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Maternity Cheyenne Tunic Tutorial

2 tutorials from Skirt Fixation on how to make the Cheyenne Tunic suitable for maternity wear

Before I start Handmade Baby posts, I have one final maternity post for you.  A while back, Sarah from The Crazy Tailor suggested I should figure out how to hack the Cheyenne Tunic pattern to make it suitable for maternity wear.  As is usual with a sewing challenge, my mind worked on the problem until I finally figured out a solution…for each view!

2 tutorials from Skirt Fixation on how to make the Cheyenne Tunic suitable for maternity wear

To keep myself motivated to get the project done, I challenged Emily of @enjoyful_makes on Instagram to a sew off because she’s a fellow fan of Hey June Handmade and also expecting a baby.  We were each to take a Hey June Handmade pattern and hack it for maternity wear.

2 tutorials from Skirt Fixation on how to make the Cheyenne Tunic suitable for maternity wear

Let’s start with View A, the full button front.  The trick was deciding where to add the ease to allow for a rounded belly.

2 tutorials from Skirt Fixation on how to make the Cheyenne Tunic suitable for maternity wear

Step 1: Cut apart the front pattern piece below the bottom of the bust.  For me this was on the shorten/lengthen line.  If I were to do it again, I could even go an inch or so above that line.  Cut out the top half as normal, just adding seam allowance to the bottom of the piece.  When you cut out the bottom half of the pattern piece, cut out 3 extra inches across the front and add the seam allowance to the top as well.  I also added length to the bottom of the tunic, but this was probably not necessary.

2 tutorials from Skirt Fixation on how to make the Cheyenne Tunic suitable for maternity wear

Step 2:  Make pleats to gather in the extra 3 inches.  I made 3 pleats, each facing away from the center front, located in the center of each front piece.  Alternately, you could make 1 box pleat.  You just want your pleats/gathering to end up drawing in the extra 3 inches you added.

2 tutorials from Skirt Fixation on how to make the Cheyenne Tunic suitable for maternity wear

Step 3:  Sew the front and bottom pieces together so you have a whole front piece.  To make the Cheyenne Tunic last the entire pregnancy, sew these 2 pieces together WRONG sides together.  This will make the inside of your shirt look as pretty at this seam as at the rest of the shirt.  After you have the shirt completed, sew a ribbon or tie over the top of this seam covering up the exposed edges and dangling off the side seams.  This will allow you to wear the shirt at all stages of pregnancy, included the smaller months as the ties can draw in the extra width as you grow.

2 tutorials from Skirt Fixation on how to make the Cheyenne Tunic suitable for maternity wear

I did not do this on my shirt because I am nearing the end of my pregnancy.  So I sewed the top and bottom halves of the fronts together RIGHT sides together.  I pressed the seam up and zigzagged the raw edges on the inside.  Then I finished assembling the front pieces according to the pattern.

2 tutorials from Skirt Fixation on how to make the Cheyenne Tunic suitable for maternity wear

And there you have it…a maternity Cheyenne Tunic, View A.  I often wear this one with one of my maternity Runway Skirts.  I made the Cheyenne in black stretch sateen from JoAnn Fabrics.  I love this fabric for the Cheyenne Tunic very much, and will probably make myself another non maternity version in the fall!

2 tutorials from Skirt Fixation on how to make the Cheyenne Tunic suitable for maternity wear

Now for View B…which is super, super simple.  This is the maternity Cheyenne tunic hack I actually figured out first.

2 tutorials from Skirt Fixation on how to make the Cheyenne Tunic suitable for maternity wear

Step 1:  Cut out the front piece as shown.  The center front will be 3 inches away from the fold.  Cut down the front down to the “cut here for placket” marking.  At that point, pivot and cut out to the fold of the fabric.  Again I added length to the tunic length which was not necessary.  But I’m very tall, so it ended up okay.

2 tutorials from Skirt Fixation on how to make the Cheyenne Tunic suitable for maternity wear

Step 2:  Sew 2 gathering stitches just below the bottom of the placket.

2 tutorials from Skirt Fixation on how to make the Cheyenne Tunic suitable for maternity wear

Step 3:  Gather this very tightly.  You probably won’t be able to get it exactly back to the original shape, but the bottom point of the placket will cover up the gaping part.

2 tutorials from Skirt Fixation on how to make the Cheyenne Tunic suitable for maternity wear

Easy-peasy, and you have a View B maternity-ized Cheyenne Shirt!  The fabric from this one came from Hancock Fabrics going out of business sale and indigo Robert Kaufman chambray union fabric leftover from this skirt.

2 tutorials from Skirt Fixation on how to make the Cheyenne Tunic suitable for maternity wear

This tutorial can probably be used with any button up shirt pattern, but I definitely recommend the Cheyenne Tunic pattern from Hey June Handmade.  All the seams are beautifully finished on the inside and it’s such a lovely, professional shirt!

Affiliate links are used in this post, but only to products which I’ve personally used and loved!  If you click on them you too will find something you love…and I might make a few pennies!

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Welt Pocket with Contrast Lining Tutorial

Free tutorial from Skirt Fixation on how to make contrast lining inside welt pockets.

Free tutorial from Skirt Fixation on how to make contrast lining inside welt pockets.

Today I’ve got a tutorial on how to make a welt pocket with contrast lining inside the pockets.  You know for a pop of hidden fun, like a secret just the two of you share.  Or if you don’t have enough fabric for the pockets, but your garment needs pockets!

Creating welt pockets isn’t too difficult, and a good pattern or tutorial will walk you through all the steps and you will end up with a beautifully finished welt pocket.  This tutorial today shows you how to use contrast fabric inside the pocket while still keeping your welt the same fabric as the main part of the garment.  Cut the pocket bag piece from your contrast fabric.

Free tutorial from Skirt Fixation on how to make contrast lining inside welt pockets.

Step 1:

Sew contrast lining to pants around welt rectangle right sides together.

Free tutorial from Skirt Fixation on how to make contrast lining inside welt pockets.

Step 2:

Cut open rectangle, cutting into corners but not through stitching.

Free tutorial from Skirt Fixation on how to make contrast lining inside welt pockets.

Step 3:

Pull contrast lining to inside of pocket.

Step 4:

Press opening very well making sure contrast lining does not show on outside of pocket.

Free tutorial from Skirt Fixation on how to make contrast lining inside welt pockets.

Step 5:

Cut a welt the width of pocket bag by 2.5” high from original garment fabric.

Free tutorial from Skirt Fixation on how to make contrast lining inside welt pockets.

Step 6:

Fold this welt in 1/2, wrong sides together, and press.

Free tutorial from Skirt Fixation on how to make contrast lining inside welt pockets.

Step 7:

Zigzag or finish across bottom raw edges.

Free tutorial from Skirt Fixation on how to make contrast lining inside welt pockets.

Step 8:

Fit your newly created welt into the top of the pocket hole on the wrong side of the pants, top edges lined up, and sides of pocket bag and welt lined up.

Free tutorial from Skirt Fixation on how to make contrast lining inside welt pockets.

Here I am pulling the top of the pocket open so you can see the alignment of the welt.

Free tutorial from Skirt Fixation on how to make contrast lining inside welt pockets.

Step 9:

On the right side of the fabric, top stitch around the opening of the pocket rectangle.

Free tutorial from Skirt Fixation on how to make contrast lining inside welt pockets.

Here’s the view on the inside.  Now you’ve created the matching welt, so just finish the pocket bag.

Free tutorial from Skirt Fixation on how to make contrast lining inside welt pockets.

Step 10:

Fold pocket bag in 1/2, right sides together.

Free tutorial from Skirt Fixation on how to make contrast lining inside welt pockets.

Step 11:

Sew sides of pocket bag together, taking care NOT to sew through pants/garment you are creating.  Finish edges of pocket bag.

Then assemble your pants/garment according to your pattern.  I was sewing a pair of pants for my son.  I’ll show them to you later this week.

All right, there you have it!  A beautiful welt pocket with a secret inside!  If you use this tutorial, send us a picture of your beautiful creation.

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Finished Hem Bands Tutorial (perfect for thick fabrics!)

 

Now your hem bands can be beautiful on the inside too!

Have you ever wondered how to sew a finished hem or cuff band?  Usually these bands are left with raw edges on the insides.  Our tutorial shows you how to create hem bands that are finished on the inside.  This method also works really good for very thick fabrics.  Perhaps you want your garment to be as pretty on the inside as on the outside.  Maybe you’re worried about fraying raw edges.  Or perhaps you’re trying to reduce the thickness of the seams.  For all those reasons you need this tutorial.

Create hem bands beautifully finished on the inside!

Step 1:

Lay the hem (or cuff) band down on the main fabric right sides together (RST).  Do NOT fold the band in 1/2 as you may be used to doing with other patterns.  Sew together using the seam allowance required in your pattern.

Create hem bands beautifully finished on the inside!

Step 2:

Iron seam allowances toward band.

Create hem bands beautifully finished on the inside!

Step 3:

Iron over seam allowance on other side of hem band.

Create hem bands beautifully finished on the inside!

Step 4:

Fold hem band in 1/2 wrong sides together. (WST)  Overlap and nest the raw edge right up next to the seam on the wrong side of the fabric.

Create hem bands beautifully finished on the inside!

Step 5:

Pin very well.  You don’t want this hem band to twist at all, so pinning now will make your life easier in the next step.

Create hem bands beautifully finished on the inside!

Step 6:

Sew the hem band in place.

Now for this tutorial, I am sewing a cardigan (Peekaboo Pattern Shop Cambridge Cardigan affiliate link) that has a band/neck binding around the front neckline and down the fronts.  So the rest of this tutorial shows you how to sew on that second band and end up with a finished inside all the way around.  If you are sewing a band that will be round, like a cuff or a sweatshirt hem band, simply sew on the band following this tutorial before you sew the side seams, which is when the band will be completed.

Create hem bands beautifully finished on the inside!

Step 7:

Pin the neck binding to the cardigan fronts RST, leaving a 1/4 inch hanging over at each end.  Sew in place.  Iron seam allowance toward binding as before.

Create hem bands beautifully finished on the inside!

Step 8:

Iron up the 1/4 inch overhang at the end of the neck binding.

Create hem bands beautifully finished on the inside!

Step 9:

Iron over 1/4 inch along the outer edge of the neck binding.

Create hem bands beautifully finished on the inside!

Step 10:

Fold neck binding in 1/2.  Nest the seam allowances as in Step 4.  Sew across bottom, up one side, around the neck, down the other side, and across the other bottom.

So there you have it.  Beautifully finished bands.  Whether it be cuffs, hems or neck bindings, you can now create hem bands another way.

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Dollhouse Skirt – New FREE Pattern

FREE Dollhouse Skirt pattern from Skirt Fixation.

Last year, we were inspired by Skirting the Issue to create a free girl’s skirt pattern, the Pegasus Skirt.  This year we decided to do the same.  We are completely over the moon about the release of our second free skirt pattern, The Dollhouse Skirt.

FREE Dollhouse Skirt pattern from Skirt Fixation.

Today we are contributing to Skirting The Issue with this free pattern for the occasion.  We challenge you to sew one up and donate it to a girl in need.

FREE Dollhouse Skirt pattern from Skirt Fixation.

The Dollhouse Skirt is an elastic waist skirt perfect for any doll loving girl.  The skirt is color blocked to resemble a dollhouse, and there are multiple window pockets for storing a doll and her treasures.  The door actually opens and latches closed with a button.  The windows are created from clear vinyl so it is just like a real dollhouse!  Think of how long this interactive skirt will keep her occupied!

FREE Dollhouse Skirt pattern from Skirt Fixation.

The Dollhouse Skirt can be made for any girl from 12 months to 10 years.  You choose the length, mini, midi or even maxi!  The Dollhouse includes clear helpful photo instructions for every step.  If you’ve never made a skirt before, don’t worry, if you can sew a straight line, you can make this skirt.  And even though it looks very intricate, we’re confident you can sew up the Dollhouse Skirt in a couple of hours like we did.

FREE Dollhouse Skirt pattern from Skirt Fixation.

You can get a free copy of the Dollhouse Skirt on Craftsy.  We’ve chosen Craftsy as the host for the Dollhouse Skirt, just as we did for our free Pegasus Skirt pattern for these reasons:

1: Craftsy allows us to get the skirt to you with no fees or charges, which keeps The Pegasus Skirt free! (It’s also free for you to sign up, if you aren’t already a member.)

2: Craftsy is a community of talented makers, and we want to be counted among them.

3: In the Craftsy community, makers are challenged to grow, learn and create greater and greater things, and that is at the heart of the Dollhouse Skirt.

FREE Dollhouse Skirt pattern from Skirt Fixation.

We really want you to try our FREE Dollhouse Skirt pattern, and we’d love to see what you make, so be sure to use the hashtag #dollhouseskirt on social media.  There are so many different fabric and color combinations that could be used to make the Dollhouse Skirt pattern.  We can’t wait to see your Dollhouse Skirt.  So hop over to Craftsy, pick up your free copy of the Dollhouse skirt, and start sewing one today (hopefully for a girl in need!)

FREE Dollhouse Skirt pattern from Skirt Fixation.

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10 FREE Reversible Skirt Tutorials {Skirting the Issue}

10 FREE reversible skirt tutorials

10 FREE reversible skirt tutorials

What’s better than one skirt?  One skirt that can be worn two ways!  Reversible skirts are so fun and a very, very sweet gift to give to a foster girl.  So we rounded up these 10 FREE tutorials that you can make for your child or donate to a good cause like Skirting The Issue.  Alright, here’s the 10 FREE reversible skirt tutorials.  And if you’d prefer a pattern, scroll down to the end for some reversible skirt pattern suggestions.  Keep in mind several of these tutorials are for women’s sizes which work wonderfully for older girls in foster care where the need for donations is greater.

10 FREE Reversible Skirt Tutorials:

Circle Skirt by You & Me

Paperbag Skirt by Petit a Petit & family for The Sewing Rabbit

Balloon Skirt by Zierstoff

Wrap skirt by Andrea DeHart for Makezine

Domesticated Skirt by Sew A Straight Line

Scalloped Hem by Bored & Crafty

Zippered Bali Skirt by So Sew Easy

Circle Wrap Skirt by Girl Inspired

Reversible Pencil Skirt

Pencil Skirt by Bumbling Panda

Petal Skirt by Pretty Prudent

Girl’s Reversible Skirt Patterns:

Oliver + S Hula Hoop Skirt

Oliver + S Swingset Skirt

Violette Field Threads Lavinia Skirt

Thanks for stopping by today and happy skirt sewing!

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Forest Friends Pouch Tutorial

Free tutorial to make Forest Animal Pouches from Skirt Fixation

Free tutorial to make Forest Animal Pouches from Skirt Fixation

Did you fall in love with those sweet little forest friends pouches like we did yesterday?  With the leftover scraps from the Forest Floor Fabrics blog tour, we created these cute animal pouches, and today we’re going to teach you how!

Forest Friends Pouch Tutorial

Supplies:

Forest Friends Pocket pattern from Violette Field Threads.

Fabric Scraps (our specific fabric information at end of post)

Interfacing  (I used Pellon SF-101)

4 inch zippers – I used these:  

Buttons, ribbon, fake flowers, embellishments

Instructions:

Before you begin sewing, cut out interfacing for the head pieces and iron them onto the wrong side of the fabric.  This will enable your pouches to be structured rather than floppy.

Make the pockets as instructed, not including sewing on the buttons and embellishments.

Free tutorial to make Forest Animal Pouches from Skirt Fixation

Then, sew a 3 inch zipper to one side of the face. Gently curve the zipper to match the curve of the face.

Free tutorial to make Forest Animal Pouches from Skirt Fixation

Sew the other side of the zipper to the other side of the face, carefully lining up the ends and curving the zipper along the face as before.

Now, sew on the button eyes and any other embellishments you desire.

Cut a short length of ribbon and pin it in a loop just behind the animal’s ears.  This will be the handle.

Free tutorial to make Forest Animal Pouches from Skirt Fixation

Next, fold the two halves wrong sides together, sandwiching the zipper in between, and topstitch around the whole pouch, beginning at one end of the zipper and ending at the other end.

Finally, sew on the nose buttons.

One additional note: we embedded pipe cleaners in the rabbit’s ears because they are long and could be floppy without the pipe cleaners.  Unless you want floppy ears, of course!

Here is a list of fabrics we used to make these Forest Friends pouches:

Art Gallery Forest Floor Wild Posy Flora: Deer Head, Raccoon Ear

Art Gallery Forest Floor Luna Rising Shadow: Fox Head, Bunny Ears

Art Gallery Forest Floor Timber Nightfall: Raccoon Head, Fox Face

Art Gallery Forest Floor Capped Dim: Raccoon Eye, Deer Ears

Art Gallery Forest Floor Maple Mill Fog: Fox Ears

Art Gallery Forest Floor Jersey Knit Laced Moss: Deer Face

Art Gallery Forest Floor Jersey Knit Flourish: Rabbit Head

Free tutorial to make Forest Animal Pouches from Skirt Fixation

Let us know if you use this tutorial, we’d love to see your Forest Friends pouch creations!

Affiliate links have been used in this post because after all our hard work of sewing, we like to relax with a little fabric shopping…and every penny helps!

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Birthday #3 {Project Sew It}

Knight Hoodie for Project Sew It

project+sew+it+grey

There’s something inspirational going on this year.  Celina of Petit a Petit and Family created Project Sew It.  You can read all about it here, but the basic premise is to sew one thing every month.  I’m putting my own twist on it by sewing one thing for each of my nieces and nephews for their birthdays this year.  It won’t end up being once per month, and sometimes it’ll be more than once per month, but it’s my goal!  I sew so much for my kids, that I want to share the sewing love.

For the third birthday of my nieces and nephews, I decided to sew another Knight Hoodie.  This particular nephew has officially entered those hard to sew for boy years!  An adoring aunt has to be careful about using cute-sy fabric and babyish patterns.  Since my son Thomas (who is a year older than this nephew) likes and wears his Knight Hoodie often, I thought it would be a safe choice.  I’ve also sewn a Knight Hoodie for another son, David, who is quite a bit younger, so I think the Knight Hoodie is a particularly good choice for any boy…and even a girl!

Knight Hoodie

I had the opportunity to try this Knight Hoodie on my nephew before giving it to him, which was really fortunate due to the armholes not being wide enough to layer another shirt underneath.  Kind of the whole point of a hoodie, right?

Knight Hoodie for Project Sew It

It looks like my nephew loves his new Knight Hoodie!  Apparently his family had recently attended a Medieval Festival and they are hooked on all things Medieval, so this Knight Hoodie was perfect timing!

I also wanted to share a quick tip on how to get pockets to line up across a zipper because it’s something I’ve struggled with often and spent quality time with my seam ripper over and over again.

How to line up a zipper to pockets.

To begin, sew on one side of the zipper to the garment.  Then use chalk or some other marking tool to mark the top and the bottom of the pockets on both sides of the zipper.

How to line up a zipper with pockets.

Put the other side of the zipper in place, carefully lining up the marks at the top and bottom of the zipper and sew in place.  Easy and a successful pocket match up the first time, every time!  Now if only I can remember to use my own tip the next time I install a zipper!

Thanks to my sister for the photos of her son in his Knight Hoodie.

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5 Ways to Learn to Sew

5 Ways to Learn to Sew

5 Ways to Learn to Sew

We realize that not all of our blog readers have the ability to sew.  And as you know, we think sewing is a very worthwhile endeavor!  The satisfaction of creating something from raw material to finished product is like no other.  So today, we’ve compiled a list of ways you could learn to sew.

1. Learn to sew by taking a class online:

We’ve taken a class on Craftsy, and we can really recommend it as a way to learn to sew, or to learn a new sewing technique.  The classes are video tutorials and are well worth their money.  Beside learning from an accomplished instructor, you also receive at least one pattern, and there is a good format for interacting with your instructor and fellow students.  This is the best way to learn to sew in your own time because once you purchase a class, it’s yours forever and you can take it at your own pace.  Here are some absolute beginner classes we found on Craftsy.

Garment Basics

Sew Ready: Garment Basics (affiliate link)

What: Learn to sew a pencil skirt.

Length: Almost 4 hours instruction.

Price: 24.99

A-line Skirt

Design and Sew an A-line Skirt (affiliate link)

How Many: 5000 taken this class

Length: Over 4.5 hours instruction

Price: 29.99

Sewing Studio

Sewing Studio (affiliate link)

What: Learn Machine & Sewing basics  by making a pillow and skirt

Length: Over 6 hours instruction

Price: 29.99

2 Learn to Sew by taking a class in a store:

Many fabric stores offer classes in sewing.  You can choose from classes at your big box store, or a smaller more intimate class from your LQS, or local quilt shop.

For example, Sewing 101 at your local Jo-Anns will cost you $35, includes sewing supplies, and lasts 2.5 hours.  If you don’t yet have a sewing machine or have too many distractions at home and need the accountability of a class in person, this may be the best choice for you.

3 Learn to Sew by finding a mentor:

Skirting the Issue by Skirt Fixation

Let’s say you know someone who sews.  Ask them to teach you!  We’ve gladly taught others to sew, and you’ll find most seamstress glad to share their knowledge.  This is the oldest, and probably most tried and true method of learning to sew.

4 Learn to Sew by YouTube-ing it:

Made Everyday

It’s been said you can learn anything on YouTube, and sewing is no exception.  Some of our favorite sewing channels are:

Made Everyday with Dana  

Dana makes you WANT to sew everything, and she makes it easy and professional looking too.

Melly Sews

Melly’s channel is a weath of information, just like her website.  Plus she has some really quick and easy tutorials to get you started sewing something in no time.

Inside The Hem

This is a new collaboration by 3 experienced seamstresses.  We like what they’ve done so far, like demystifying reading a pattern, and we can’t wait to see what else they come up with.

5 Learn to sew by just diving in:

O+S by difficulty

When we review a pattern, we often give it a rating.  Sometimes we’ll even recommend a certain pattern for an absolute beginner.  There are some indie pattern companies that are known for their teaching abilities.  Oliver+S is a company we can highly recommend as we’ve sewn all their skirt patterns as part of our All The Skirts series.  Each Oliver+S pattern has a scissors rating from 1 to 4.    If you started by sewing all the 1 scissors patterns, and worked your way through them, by the end you would have an absolutely comprehensive sewing knowledge, and your child/children would have a stunning wardrobe too!   Each pattern also lists which skills are used, which is very useful!

That’s it for our top 5 methods to learn to sew!  Which looks the best for you?  Any other recommendations?

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Child Suede-Backed Sherpa Vest Tutorial

Suede-backed Sherpa Vest tutorial by Skirt Fixation. This vest is also reversible.

Suede-backed Sherpa Vest tutorial by Skirt Fixation.  This vest is also reversible.

Today I have that tutorial I promised for a reversible suede-back sherpa vest for children.  We found our Luxury Faux Fur-Sherpa Suede Gray at JoAnn Fabrics.  It is normally 24.99 per yard, but for a child’s vest you probably only need 1/2 yard.  Plus if you sign up for it, JoAnns will send you great coupons.  This fabric also comes in chocolate brown and light tan.  For a pattern we used the front and back pieces from the Downton Duffle Jacket from Peekaboo Pattern Shop but any shirt front and back pattern pieces will work.  All right, let’s get started on that reversible suede and sherpa vest.

Suede-backed Sherpa Vest tutorial by Skirt Fixation.  This vest is also reversible.

Step 1:  Cut out your back and front pieces from suede-back sherpa fabric.

Suede-backed Sherpa Vest tutorial by Skirt Fixation.  This vest is also reversible.

Step 2: Cut your front and back pieces in 1/2 horizontally about 2” below the bottom of the armholes.

Suede-backed Sherpa Vest tutorial by Skirt Fixation.  This vest is also reversible.

Now you have 6 pieces.

Suede-backed Sherpa Vest tutorial by Skirt Fixation.  This vest is also reversible.

Step 3: Place your back pieces together SHERPA sides together and sew with a 1” seam allowance.

Suede-backed Sherpa Vest tutorial by Skirt Fixation.  This vest is also reversible.

Step 4: Open up the seam allowance on the SUEDE side of the fabric and edge stitch each seam allowance in place.  Repeat steps 3 & 4 for front pieces.

Suede-backed Sherpa Vest tutorial by Skirt Fixation.  This vest is also reversible.

Now you are back to 3 pieces!

Suede-backed Sherpa Vest tutorial by Skirt Fixation.  This vest is also reversible.

Step 5: Fold over the 1/2” of the fabric at the neck on the front pieces to the SUEDE side and edge stitch in place.  Repeat for back piece.

Suede-backed Sherpa Vest tutorial by Skirt Fixation.  This vest is also reversible.

Step 6: Fold over 1” of the SHERPA side to the SUEDE side along the hem of the front pieces and edge stitch in place.  Repeat for the back piece.

Suede-backed Sherpa Vest tutorial by Skirt Fixation.  This vest is also reversible.

Now you have your hems finished.

Suede-backed Sherpa Vest tutorial by Skirt Fixation.  This vest is also reversible.

Step 7: Sew the shoulder seams with the SHERPA sides together with a 1” seam allowance.  Open up the seam allowance on the SUEDE side of the fabric and edge stitch each seam allowance in place.

Suede-backed Sherpa Vest tutorial by Skirt Fixation.  This vest is also reversible.

Step 8:  Fold over 1/2” of the SHERPA fabric at the armholes to the SUEDE side and edge stitch in place.

Suede-backed Sherpa Vest tutorial by Skirt Fixation.  This vest is also reversible.

Step 9:  Sew the side seams by placing the SHERPA sides together with a 1” seam allowance.  Open up the seam allowance on the SUEDE side of the fabric and edge stitch each seam allowance in place.

Suede-backed Sherpa Vest tutorial by Skirt Fixation.  This vest is also reversible.

Step 10:  Fold over 1” of the Sherpa fabric at the fronts to the SUEDE side and edge stitch in place.

Suede-backed Sherpa Vest tutorial by Skirt Fixation.  This vest is also reversible.

Step 11: Apply your snaps according to manufacture’s directions.  It does take a little while to work the prongs through 2 layers of this fabric.  Just take your time, it’s worth it in the end!

Suede-backed Sherpa Vest tutorial by Skirt Fixation.  This vest is also reversible.

If you wish to use this vest as the lining in a jacket like we did, attach snaps to the insides of your jacket lining before constructing the jacket.

Suede-backed Sherpa Vest tutorial by Skirt Fixation.  This vest is also reversible.

Now you’re finished!!!  You’ve made a reversible suede-backed sherpa vest.

Suede-backed Sherpa Vest tutorial by Skirt Fixation.  This vest is also reversible.

Here you can see the little man wearing the vest with the sherpa side out.  The snaps make this vest fully reversible.

Suede-backed Sherpa Vest tutorial by Skirt Fixation.  This vest is also reversible.

You can see a few pieces of sherpa on the sleeves of the little man’s black shirt.  You don’t finish the edges of the exposed seams because this fabric doesn’t fray.  They will shed a few pieces of sherpa for a little while, but if you stick your vest in the dryer (on air fluff) for a few minutes, all those pieces will come off.

Suede-backed Sherpa Vest tutorial by Skirt Fixation.  This vest is also reversible.

The washing instructions for this fabric are: Machine wash cold, gentle cycle.  Non-chlorine bleach.  Line Dry.  Cool iron.

Suede-backed Sherpa Vest tutorial by Skirt Fixation.  This vest is also reversible.

You could use this tutorial to make a boy or girl vest, or a vest for yourself!

Suede-backed Sherpa Vest tutorial by Skirt Fixation.  This vest is also reversible.

Let us know if you use this tutorial to make one, we’d love to see it!

Some affiliate links are used in this post, but don’t worry, they won’t hurt you and they might actually help me make a few dollars to support my blogging, sewing and fabric habits!