture!

Back of Jocole Yoga A-Line Skirt

a Rafflecopter giveaway

See you tomorrow!

Audrey