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Cheater Threading for a Serger

How to thread your serger the cheater threading method from Skirt Fixation

Before we go on to the 2nd lesson in our Serger School series, we need an interlude about threading…cheater threading!  Everyone’s greatest fear with a new serger is threading it.  So before learning anything about how to sew with the serger, I’m going to teach you how to thread it…in under 3 minutes…the easy way.

Now of course this only works if your serger already has thread in it!  If not, don’t worry, we’re working on a video all about threading the Brother 1034D serger the “real” way.  So stay tuned.

Without further ado, try this for no-frustration cheater threading for your serger:


In the video, and in our studio, we use the Brother 1034d serger.

Brother 1034d Serger

 

We recommend these threads:

GREY Low Lint, High Tensile Strength Polyester Serger Thread

BLACK Low Lint, High Tensile Strength Polyester Serger Thread

WHITE Low Lint, High Tensile Strength Polyester Serger Thread

If your serger is still in the box, go here for Lesson 1.

Need thread storage solutions?  Try this post.

Subscribe to our channel on YouTube!   We post videos about sewing and serging.

How to thread your serger the cheater threading method from Skirt Fixation

Affiliate links are used in this post.  Thank you for supporting the production of these videos by clicking on our links.  We make a few pennies at no additional cost to you.  Thanks!

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DIY Pendant Banner (With a No Sew option!)

DIY pendant banner tutorial from Skirt Fixation with a NO SEW option!

DIY Pendant Banner tutorial from Skirt Fixation

Today I’ve got a fun easy to make (with even a NO SEW option!) DIY pendant banner.  Pendant banners are great for adding spice to any space.  For this DIY pendant banner made from fabric, I used all Indigo & Aster fabric by Bari J. for Art Gallery Fabrics.

DIY Pendant Banner tutorial from Skirt Fixation

First of all you need to choose your fabrics.  Using coordinating prints from a line of fabric is always a great idea because you are assured of keeping a cohesive look across the pendant banner.

DIY Pendant Banner tutorial from Skirt Fixation

Have fun picking out trims and embellishments to add flair to your pendant banner.  Using a variety of trims, but on the same fabrics helps tie the banner all together.  Or you could mix it up and use different trims on different pendants across the banner.

DIY Pendant Banner tutorial from Skirt Fixation

Next you need to cut out your pendants.  To use our exact same size pendant, you can use this FREE cut file which works for fabric, cardstock, vinyl, leather, and more.  If you have a cutting machine like the Cricut Maker, you can use our cut file and have the pendants cut out by machine!

DIY Pendant Banner tutorial from Skirt Fixation

We chose to fray stop the edges of each pendant with Dritz Fray Check.  In time, the edges of the fabric pendants could fray if they move around a lot.  Since we wanted to keep a clean edge look, we chose to fray stop the edges.

https://amzn.to/2IK6yhO

Now it’s time for the fun part!  Grab the trims and embellishments you chose, and start playing!  We used beads, rick rack trim, lace, pom poms, feather trim, and seam tape.  Have fun and embellish away!  Cut each trim to fit the width of the pendant, and use original tacky glue to adhere the trims to each pendant.

DIY Pendant Banner tutorial from Skirt Fixation

The final step is to attach all your embellished pendants together.  We chose to use crocheted trim for one pendant banner, and lace for the other.  Sew or glue (for the NO SEW option) each pendant evenly spaced across the length of lace, ribbon or trim you’re using.  We found 1 inch to be the perfect spacing for our pendant banner.  If you sew the pendants to the banner, use a zig zag stitch across both the top and bottom of the lace/ribbon, or trim to keep it from rolling up when the pendant banner is hung.

DIY Pendant Banner tutorial from Skirt Fixation

That’s it!  Hang up your pendant banner and enjoy!  Now we’ll show you some detail shots with examples of embellishments and trims we used with links to where you can get them for your pendant banner.

DIY Pendant Banner tutorial from Skirt Fixation

Left to right:

Indigo & Aster panel, feather trim, 3/4” Pom Fringe Trim Lime, Indigo & Aster panel, strung together with 1 1/2” Crochet Ribbon Red

DIY Pendant Banner tutorial from Skirt Fixation

Left to right:

Indigo & Aster panel, beaded trim, Indigo & Aster panel, Treasure Splendor Tang with Riley Blake 3/4” Regular Ric Rac Hot Pink trim, Indigo & Aster panel, strung together with 3 1/2” Janice Cotton Lace Trim Natural

DIY Pendant Banner tutorial from Skirt Fixation

Left to right:

Gran Opulence Citrus with 1 1/2” Crochet Trim Pink, Indigo & Aster panel

DIY Pendant Banner tutorial from Skirt Fixation

Foliage Escape Vert with 3/4” Pom Fringe Trim Fuchsia, Indigo & Aster panel, strung together with 1 1/2” Crochet Ribbon Red

DIY Pendant Banner tutorial from Skirt Fixation

Left to right:

Indigo & Aster panel, Gran Opulence Citrus with 1 1/2” Crochet Trim Pink, Indigo & Aster panel strung together with 3 1/2” Janice Cotton Lace Trim Natural

DIY Pendant Banner tutorial from Skirt Fixation

Left to right:

Indigo & Aster panel, feather trim, strung together with 1 1/2” Crochet Ribbon Red

DIY Pendant Banner tutorial from Skirt Fixation

Left to right:

Indigo & Aster panel, Gran Opulence Citrus with 1 1/2” Crochet Trim Pink, beaded trim, Indigo & Aster panel, Foliage Escape Vert with 3/4” Pom Fringe Trim Fuchsia, Indigo & Aster panel embellished with vintage floral lace ribbon, strung together with 1 1/2” Crochet Ribbon Red

Or how about this fun rosebud trim?

Or this fun burlap/lace trim to string the pendant banner together:

2'' Becky Jute Lace Trim Natural
2” Becky Jute Lace Trim Natural

Have fun, and let us know if you use our tutorial to make a DIY pendant banner!

DIY pendant banner tutorial from Skirt Fixation with a NO SEW option!

Affiliate links are used in this post to really great products we use and love.  If you click on one of our links, we might make a few pennies at no additional cost to you!  So thanks for helping support our sewing habit, er make that fabric business!

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Serger School – Lesson 1: Take the Serger Out of the Box!

Serger School with Skirt Fixation

Welcome to Serger School – Lesson 1: Take the Serger Out of the Box!

Serger School with Skirt Fixation

I’m delighted to share with you the 1st in a series of serger school videos I’ve been working on.  We heard a lot of people say it took them a long time to take their new serger out of the box, or thread it, or other scary things.  So I created this series of videos to help my daughters and I conquer our fears of the serger.  It’s really not scary at all, and hopefully this fun video will convince you to take the serger out of the box!

Serger School Video:

 

Serger Machine Recommendations:

Brother 1034d Serger

Recently we purchased a Brother 1034D serger.  It’s the only one we have experience with, although we’ve heard a lot of good things about other serger machines too.

Serger School Supplies:

First of all, you will need thread.  We recommend and have good experience with low lint, high tensile strength thread.  You can begin with 3 colors that will blend with almost any fabric:

GREY Low Lint, High Tensile Strength Polyester Serger Thread

BLACK Low Lint, High Tensile Strength Polyester Serger Thread

WHITE Low Lint, High Tensile Strength Polyester Serger Thread

Serger Thread Storage Solutions

ArtBin Super Satchel Cone Thread Tray

June Tailor Cone Thread Rack

Darice Cone Thread Organizer

Noble Notions The Sew Stack

Embroidex 60 spool Cone Thread Stand

For even more serger thread storage ideas, follow our Pinterest board:

https://www.pinterest.com/skirtfixation/serger-thread-storage-ideas/

 

Serger School Homework:

Assignment #1: Take the serger out of the box!!!

Assignment #2: Order thread

Assignment #3: Decide on a thread storage solution

Assignment #4: Identify each of the accessories that came with your serger

Assignment #5: Read the introduction pages in your handbook.  For the Brother 1034D handbook, it’s chapter 1.

Serger School FAQ’s:

What’s the difference between a serger and an overlocker?  Nothing!  A serger is what we call this machine in America, and in Europe and elsewhere, it’s referred to as an overlocker.

 If you just got a serger, why should I listen to you? We always encourage more research, but since we’re beginners at this machine too, we won’t be using technical terms and operating it like a professional!  Let’s learn together.  And also, we took our serger out of the box!

 

 

Affiliate links are used in this post.  Thank you for supporting the production of these videos by clicking on our links.  We make a few pennies at no additional cost to you.  Thanks!

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A-line Dress to Gathered Dress Tutorial

a-line to gathered dress tutorial from Skirt Fixation

PSA!!!  Today if you purchase $35 on fabric at Peekaboo Fabric Shop, you will get 1 free pattern of your choice with the code FREEDOM until 2/19.  Oh, the possibilities!!!

Last week I promised to share with you how to make an A-line Dress into a gathered dress with a waist seam.  This a-line to gathered dress tutorial will work for any a-line dress pattern, women or girl.  I am using the Eeny Meeny Miny Moe Dress/Bodysuit pattern from Peekaboo Pattern Shop.

a-line to gathered dress tutorial from Skirt Fixation

Decide where you want the waist/high waist seam to be.  For my daughter, I measured under the armpit down 2 inches.  I folded over the front of the dress pattern piece at this point, but you could also cut your pattern piece in 2.  A word about seam allowance.  Since I was using 1/2” seam allowance, after sewn back together, the seam ends up 1.5” down from her armpit.

a-line to gathered dress tutorial from Skirt Fixation

Then fold your fabric in 1/2 in preparation for cutting the pattern pieces.  Place the skirt part pattern piece away from the fold as wide as the original pattern piece.  For my daughter’s dress, the original pattern piece is 5 inches wide at the top of the skirt piece, so I placed the outer edge of the pattern piece 10 inches away from the fold as you can see in the picture above.

Cut out the skirt pattern piece.

a-line to gathered dress tutorial from Skirt Fixation

Fold the skirt part of the pattern piece up out of the way and cut out the bodice part of the dress.  Cut out the bodice part, remembering to cut 1/2” (or whatever your seam allowance is) below the bottom of the fold.

Sew gathering stitches across the top of the skirt part.  Do this by sewing 2 lines of basting stitches across the top of the skirt part 1/4” and 3/4” from the raw edge.  Pull the ends of the gathering threads and distribute the gathers until the width of the skirt part and the width of the top bodice are the same.

Pin these two pieces together, with the right sides together using a 1/2” seam allowance. Remove the basting stitches if they show.

Repeat the above steps for the back of the dress.  Continue assembling your dress as instructed in your pattern.  I used the Eeny Meeny Miny Moe Dress & Bodysuit pattern by Peekaboo Pattern Shop.

Baby Capsule Wardrobe created and sewn by Skirt Fixation

In the above photo she is wearing the aline dress.

a-line to gathered dress tutorial from Skirt Fixation

In the above photo she is wearing the gathered dress!

Affiliate links are used in this post to really good fabric and patterns!  If you use our links we might make a few extra pennies at no additional cost to you, so thank you!

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French Terry Comparison

French Terry Comparison by Skirt Fixation

Today I’m going to walk you through a french terry comparison of 2 different fabrics. For purposes of this comparison, I sewed 2 similar items (a hoodie for a boy) so they are comparable for you to observe. Some of the differences are slight, and some are quite noticeable.

French Terry Comparison by Skirt Fixation

The 2 french terry fabrics are a traditional french terry, and a baby french terry. I got both of them from Simply By Ti fabrics, and both in black so once again, color is similar for this comparison. As you will see, I did mix it up with some buffalo plaid appliqué creatures at the boys’ request. The buffalo plaid is also inside the kangaroo pocket and lines the hoodie.

I used triblend Black Baby French Terry fabric for the wolf hoodie, and regular french terry for the bear hoodie.

French Terry comparison – stats

French Terry Comparison by Skirt Fixation

Here’s a chart showing the basic numerical comparisons of the two french terry fabrics. All of this information is basically self explanatory, except perhaps the weight. The ounces per yard is listed, and shows how much one yard of fabric weighs. It makes the regular french terry thicker or more dense, much like sweatshirt fabric in consistency.

French Terry comparison – hand

French Terry Comparison by Skirt Fixation

In my opinion, the rayon content in the baby french terry is what makes it so different. The baby french terry is very, very soft, and has excellent drape. While it works for a hoodie like I sewed, it would also work very nicely for a skirt or swing dress. You can see the excellent drape of the older boy’s hoodie especially in the photo of the back of the hoodies.

French Terry comparison – laundry

French Terry Comparison by Skirt Fixation

I have been laundering both of these fabrics the same, cold wash and dried in the dryer. I forgot to measure for and percentage of shrinkage before and after laundering them the 1st time, but since then, neither of them have shrunk.

French Terry comparison – durability

French Terry Comparison by Skirt Fixation

Neither of these hoodies has begun to pill, as both of the fabrics are really good quality. However, my guess would be that the baby french terry would pill first. Also, it could potentially snag on something (like when boys climb trees!) as the weave seems to be a little bit looser than the regular french terry.

French Terry comparison – warmth

French Terry Comparison by Skirt Fixation

Both of these are very warm. My guess would be that the baby french terry would keep the wearer a little warmer in colder temperatures due to the polyester content. But the tighter weave of the regular french terry makes it very warm too!

French Terry comparison – lint/static

French Terry Comparison by Skirt Fixation

My boys haven’t complained about either of these categories, but I’m not sure how much they’d notice anyway! Just having the fabrics in my sewing room, the regular french terry seemed to collect a little more dust/lint than the baby french terry. If they were put to the test, my guess would be that the baby french terry might have more of an issue with static or cling, but that’s just a guess.

French Terry comparison – stretch and recovery

French Terry Comparison by Skirt Fixation

Both of these fabrics have similar stretch and recovery properties. This means that they will stretch to fit the body without getting stretched out. They both stretch vertically and horizontally, making them really nice for so many garments.

French Terry comparison – pattern suggestions

French Terry Comparison by Skirt Fixation

Regular French Terry would be awesome for

Halifax Hoodie view C (with the zipper)

Jasper Sweater and Dress

Knight Hoodie

Hudson Pants

Aster Cardigan

Grandpa Cardigan

Geneva Cardigan

Aspen Pullover

Hatteras Hoodie,

Parachute Pants

Ila Dress

Bimaa Hoodie (pattern used for the bear hoodie)

Wild Things Coat or Vest

Baby French Terry would be amazing for

Charleston Dress,

Halifax Hoodie (any other view)

Paro Cardigan

Finlayson Sweater (pattern used for the wolf hoodie)

Hampton Hoodie

Lane Raglan,

Runway Skirt

Seattle Skater Skirt

Renfrew Top

Tallinn Sweater,

Camden Raglan,

Eeny Meeny Miny Moe

Rosemary Raglan

Skip Along Skort

That’s it for today!  Leave a comment about french terry…what have you used it for?

Affiliate links are used in this post to really amazing products that we love and think you might like to try.  If you click on one of our links, we might make a few pennies at no extra cost to you.  Thanks!

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Modifying a dress to a peplum top

Modified dress to peplum by Skirt Fixation

Today we’re over at CaliFabrics sharing all about our surprising love for this Earth Floral London Calling cotton lawn fabric.  Go check it out!

Modified dress to peplum by Skirt Fixation

But we wanted to share a little bit about how we modified the Apple Picking Dress pattern by Oliver+S into a peplum, just like we did last time we made this pattern for Annie.  That one turned out to be such a favorite of hers that when she finally outgrew it, I promised to make her another one.

Modified dress to peplum by Skirt Fixation

Here’s the short and easy tutorial that will actually work for any drop waist dress, or you could easily do this with any dress with a waistband seam.

Measure from neck to waist, and shorten the bodice front and back pieces accordingly.  You will also need to shorten any placket pieces by the same amount.

Modified dress to peplum by Skirt Fixation

Then for the Apple Picking pattern, we just used the 1st ruffle only instead of both ruffles.  Ta-da!  Fast, easy, on trend, and suuuuuper cute!

Modified dress to peplum by Skirt Fixation

Of course, since there was leftover fabric scraps, I had to sew up a matching bubble skirt for the baby!    And the scraps of the scraps, I sewed a bonnet and the heart on Baby’s shirt.

Modified dress to peplum by Skirt Fixation

In fact, this cute floral fabric inspired a whole capsule wardrobe for baby, which I’ll be telling you more about very soon!

That’s it for today…short and sweet, just like the peplum!  Go check out our full post with lots more photos of these two over at CaliFabrics.

 

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I Made A Puffer Jacket!!!

How to DIY a puffer jacket - tutorial from Skirt Fixation

In celebration of today’s EPIC coat making success, I’m giving away a $50 gift card to Mood Fabrics!  For a chance to win, visit me on Instagram.

How to DIY a puffer jacket - tutorial from Skirt Fixation

For a very, very long time I have wanted a puffer jacket!  But because I’m 6’ tall, until very recently, one that fit was out of the question even though puffer jackets are everywhere!  Then my (also very tall) sister sent me a photo of her wearing a puffer jacket she had purchased from a specialty tall shop.  I fell in love with it, and almost hit the buy it now button on their online shop.  Then I got to thinking…and decided to sew one for myself.  But as I looked for online tutorials or tips or anything, I couldn’t find ANY!  Am I the only person who has tried this?  There are a few places you can buy pre-quilted fabric, but now I was on a mission to sew my own.

How to DIY a puffer jacket - tutorial from Skirt Fixation

After searching for nylon fabric (what puffer jackets are made from) I got several swatches from Mood Fabrics, and finally settled on Burgundy Nylon Ripstop fabric for the outside, and Maroon/Gray Tartan Plaid flannel fabric for the inside.

You can read all about how to make your own puffer jacket over on the Mood Fabrics blog today!  I’m guest posting there all about everything I learned while making this jacket for myself.

How to DIY a puffer jacket - tutorial from Skirt Fixation

It may not surprise you to learn the pattern I used as the starting point for my puffer jacket was the Halifax Hoodie by Hey June Patterns. (affiliate link)  To read about the modifications I made to the pattern, and see some (pre snow storm) photos, head over to the Hey June Handmade blog today!

How to DIY a puffer jacket - tutorial from Skirt Fixation

I think the only details I didn’t include in those two posts is my zipper source, and the leather tassel I created at the last minute!  The zipper is a 36” thin nylon-coil separating formal wear zipper in color #527 – Bordeaux.  It was the only zipper I could find that was long enough.   It came from Zipperstop.  And since it wasn’t really intended for outerwear, I decided to add the leather tassel to try to spare the zipper and okay, just for looks!  It was so simple to make, I just cut long strips of gray leather, looped them around the bottom ring of the clip on hardware, and tied another strip of leather at the top to keep them all secure.  It turned out to be too wide to clip through the actual zipper pull itself, so I used a metal ring to go connect them.

Here’s a picture of my inspiration puffer jacket…the one my sister owns!  How did I do?

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Knit Skirt to T-Shirt Refashion

Knit skirt to t-shrt refashion tutorial by Skirt Fixation

Today’s quick and easy tutorial walks you through the steps of turning that skirt you no longer wear into a t-shirt you’ll never stop wearing!  The best part?  No hemming!  Let’s make that skirt to t-shirt happen:

Updated Union St. Tee pattern review

Here is the knit maxi skirt I started with.  It’s a cotton/modal/spandex knit blend with some fun stripes at the bottom.  It has a huge elasticated waistband, I think intended to be one of those convertible dress/skirt things.  If you’re like me, those garments always end up being WAAAAAY too narrow in the hips, and I don’t even have that wide of hips!

Knit Skirt to T-shirt Refashion Step 1:

Knit skirt to t-shrt refashion tutorial by Skirt Fixation

First thing I recommend is laying out your pattern pieces over the skirt before making any cuts.  This is so you don’t have any nasty surprises later when you end up with only enough fabric left for 1 sleeve or something!  Ask me how I know…  I’m using the Union St. Tee pattern by Hey June Handmade.  It’s my favorite, read my full review here.

Knit Skirt to T-shirt Refashion Step 2:

Knit skirt to t-shrt refashion tutorial by Skirt Fixation

Alright, now that you have a plan, grab those scissors and get busy!  I cut the skirt up one side seam and cut off that waistband so things would lay flat.

Knit Skirt to T-shirt Refashion Step 3:

Knit skirt to t-shrt refashion tutorial by Skirt Fixation

Next, fold the skirt into the middle, and try to line up the fabric.  This was easy for me due to the stripes!  Line up the bottom of the pattern piece below the hem of the skirt by whatever amount is the seam allowance on the pattern.  For me the pattern piece was 1″ below the skirt in the center.

Knit Skirt to T-shirt Refashion Step 4:

Knit skirt to t-shrt refashion tutorial by Skirt Fixation

Okay, grab those scissors and get busy!  I cut out the front and back.  Next I folded the skirt all the way in 1/2 so I didn’t have a seam down the top of my sleeves, and cut the sleeves.  The neckband did end up with a seam at the center back (which a v-neck usually doesn’t have) but not a big deal!

Knit Skirt to T-shirt Refashion Step 5:

Sew that t-shirt together and put it on!  Once again, I used the Union St. Tee pattern and instructions from Hey June Patterns.  Happy sewing and t-shirt wearing!

Updated Union St. Tee pattern review

By now you probably know that the link to Hey June Patterns is an affiliate link.  That’s because it’s a really awesome pattern and we want you to succeed in your sewing ventures, not get frustrated or fail!  Because it’s an affiliate link, if you click on it, we might make a few pennies at no extra cost to you.  So thanks!

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Contrast Hood Binding Tutorial

Today we’ve got a quick and easy tutorial for you on how to make a contrast hood binding.  This is a fun way to make the inside of the hood pop!  You can use plain fabric for the outside and a pop of print for the inside, or print for the outside and a coordinating pop of solid color for the contrast hood binding and inside.  Or print for both.  Or plain for both!  Let’s get started.

Contrast Hood Binding tutorial from Skirt Fixation

First you need to cut 2 of each hood piece.  (If your hood pattern is lined like the one I used, the Rosemary Raglan affiliate link, just cut and sew as instructed.)  When both your outer and inner hoods are assembled, here’s the fast and easy way to create that contrast hood binding.

Contrast Hood Binding tutorial from Skirt Fixation

Contrast Hood Binding Step 1:

Cut 1 inch off the outer hood along the front edge.  (Most hoods are generously sized, and they will still cover the head adequately after doing this.  But if you are concerned about the size of the hood, you can ADD 1 inch to the front edge of the inner hood as you are cutting it out.

Contrast Hood Binding tutorial from Skirt Fixation

Contrast Hood Binding Step 2:

Place the inner hood over the outer hood, right sides together.  Line up the front edges, even though the hoods are now different sizes.

 

Contrast Hood Binding tutorial from Skirt FixationContrast Hood Binding Step 3:

Sew the front edges together.

Contrast Hood Binding tutorial from Skirt Fixation

Contrast Hood Binding Step 4:

Turn the hood right sides out, and roll the inner hood out along the front edge.  See, instant contrast hood binding.

Contrast Hood Binding tutorial from Skirt Fixation

Contrast Hood Binding Step 5:

To keep the inner fabric from rolling back to the inside, topstitch along the outer hood fabric, just inside the seam line.

Now you can create a contrast hood binding on all your hoodies!  We’d love to see your completed garment if you use our tutorial…leave us a comment below, or send us an email: skirtfixation@gmail.com

To see the fabric sources and the matching hoodie I sewed for myself, head over to CaliFabrics!

Contrast Hood Binding tutorial from Skirt Fixation

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DIY Clothing Labels

DIY Clothing Labels tutorial by Skirt Fixation

It’s time for another Handmade Baby post!  If you sew baby clothes, like me, you will soon discover how fast that little one can grow!  And growing means new clothes.  Plus the old clothes need to be dealt with too!  With all these handmades, and the speed at which the transitions happen, it’s easy to loose track of what size each article of clothing is, even if you’re doing a capsule wardrobe, and have minimized the amount.  Enter DIY clothing labels.

DIY Clothing Labels tutorial by Skirt Fixation

To make 60 DIY clothing labels, cut a piece of fabric 20.5” x 9.25”  Divide this into 1.5” x 2” squares, using a pencil or fabric marking pen.  (We like Mark-B-Gone pens.) affiliate link  Allegra also used this pen to write the numbers on before she began embroidering.

Use Fray Stop (affiliate link) on the edges of the big square.  If you don’t do this little step, you’ll be fighting fraying edges the whole time you are embroidering!

Embroider 1/2 of the tag.  We did the lower half, but you can also do the top half which makes it easer to sew into a seam.  Stay away from the edges of each tag.

You can also write the sizes on the labels with a permanent marker if you don’t know how to embroider or have an in house embroiderer, like we do.  Thanks Allegra!

DIY Clothing Labels tutorial by Skirt Fixation

Cut the rectangles apart.

DIY Clothing Labels tutorial by Skirt Fixation

Fold each rectangle in 1/2 with the right sides touching and sew the sides with a 1/4” or less seam allowance.

DIY Clothing Labels tutorial by Skirt Fixation

Turn the tags right side out.  Push out the corners out so the tag is square.

DIY Clothing Labels tutorial by Skirt Fixation

Fold over the raw edge to the underside, and topstitch across it onto the fabric.

DIY Clothing Labels tutorial by Skirt Fixation

Pivot at the corners and continue top stitching the tag into the garment.

DIY Clothing Labels tutorial by Skirt Fixation

And there you have it!  Tiny baby DIY clothing labels.  Let us know what you do with the clothes your children outgrow…we need suggestions!

DIY Clothing Labels tutorial by Skirt Fixation