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DIY Felt Breakfast Food

Free felt breakfast food tutorial by Skirt Fixation for Sew Mama Sew

Today we’re “bringing home” this felt breakfast food post Allegra posted 2 years ago over at Sew Mama Sew.  Her siblings still love to play with this darling, handmade felt breakfast food!

Hi!  I’m Allegra, and I blog over at Skirt Fixation with my mom and sisters. I love embroidery, and combining that with another passion of mine; food, I have fun creating felt food! Felt food is a fun and educational toy that younger children love to touch. My little siblings’ personal favorite out of all of the items that I have made is the felt teabags. I stuff them with real aromatic herbs, and little kids adore smelling them over and over!

Free felt breakfast food tutorial by Skirt Fixation for Sew Mama Sew

Today I have a tutorial for an easy felt breakfast food set including an egg, bacon, pancake and teabag!

FELT EGGS:

Free felt breakfast food tutorial by Skirt Fixation for Sew Mama SewYou will need:

White felt (I use scraps because the eggs aren’t very large)

Yellow felt (I use very small scraps)

White and Yellow embroidery floss.

Very small amount of stuffing.

Free felt breakfast food tutorial by Skirt Fixation for Sew Mama Sew Pin oval egg pattern onto white felt. Cut out two ovals.  Pin egg yolk pattern onto yellow felt. Cut out one.

Free felt breakfast food tutorial by Skirt Fixation for Sew Mama Sew

Place egg yolk on one of the white ovals.  Pin if needed.  With two strands of yellow embroidery floss, begin to stitch the yolk onto one of the ovals. Bring the thread up through the bottom, and then put it through a small distance away.  When the yolk is ¾ of the way sewn down, pause and stuff it with a small amount of stuffing.

Free felt breakfast food tutorial by Skirt Fixation for Sew Mama SewFinish stitching the yolk down.

Free felt breakfast food tutorial by Skirt Fixation for Sew Mama SewBegin to stitch the two white ovals together. To do Blanket Stitch, bring your needle down through the two layers. Pull thread through until just a small loop remains. Put your needle through the loop and pull tight. There are quite a few good tutorials if you type in ‘blanket stitch’ in your preferred search engine.

Stuff the egg with a tiny amount of stuffing if desired.  Finish stitching the egg together.  Repeat to make as many cute little eggs as needed!

 FELT BACON:

Free felt breakfast food tutorial by Skirt Fixation for Sew Mama SewYou will need:

Dark red felt (If you have good-sized scraps, you can use them)

Pink felt (you can use very small scraps)

Pink embroidery floss.

Free felt breakfast food tutorial by Skirt Fixation for Sew Mama Sew

Pin bacon pattern piece pattern to red felt. Cut out one piece.  Out of the pink felt, cut two strips the approximate length of the bacon. These can be rather raggedy as they represent the bacon fat!

Free felt breakfast food tutorial by Skirt Fixation for Sew Mama Sew

Using a regular up-and-down stitch, sew the pink pieces of felt onto the red piece, positioning them so that there is a small space between them. Note: the red felt that I used is wool felt, and so thick that I only poked the needle partway into it, so that the pink stitching doesn’t show on the back.

Repeat these steps to make as much bacon as desired!

FELT PANCAKES:

Free felt breakfast food tutorial by Skirt Fixation for Sew Mama SewNote: If you want to make a plain pancake, simply leave off the syrup and butter pieces, and just stitch the two round pieces of felt together.

You will need:

1 sheet of pancake-brown felt

Dark brown felt (You can use large scraps)

Yellow felt (You can use small scraps)

Dark brown, medium brown, and yellow embroidery floss.

Small amount of stuffing.

Free felt breakfast food tutorial by Skirt Fixation for Sew Mama SewUsing the pancake pattern, cut out two light brown felt circles. Using the dark brown felt, cut out one syrup pattern. Using the yellow felt, cut out two small yellow butter patterns.

Free felt breakfast food tutorial by Skirt Fixation for Sew Mama Sew Put the two small yellow squares together, and stitch them in place on top of the syrup piece. Poke your needle up through the yellow pieces, and back down through the dark brown piece to secure it.

Free felt breakfast food tutorial by Skirt Fixation for Sew Mama SewStitch the dark brown syrup to one of the light brown circles. Use the same stitch as in previous step.

Free felt breakfast food tutorial by Skirt Fixation for Sew Mama Sew Stitch the two light brown circles together ¾ of the way using blanket stitch.

Free felt breakfast food tutorial by Skirt Fixation for Sew Mama Sew

Stuff lightly with stuffing and finish stitching up.

FELT TEABAGS:

Note: These smell really good!

Free felt breakfast food tutorial by Skirt Fixation for Sew Mama SewYou will need:

Scraps of white felt

White and colored embroidery thread

Colored ribbon

Aromatic dried herbs

Free felt breakfast food tutorial by Skirt Fixation for Sew Mama SewUsing the teabag pattern, cut out two pieces. Using the teabag tag pattern, cut out one tag.

Free felt breakfast food tutorial by Skirt Fixation for Sew Mama SewSandwich one end of the ribbon between the tops of the two teabag pieces. Stitch the pieces together using blanket stitch, leaving the bottom open.

Free felt breakfast food tutorial by Skirt Fixation for Sew Mama Sew Stuff the teabag with the dried herb leaves, then sew the bottom shut using blanket stitch. I chose to use spearmint in this teabag.

Free felt breakfast food tutorial by Skirt Fixation for Sew Mama SewOn the other end of the ribbon, fold the tag piece in half and sandwich the ribbon inside of the folded tag piece. Stitch around the tag with colored embroidery floss to close it. I also embroidered a small leaf on the tag for fun.

Free felt breakfast food tutorial by Skirt Fixation for Sew Mama Sew

If you want to see more felt food I’ve made, including a sweet little donut that would go fabulously with this breakfast, go on over to Skirt Fixation and check it out!

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How to Add Faux Fur Cuffs to Any Garment

Skirt Fixation's guide to add faux fur cuffs to any garment.

When I showed you Annie’s winter jacket, I promised a tutorial on how to add faux fur cuffs to any jacket (or garment!)  So that’s what I’ve got for you today.  Be sure to check out my tips for working with faux fur here before you begin.

Skirt Fixation's guide to add faux fur cuffs to any garment.

Step 1:

Measure your sleeve opening and add 1/2 inch.  This will be the width of your cuff.  Decided how tall you want your cuff to be, double it and add 1/2 inch.

Skirt Fixation's guide to add faux fur cuffs to any garment.

Step 2:

Fold your faux fur piece in 1/2 across the width, and sew with 1/2 inch seam allowance.  You will now have a circle of faux fur.

Skirt Fixation's guide to add faux fur cuffs to any garment.

Step 3:

Fold your cuff in 1/2 with the WRONG sides together, matching up the raw edges.

Skirt Fixation's guide to add faux fur cuffs to any garment.

Step 4:

If your jacket has a lining, you will want to separate it from the rest of the sleeve and slide it up the sleeve out of the way before this step.  Slide the cuff over the sleeve, matching the raw edges.  Pin really well, lining up the seams.

Skirt Fixation's guide to add faux fur cuffs to any garment.

Above is the view of what you just did laid out flat.

Skirt Fixation's guide to add faux fur cuffs to any garment.

Step 5:

Sew the cuff to the sleeve, catching both layers of cuff, the outer layer of the jacket and any batting.  But remember, any lining will be pulled up out of the way right now.  I found it easiest to sew this step with the needle INSIDE the sleeve.

If your jacket doesn’t have a lining, you need to finish these edges with a zigzag stitch or serger.  And then you’re done!

Skirt Fixation's guide to add faux fur cuffs to any garment.

If you have a lining, keep going…it’s about to get really pretty on the inside!  Above is what your sleeve looks like right now.

Skirt Fixation's guide to add faux fur cuffs to any garment.

Step 6:

If you have a lining, pull it back down over the raw edges of the cuff and sleeve.  Fold over the raw edges of the lining toward the wrong side by 1/2 inch.  Pin this in place over the raw edges of the cuff and sleeve.

Skirt Fixation's guide to add faux fur cuffs to any garment.

Step 7:

Hand stitch the lining over the cuff.  You will have a beautifully finished inside of your jacket, and an invisible, perfect finish on the outside.

Skirt Fixation's guide to add faux fur cuffs to any garment.

Great job!  Now you can add faux fur cuffs to any jacket!

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Maternity Cheyenne Tunic Tutorial

2 tutorials from Skirt Fixation on how to make the Cheyenne Tunic suitable for maternity wear

Before I start Handmade Baby posts, I have one final maternity post for you.  A while back, Sarah from The Crazy Tailor suggested I should figure out how to hack the Cheyenne Tunic pattern to make it suitable for maternity wear.  As is usual with a sewing challenge, my mind worked on the problem until I finally figured out a solution…for each view!

2 tutorials from Skirt Fixation on how to make the Cheyenne Tunic suitable for maternity wear

To keep myself motivated to get the project done, I challenged Emily of @enjoyful_makes on Instagram to a sew off because she’s a fellow fan of Hey June Handmade and also expecting a baby.  We were each to take a Hey June Handmade pattern and hack it for maternity wear.

2 tutorials from Skirt Fixation on how to make the Cheyenne Tunic suitable for maternity wear

Let’s start with View A, the full button front.  The trick was deciding where to add the ease to allow for a rounded belly.

2 tutorials from Skirt Fixation on how to make the Cheyenne Tunic suitable for maternity wear

Step 1: Cut apart the front pattern piece below the bottom of the bust.  For me this was on the shorten/lengthen line.  If I were to do it again, I could even go an inch or so above that line.  Cut out the top half as normal, just adding seam allowance to the bottom of the piece.  When you cut out the bottom half of the pattern piece, cut out 3 extra inches across the front and add the seam allowance to the top as well.  I also added length to the bottom of the tunic, but this was probably not necessary.

2 tutorials from Skirt Fixation on how to make the Cheyenne Tunic suitable for maternity wear

Step 2:  Make pleats to gather in the extra 3 inches.  I made 3 pleats, each facing away from the center front, located in the center of each front piece.  Alternately, you could make 1 box pleat.  You just want your pleats/gathering to end up drawing in the extra 3 inches you added.

2 tutorials from Skirt Fixation on how to make the Cheyenne Tunic suitable for maternity wear

Step 3:  Sew the front and bottom pieces together so you have a whole front piece.  To make the Cheyenne Tunic last the entire pregnancy, sew these 2 pieces together WRONG sides together.  This will make the inside of your shirt look as pretty at this seam as at the rest of the shirt.  After you have the shirt completed, sew a ribbon or tie over the top of this seam covering up the exposed edges and dangling off the side seams.  This will allow you to wear the shirt at all stages of pregnancy, included the smaller months as the ties can draw in the extra width as you grow.

2 tutorials from Skirt Fixation on how to make the Cheyenne Tunic suitable for maternity wear

I did not do this on my shirt because I am nearing the end of my pregnancy.  So I sewed the top and bottom halves of the fronts together RIGHT sides together.  I pressed the seam up and zigzagged the raw edges on the inside.  Then I finished assembling the front pieces according to the pattern.

2 tutorials from Skirt Fixation on how to make the Cheyenne Tunic suitable for maternity wear

And there you have it…a maternity Cheyenne Tunic, View A.  I often wear this one with one of my maternity Runway Skirts.  I made the Cheyenne in black stretch sateen from JoAnn Fabrics.  I love this fabric for the Cheyenne Tunic very much, and will probably make myself another non maternity version in the fall!

2 tutorials from Skirt Fixation on how to make the Cheyenne Tunic suitable for maternity wear

Now for View B…which is super, super simple.  This is the maternity Cheyenne tunic hack I actually figured out first.

2 tutorials from Skirt Fixation on how to make the Cheyenne Tunic suitable for maternity wear

Step 1:  Cut out the front piece as shown.  The center front will be 3 inches away from the fold.  Cut down the front down to the “cut here for placket” marking.  At that point, pivot and cut out to the fold of the fabric.  Again I added length to the tunic length which was not necessary.  But I’m very tall, so it ended up okay.

2 tutorials from Skirt Fixation on how to make the Cheyenne Tunic suitable for maternity wear

Step 2:  Sew 2 gathering stitches just below the bottom of the placket.

2 tutorials from Skirt Fixation on how to make the Cheyenne Tunic suitable for maternity wear

Step 3:  Gather this very tightly.  You probably won’t be able to get it exactly back to the original shape, but the bottom point of the placket will cover up the gaping part.

2 tutorials from Skirt Fixation on how to make the Cheyenne Tunic suitable for maternity wear

Easy-peasy, and you have a View B maternity-ized Cheyenne Shirt!  The fabric from this one came from Hancock Fabrics going out of business sale and indigo Robert Kaufman chambray union fabric leftover from this skirt.

2 tutorials from Skirt Fixation on how to make the Cheyenne Tunic suitable for maternity wear

This tutorial can probably be used with any button up shirt pattern, but I definitely recommend the Cheyenne Tunic pattern from Hey June Handmade.  All the seams are beautifully finished on the inside and it’s such a lovely, professional shirt!

Affiliate links are used in this post, but only to products which I’ve personally used and loved!  If you click on them you too will find something you love…and I might make a few pennies!

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Welt Pocket with Contrast Lining Tutorial

Free tutorial from Skirt Fixation on how to make contrast lining inside welt pockets.

Free tutorial from Skirt Fixation on how to make contrast lining inside welt pockets.

Today I’ve got a tutorial on how to make a welt pocket with contrast lining inside the pockets.  You know for a pop of hidden fun, like a secret just the two of you share.  Or if you don’t have enough fabric for the pockets, but your garment needs pockets!

Creating welt pockets isn’t too difficult, and a good pattern or tutorial will walk you through all the steps and you will end up with a beautifully finished welt pocket.  This tutorial today shows you how to use contrast fabric inside the pocket while still keeping your welt the same fabric as the main part of the garment.  Cut the pocket bag piece from your contrast fabric.

Free tutorial from Skirt Fixation on how to make contrast lining inside welt pockets.

Step 1:

Sew contrast lining to pants around welt rectangle right sides together.

Free tutorial from Skirt Fixation on how to make contrast lining inside welt pockets.

Step 2:

Cut open rectangle, cutting into corners but not through stitching.

Free tutorial from Skirt Fixation on how to make contrast lining inside welt pockets.

Step 3:

Pull contrast lining to inside of pocket.

Step 4:

Press opening very well making sure contrast lining does not show on outside of pocket.

Free tutorial from Skirt Fixation on how to make contrast lining inside welt pockets.

Step 5:

Cut a welt the width of pocket bag by 2.5” high from original garment fabric.

Free tutorial from Skirt Fixation on how to make contrast lining inside welt pockets.

Step 6:

Fold this welt in 1/2, wrong sides together, and press.

Free tutorial from Skirt Fixation on how to make contrast lining inside welt pockets.

Step 7:

Zigzag or finish across bottom raw edges.

Free tutorial from Skirt Fixation on how to make contrast lining inside welt pockets.

Step 8:

Fit your newly created welt into the top of the pocket hole on the wrong side of the pants, top edges lined up, and sides of pocket bag and welt lined up.

Free tutorial from Skirt Fixation on how to make contrast lining inside welt pockets.

Here I am pulling the top of the pocket open so you can see the alignment of the welt.

Free tutorial from Skirt Fixation on how to make contrast lining inside welt pockets.

Step 9:

On the right side of the fabric, top stitch around the opening of the pocket rectangle.

Free tutorial from Skirt Fixation on how to make contrast lining inside welt pockets.

Here’s the view on the inside.  Now you’ve created the matching welt, so just finish the pocket bag.

Free tutorial from Skirt Fixation on how to make contrast lining inside welt pockets.

Step 10:

Fold pocket bag in 1/2, right sides together.

Free tutorial from Skirt Fixation on how to make contrast lining inside welt pockets.

Step 11:

Sew sides of pocket bag together, taking care NOT to sew through pants/garment you are creating.  Finish edges of pocket bag.

Then assemble your pants/garment according to your pattern.  I was sewing a pair of pants for my son.  I’ll show them to you later this week.

All right, there you have it!  A beautiful welt pocket with a secret inside!  If you use this tutorial, send us a picture of your beautiful creation.

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Finished Hem Bands Tutorial (perfect for thick fabrics!)

 

Now your hem bands can be beautiful on the inside too!

Have you ever wondered how to sew a finished hem or cuff band?  Usually these bands are left with raw edges on the insides.  Our tutorial shows you how to create hem bands that are finished on the inside.  This method also works really good for very thick fabrics.  Perhaps you want your garment to be as pretty on the inside as on the outside.  Maybe you’re worried about fraying raw edges.  Or perhaps you’re trying to reduce the thickness of the seams.  For all those reasons you need this tutorial.

Create hem bands beautifully finished on the inside!

Step 1:

Lay the hem (or cuff) band down on the main fabric right sides together (RST).  Do NOT fold the band in 1/2 as you may be used to doing with other patterns.  Sew together using the seam allowance required in your pattern.

Create hem bands beautifully finished on the inside!

Step 2:

Iron seam allowances toward band.

Create hem bands beautifully finished on the inside!

Step 3:

Iron over seam allowance on other side of hem band.

Create hem bands beautifully finished on the inside!

Step 4:

Fold hem band in 1/2 wrong sides together. (WST)  Overlap and nest the raw edge right up next to the seam on the wrong side of the fabric.

Create hem bands beautifully finished on the inside!

Step 5:

Pin very well.  You don’t want this hem band to twist at all, so pinning now will make your life easier in the next step.

Create hem bands beautifully finished on the inside!

Step 6:

Sew the hem band in place.

Now for this tutorial, I am sewing a cardigan (Peekaboo Pattern Shop Cambridge Cardigan affiliate link) that has a band/neck binding around the front neckline and down the fronts.  So the rest of this tutorial shows you how to sew on that second band and end up with a finished inside all the way around.  If you are sewing a band that will be round, like a cuff or a sweatshirt hem band, simply sew on the band following this tutorial before you sew the side seams, which is when the band will be completed.

Create hem bands beautifully finished on the inside!

Step 7:

Pin the neck binding to the cardigan fronts RST, leaving a 1/4 inch hanging over at each end.  Sew in place.  Iron seam allowance toward binding as before.

Create hem bands beautifully finished on the inside!

Step 8:

Iron up the 1/4 inch overhang at the end of the neck binding.

Create hem bands beautifully finished on the inside!

Step 9:

Iron over 1/4 inch along the outer edge of the neck binding.

Create hem bands beautifully finished on the inside!

Step 10:

Fold neck binding in 1/2.  Nest the seam allowances as in Step 4.  Sew across bottom, up one side, around the neck, down the other side, and across the other bottom.

So there you have it.  Beautifully finished bands.  Whether it be cuffs, hems or neck bindings, you can now create hem bands another way.

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Dollhouse Skirt – New FREE Pattern

FREE Dollhouse Skirt pattern from Skirt Fixation.

Last year, we were inspired by Skirting the Issue to create a free girl’s skirt pattern, the Pegasus Skirt.  This year we decided to do the same.  We are completely over the moon about the release of our second free skirt pattern, The Dollhouse Skirt.

FREE Dollhouse Skirt pattern from Skirt Fixation.

Today we are contributing to Skirting The Issue with this free pattern for the occasion.  We challenge you to sew one up and donate it to a girl in need.

FREE Dollhouse Skirt pattern from Skirt Fixation.

The Dollhouse Skirt is an elastic waist skirt perfect for any doll loving girl.  The skirt is color blocked to resemble a dollhouse, and there are multiple window pockets for storing a doll and her treasures.  The door actually opens and latches closed with a button.  The windows are created from clear vinyl so it is just like a real dollhouse!  Think of how long this interactive skirt will keep her occupied!

FREE Dollhouse Skirt pattern from Skirt Fixation.

The Dollhouse Skirt can be made for any girl from 12 months to 10 years.  You choose the length, mini, midi or even maxi!  The Dollhouse includes clear helpful photo instructions for every step.  If you’ve never made a skirt before, don’t worry, if you can sew a straight line, you can make this skirt.  And even though it looks very intricate, we’re confident you can sew up the Dollhouse Skirt in a couple of hours like we did.

FREE Dollhouse Skirt pattern from Skirt Fixation.

You can get a free copy of the Dollhouse Skirt on Craftsy.  We’ve chosen Craftsy as the host for the Dollhouse Skirt, just as we did for our free Pegasus Skirt pattern for these reasons:

1: Craftsy allows us to get the skirt to you with no fees or charges, which keeps The Pegasus Skirt free! (It’s also free for you to sign up, if you aren’t already a member.)

2: Craftsy is a community of talented makers, and we want to be counted among them.

3: In the Craftsy community, makers are challenged to grow, learn and create greater and greater things, and that is at the heart of the Dollhouse Skirt.

FREE Dollhouse Skirt pattern from Skirt Fixation.

We really want you to try our FREE Dollhouse Skirt pattern, and we’d love to see what you make, so be sure to use the hashtag #dollhouseskirt on social media.  There are so many different fabric and color combinations that could be used to make the Dollhouse Skirt pattern.  We can’t wait to see your Dollhouse Skirt.  So hop over to Craftsy, pick up your free copy of the Dollhouse skirt, and start sewing one today (hopefully for a girl in need!)

FREE Dollhouse Skirt pattern from Skirt Fixation.

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10 FREE Reversible Skirt Tutorials {Skirting the Issue}

10 FREE reversible skirt tutorials

10 FREE reversible skirt tutorials

What’s better than one skirt?  One skirt that can be worn two ways!  Reversible skirts are so fun and a very, very sweet gift to give to a foster girl.  So we rounded up these 10 FREE tutorials that you can make for your child or donate to a good cause like Skirting The Issue.  Alright, here’s the 10 FREE reversible skirt tutorials.  And if you’d prefer a pattern, scroll down to the end for some reversible skirt pattern suggestions.  Keep in mind several of these tutorials are for women’s sizes which work wonderfully for older girls in foster care where the need for donations is greater.

10 FREE Reversible Skirt Tutorials:

Circle Skirt by You & Me

Paperbag Skirt by Petit a Petit & family for The Sewing Rabbit

Balloon Skirt by Zierstoff

Wrap skirt by Andrea DeHart for Makezine

Domesticated Skirt by Sew A Straight Line

Scalloped Hem by Bored & Crafty

Zippered Bali Skirt by So Sew Easy

Circle Wrap Skirt by Girl Inspired

Reversible Pencil Skirt

Pencil Skirt by Bumbling Panda

Petal Skirt by Pretty Prudent

Girl’s Reversible Skirt Patterns:

Oliver + S Hula Hoop Skirt

Oliver + S Swingset Skirt

Violette Field Threads Lavinia Skirt

Thanks for stopping by today and happy skirt sewing!

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Forest Friends Pouch Tutorial

Free tutorial to make Forest Animal Pouches from Skirt Fixation

Free tutorial to make Forest Animal Pouches from Skirt Fixation

Did you fall in love with those sweet little forest friends pouches like we did yesterday?  With the leftover scraps from the Forest Floor Fabrics blog tour, we created these cute animal pouches, and today we’re going to teach you how!

Forest Friends Pouch Tutorial

Supplies:

Forest Friends Pocket pattern from Violette Field Threads.

Fabric Scraps (our specific fabric information at end of post)

Interfacing  (I used Pellon SF-101)

4 inch zippers – I used these:  

Buttons, ribbon, fake flowers, embellishments

Instructions:

Before you begin sewing, cut out interfacing for the head pieces and iron them onto the wrong side of the fabric.  This will enable your pouches to be structured rather than floppy.

Make the pockets as instructed, not including sewing on the buttons and embellishments.

Free tutorial to make Forest Animal Pouches from Skirt Fixation

Then, sew a 3 inch zipper to one side of the face. Gently curve the zipper to match the curve of the face.

Free tutorial to make Forest Animal Pouches from Skirt Fixation

Sew the other side of the zipper to the other side of the face, carefully lining up the ends and curving the zipper along the face as before.

Now, sew on the button eyes and any other embellishments you desire.

Cut a short length of ribbon and pin it in a loop just behind the animal’s ears.  This will be the handle.

Free tutorial to make Forest Animal Pouches from Skirt Fixation

Next, fold the two halves wrong sides together, sandwiching the zipper in between, and topstitch around the whole pouch, beginning at one end of the zipper and ending at the other end.

Finally, sew on the nose buttons.

One additional note: we embedded pipe cleaners in the rabbit’s ears because they are long and could be floppy without the pipe cleaners.  Unless you want floppy ears, of course!

Here is a list of fabrics we used to make these Forest Friends pouches:

Art Gallery Forest Floor Wild Posy Flora: Deer Head, Raccoon Ear

Art Gallery Forest Floor Luna Rising Shadow: Fox Head, Bunny Ears

Art Gallery Forest Floor Timber Nightfall: Raccoon Head, Fox Face

Art Gallery Forest Floor Capped Dim: Raccoon Eye, Deer Ears

Art Gallery Forest Floor Maple Mill Fog: Fox Ears

Art Gallery Forest Floor Jersey Knit Laced Moss: Deer Face

Art Gallery Forest Floor Jersey Knit Flourish: Rabbit Head

Free tutorial to make Forest Animal Pouches from Skirt Fixation

Let us know if you use this tutorial, we’d love to see your Forest Friends pouch creations!

Affiliate links have been used in this post because after all our hard work of sewing, we like to relax with a little fabric shopping…and every penny helps!

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Birthday #3 {Project Sew It}

Knight Hoodie for Project Sew It

project+sew+it+grey

There’s something inspirational going on this year.  Celina of Petit a Petit and Family created Project Sew It.  You can read all about it here, but the basic premise is to sew one thing every month.  I’m putting my own twist on it by sewing one thing for each of my nieces and nephews for their birthdays this year.  It won’t end up being once per month, and sometimes it’ll be more than once per month, but it’s my goal!  I sew so much for my kids, that I want to share the sewing love.

For the third birthday of my nieces and nephews, I decided to sew another Knight Hoodie.  This particular nephew has officially entered those hard to sew for boy years!  An adoring aunt has to be careful about using cute-sy fabric and babyish patterns.  Since my son Thomas (who is a year older than this nephew) likes and wears his Knight Hoodie often, I thought it would be a safe choice.  I’ve also sewn a Knight Hoodie for another son, David, who is quite a bit younger, so I think the Knight Hoodie is a particularly good choice for any boy…and even a girl!

Knight Hoodie

I had the opportunity to try this Knight Hoodie on my nephew before giving it to him, which was really fortunate due to the armholes not being wide enough to layer another shirt underneath.  Kind of the whole point of a hoodie, right?

Knight Hoodie for Project Sew It

It looks like my nephew loves his new Knight Hoodie!  Apparently his family had recently attended a Medieval Festival and they are hooked on all things Medieval, so this Knight Hoodie was perfect timing!

I also wanted to share a quick tip on how to get pockets to line up across a zipper because it’s something I’ve struggled with often and spent quality time with my seam ripper over and over again.

How to line up a zipper to pockets.

To begin, sew on one side of the zipper to the garment.  Then use chalk or some other marking tool to mark the top and the bottom of the pockets on both sides of the zipper.

How to line up a zipper with pockets.

Put the other side of the zipper in place, carefully lining up the marks at the top and bottom of the zipper and sew in place.  Easy and a successful pocket match up the first time, every time!  Now if only I can remember to use my own tip the next time I install a zipper!

Thanks to my sister for the photos of her son in his Knight Hoodie.