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View B Ruched Tankini Sew Along

Ruched tankini sew along

Today we’re going to sew the ruched tankini front panel on View B of the Grace Tankini.  This is the part that gets the most questions, so we thought a photo tutorial would be helpful.  It’s worth it to make the ruched panel on View B…it’s many people’s favorite part about this view!

Ruched tankini sew along

Step 1:

Cut out the front panel.  As suggested in the Grace Tankini pattern, do not cut it out on the fold, but open up your fabric, cut 1/2 of the piece, flip the pattern piece over and cut the other half.

Ruched tankini sew along

Step 2:

After sewing the gathering stitches on the sides of the ruched front panel, gather it.  It is helpful to lay out your side piece to see how far to gather the front panel.  Start the gathers at the dot, below the notch where the top of the side panel goes.

As stated in the pattern, you can concentrate the ruching wherever you want to!  More ruching=minimization of that area.  Try to keep the gathers even from side to side so they don’t slant diagonally across your body.  End the gathers 1/5” above the bottom of the front panel so it doesn’t sag down across the bottom.  (Apologies for the blurriness of this photo.  It’s the only one I ended up with!)

You can see how I’ve pinned down my side piece to keep it from moving as I gathered the front panel.  When you are finished gathering, the bottom of the front and side will line up.  The top of the side piece will be at the notch of the front panel.

Ruched tankini sew along

Step 3:

Once the front panel is the same length as the side panel (from the notch to the hem,) pin them right sides together.  Gently curve the shape of the front panel and the side piece to match up.

Ruched tankini sew along

Step 4:

Sew the front panel and side piece together.  We’ve found it more helpful to have the ruched front panel down against the feed dogs to help pull the gathers along evenly.

There you have it!  Continue with the instructions to make the rest of the Grace Tankini.

Ruched tankini sew along

Grab your copy of the Grace Tankini here.

Fabric used in this tutorial is from CaliFabrics.

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Sewing the Circle Cut Out in the Grace Tankini

How to sew the circle cut out in the back of your Grace Tankini pattern.

We’ve got a tutorial for you about sewing a circle cut out in the back of the Grace Tankini for View A.  This part is not hard at all and adds such fun to the back!

How to sew the circle cut out in the back of your Grace Tankini pattern.

You could actually use the back pattern piece to add a circle cut out to the back of View B also.  Or use a CD and place it in the center back (between the shoulder blades) of your favorite swimsuit pattern, and use this tutorial to add a circle cut out to the back of your swimsuit!  Once you have cut out the pattern pieces of both your main fabric and your lining or shelf bra, follow this photo tutorial.

How to sew the circle cut out in the back of your Grace Tankini pattern.

Step 1:

Line up the two circles and pin.  The right side of your main fabric will be facing up, and the wrong side of your shelf bra or lining will be facing up.  In other words, right sides together!

How to sew the circle cut out in the back of your Grace Tankini pattern.

Step 2:

Carefully sew around the edges of the circle, using a 1/2” seam allowance.  Stop and adjust the fabric as needed.  It’s easiest if you put your needle down in the fabric and adjust the layers.  Alternately, you can baste, check it, and then sew.  If your fabric is thin and doesn’t have good stability, you might try marking the circle onto the back of the fabric and sewing this step before cutting out the fabric from in the middle.  This will ensure your circle doesn’t end up stretched out of shape.

How to sew the circle cut out in the back of your Grace Tankini pattern.

Step 3:

Snip around the circle, up to but NOT through your line of stitches you just sewed.  This will allow the circle to lay flat.  I’ve found using just the tip of a sharp scissors to be the key here.

How to sew the circle cut out in the back of your Grace Tankini pattern.

Here’s a close up so you can tell how close to go to the stitched circle.

How to sew the circle cut out in the back of your Grace Tankini pattern.

Step 4:

Pull your lining or shelf bra through the hole so it is now on the wrong side of the swimsuit back where it belongs.  Carefully press around the circle to get it to lay flat.

How to sew the circle cut out in the back of your Grace Tankini pattern.

Step 5:

Sew around the circle again with a 1/4” – 3/8” seam allowance.  As you sew, you want to gently roll the lining/shelf bra to the underside so it doesn’t show on the right side when you are finished.

How to sew the circle cut out in the back of your Grace Tankini pattern.

And there you have it!  In the above photo you can see the inside and outside of the circle cut out.  Your circle cut out in the back of a swimsuit is completely finished!  Bring on the sun…

How to sew the circle cut out in the back of your Grace Tankini pattern.

 

Grab your copy of the Grace Tankini here.

Fabric used in this tutorial is from CaliFabrics.

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Modifying the Grace Tankini for Removable Bra Cups

Removable bra cups tutorial from Skirt Fixation

Today we’ve got a special tutorial for you on how to modify the Grace Tankini pattern to allow for removable bra cups.  This is useful for breast cancer survivors who may have mastectomy prosthesis to insert into different bras or swimwear, or to allow for any other inserts.

Grab your copy of the Grace Tankini here.

Let’s get started:

Removable Bra Cups Tutorial

Removable bra cups tutorial from Skirt Fixation

Cut out 2 shelf bra fronts from lining fabric.  They are pictured above at the top right.

Removable bra cups tutorial from Skirt Fixation

Cut the straps off of one of them.  You will do this below the center of the armhole, and across to the neckline, leaving a portion of the neckline intact so you can catch it in the elastic later.

Removable bra cups tutorial from Skirt Fixation

Serge/finish top slanted edges you just cut so they hold up better when inserting and removing bra cups.

Removable bra cups tutorial from Skirt Fixation

 

Sew together the two shelf bra front pieces with a straight stitch down the center, from the neckline center to the bottom center.  See the dotted line in the photo above.  This is to help keep the bra cups in place so they don’t migrate around during wear.

Removable bra cups tutorial from Skirt Fixation

Treat the 2 front layers as 1 as you are sewing the suit following the instructions.

Removable bra cups tutorial from Skirt Fixation

When you assemble the shelf bra into the Grace Tankini, you want the side with the cut off shoulder straps touching your body.  There will be an opening where you cut off the shoulder straps to insert bra cups or mastectomy prosthesis.

Removable bra cups tutorial from Skirt Fixation

From the outside, the suit looks exactly the same!  Above you might notice the other modification made to the Grace Tankini by making it into a cropped two-piece suit!

Two Piece Grace TankiniNow she can transfer her removable bra cups from suit to suit!

This tutorial can be used with any swimsuit pattern that has a shelf bra.  Of course we recommend the Grace Tankini!

Special thanks to tester Tee Bee for photographing this tutorial.

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Bloom & Grow Skirt – Free Girl’s Skirt Pattern!

Free girl's Bloom & Grow skirt pattern from Skirt Fixation

Today we’re excited to release a free girl’s skirt pattern, the Bloom & Grow Skirt.  As in the past few years in July, we’re excited to join in with Simple Simon and Co. for the Skirting The Issue charity sewing event!  We’re releasing another free girl’s skirt pattern, the Bloom & Grow skirt.Free girl's Bloom & Grow skirt pattern from Skirt Fixation

If you want to go straight to download the skirt, click here!

We designed the Bloom & Grow skirt with the growing girl in mind.  This skirt is designed for use with double border print fabrics.  Often, these fabrics feature a floral print.  The extra fullness of this skirt makes it super twirly and the elastic waist is perfect for any growing girl.

Annie is wearing a petticoat underneath this Bloom & Grow skirt to show the fullness!  Because this skirt is not cut across the fabric from selvedge to selvedge like traditional skirts, but down the length of the yardage, it is a very full skirt!

The fabric used for this skirt is Sage Prickly Pear Indigo by Art Gallery Fabrics.  It is a double border print fabric which means the pattern is printed along both sides or selvedges, down the length of the fabric.

Another beautiful double border print fabric you could also use is Garden Walk fabric by Art Gallery Fabrics.

We also designed some floral radiograph double print border fabric, and think it’d be smashing on the Bloom & Grow Skirt!

We’d love it if you use this free girl’s skirt pattern to sew up some skirts for Skirting The Issue.  Read all about Skirting The Issue here.  And then link up your skirts for girls in foster care.

You can also check out our other very popular free girl’s skirt patterns:FREE Dollhouse Skirt pattern from Skirt Fixation.

The Dollhouse Skirt

The Pegasus Skirt, a free pattern from Skirt Fixation

The Pegasus Skirt

So now you can go grab our newest free girl’s skirt pattern: The Bloom & Grow Skirt!

A few affiliate links are used in this post to really beautiful fabric.  If you click on our links, we might make a few pennies…thanks!

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Swimwear Notions & 2 Ways to Sew Elastic into Swimwear

Adding elastic and boning to swimwear, a photo tutorial by Skirt Fixation

This post is all about the notions you need when sewing swimwear.  Grab your copy of the Grace Tankini here.

First let’s talk about elastic.


You want to be sure to use elastic specifically made for swimwear when sewing the Grace Tankini.  Cotton swimwear elastic is stretchier than other elastic, and holds up better to the ravages of chlorine water.  The Grace Tankini pattern uses 1/4″ swimwear elastic on the neckline, armholes, and leg holes.  You can buy it at your local sewing shop, and online.  You can even buy it by the roll on Amazon if you plan to sew a lot of elastic!

The other place elastic is used in the Grace Tankini is on the shelf bra.  Since this width is a little harder to find, you can either use regular 3/4″ elastic, or buy it by the roll on Amazon.

There are 2 ways to sew elastic into swimwear, and we’ve created a video tutorial to show you both ways.  Try them both, and use your favorite method.

The other notion you might use when sewing swimwear is boning.  Boning is useful for giving a shelf bra extra support on the sides.  When there is wrinkling in the bust area on the sides of a garment, that area could benefit from boning.

Prym Dritz Featherlite Twill Boning White

You can buy boning by the package or by the yard at your local sewing store.  Boning often has a cloth cover over a plastic or nylon insert.  Here is how we suggest adding boning to the Grace Tankini:


Adding boning to swimwear, a photo tutorial by Skirt Fixation

Zig zag your side seam allowances to the back of the shelf bra.  By doing this, you create a channel to insert the boning.  Continue with the pattern until you have inserted the underbust elastic.

Adding boning to swimwear, a photo tutorial by Skirt Fixation

If your boning has a cover, pull it back.  Cut your boning to match the length of the channel you created, minus about 1/2″ at the top of the side seam where you will be installing your armhole elastic.

Adding boning to swimwear, a photo tutorial by Skirt Fixation

Slide the boning into the channel.  That’s it!  Finish constructing your Grace Tankini, and forget worrying about having enough support!

Some people consider the notions to be the trickiest part of sewing swimwear, but we’ve made it easy for you with these swimwear notions tutorials.

Grab your copy of the Grace Tankini here.

Some affiliate links are used in this post to supplies we really love and use often.  If you click on one of our affiliate links, we might make a few pennies at no extra cost to you.  Thank you!

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How to Add Bra Cups to a Swimsuit

How to add bra cups to a swimsuit - a video tutorial from Skirt Fixation

Today’s post is all about bra cups.  Grab your copy of the Grace Tankini here.

The Grace Tankini has a shelf bra in both views.  Adding bra cups to the shelf bra gives more stability and support as well as modesty when wet.  First let’s talk about bra cups.

How to add bra cups to a swimsuit - a video tutorial from Skirt Fixation

Bra cups for swimwear come in all different types!  There are several different shapes including inverted u-shape, oval or teardrop.  There are as many different cup sizes as there are for regular bras, but A-DD are the most common.  Swimwear bra cups can be found in a molded poly foam or gel filled, both with a knit covering.  Also, bra cups can be found in white, black, or nude.  Bra cups with enhancing (push up) features can also be purchased.

In choosing what bra cups to use, you should look for a shape and size that matches your bust size and swim fabric.  Be sure the bra cups you purchase include the words “for swimwear” so you can be sure they will not retain water or be damaged by chlorine.

Where to Source Bra Cups for Swimwear

You can purchase bra cups online or in your local sewing store.  As of this post, bra cups cost between $6 and $15.  Some online sources include:

How to add bra cups to a swimsuit - a video tutorial from Skirt Fixation

JoAnn Fabrics Dritz Molded Foam Bra Cups

Amazon

Sew Sassy

Another tried and true method of sourcing bra cups for swimwear is to harvest them from an old or thrift store swimsuit!  They are much cheaper, and in season you can often buy a suit from the thrift store for a dollar or two.  If you source your bra cups from a swimsuit, you can be assured they are intended for swimwear and will hold up to chlorine and not retain water.

How to Add Bra Cups to a Swimsuit

Sewing bra cups in to the Grace Tankini (or any shelf bra swimsuit) is easy and rewarding.  Watch our video below to watch us sew bra cups into the Grace Tankini and listen for all our little tips along the way!

If you’re looking for more support than a shelf bra with sewn in bra cups offers, try this tutorial from Cashmerette.

Also, watch for a tutorial on how to make your bra cups removable, which is useful if you’ve purchased special/expensive inserts (i.e. mastectomy prosthesis) you want to use in several different suits.

Leave us your thoughts about bra cups in the comments below.

Grab your copy of the Grace Tankini here.

Affiliate links are used in this post.  If you click one of our affiliate links, we may make a few pennies at no extra cost to you.  We only like to really great produce we love and recommend!

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Sewing With Power Mesh

How to add power mesh to swimwear - a tutorial from Skirt Fixation

Swimwear sewing is doable for the home sewist, and every tip and tutorial helps you achieve a more professional look.  Today we’re talking about power mesh.  Grab your copy of the Grace Tankini here.

How to add power mesh to swimwear - a tutorial from Skirt Fixation

Power mesh is a lightweight, sheer fabric used to add extra compression or support to swimwear.  The best power mesh fabric to use for swimwear is made from a nylon spandex blend, and has a 4 way stretch.  The amount of stretch varies, so you should look for power mesh with similar stretch properties to your main swim fabric and lining.

Speaking of lining, the most common application of power mesh is to add it to the wrong side of your lining.  Stay tuned for the tutorial below on just how to do that.  But power mesh can also be used in place of the lining altogether.

Why to Use Power Mesh:

Reasons you might want to add power mesh to your swimwear are: extra compression power, extend the life of your suit, and modesty if your main fabric is thin.  Keep in mind that the extra compression power may require you to go up a size when making your swimwear.  This is both because power mesh often has less stretch than regular swim fabric, and also because every layer of fabric you add to your suit can mean less stretch overall.

Power mesh is also often used as the briefs in men/boys swim trunks.   It comes in many different colors and even a few prints.  You should wash and dry your power mesh in the same way you plan to launder your finished suit.  For us that means a cold water wash and a line dry.

Power mesh usually costs between $3 and $15 per yard.  We’ve linked to some sources we recommend for power mesh below:
Power Mesh White Fabric  
from Fabric.com
Performance Fabric Power Mesh Tango Red   
from JoAnn Fabrics

Power Mesh from Amazon

Power Mesh from Peekaboo Pattern Shop

The Fabric Fairy 

Cali Fabrics

Mood Fabrics

Online Fabric Store has 16 different colors of power mesh

Stylish Fabrics

How to Use Power Mesh:

Now here’s a tutorial on how to add power mesh to your swimwear.  In this tutorial, the power mesh is nude colored, the lining is white, and the main swim fabric is red and white striped.

How to add power mesh to swimwear - a tutorial from Skirt Fixation

Step 1:
Just like all swim wear fabric and lining, power mesh is easer to cut flat instead of on the fold. Also, we find it easier to get a more accurate cut when using a rotary cutter rather than a scissors. When you have your power mesh cut out, pin it to the wrong side of your lining fabric. (If your lining doesn’t have a right or wrong side, just choose one!)

How to add power mesh to swimwear - a tutorial from Skirt Fixation

Step 2:
Baste the power mesh to the lining fabric inside the seam allowance (closer to the raw edges) around all sides of the pattern piece.

How to add power mesh to swimwear - a tutorial from Skirt Fixation

Here you can see the power mesh is now basted to the lining fabric.  Sometimes the basting causes the lining to curl up a little around the edges.  This is no biggie, and it will stop once you remove your basting stitches.

How to add power mesh to swimwear - a tutorial from Skirt Fixation

Above you can see the right side of the fabric now has a line of basting stitches close to the edge.

How to add power mesh to swimwear - a tutorial from Skirt Fixation

Step 3:
Pin your lining pattern pieces together as according to the pattern instructions, keeping in mind the power mesh is on the wrong side of the lining fabric.  Remember to use ballpoint pins so you don’t snag your fabric when sewing swimwear.

Step 4:
Sew your lining pieces together with a stretch stitch. You can see how this line of sewing is outside the 1st basted line of thread. After this step, remove your basting stitches if desired.

How to add power mesh to swimwear - a tutorial from Skirt Fixation

Step 5:
Finally, sew the lining to the main fabric as instructed. You can see the power mesh is sandwiched between the main fabric and the lining.

There you have it: how and why to use power mesh in your swimwear sewing.  Leave us your thoughts about power mesh below!

Grab your copy of the Grace Tankini here.

Affiliate links are used in this post.  If you click one of our affiliate links, we may make a few pennies at no extra cost to you.  We only like to really great produce we love and recommend!

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3 Swaddle Blanket Tutorials

3 swaddle blanket tutorials by Skirt Fixation

Today as part of our Handmade Baby series we’ve got 3 tutorials for you on how to make your own swaddle blankets.  Each way is simple, fast, uses a different fabric, and ends up with a perfect sized blanket.  Let’s get started.

Flannel swaddle blanket tutorial:

Flannel swaddle blanket tutorial

Most flannel fabric comes in widths of 42-45 inches.  This makes your job really easy.  You need 2 yards of flannel, and you will get 3 swaddling blankets from this yardage.

flannel swaddle blanket tutorial from Skirt Fixation

Cut your 2 yard section into 3 equal pieces.  Depending on shrinkage, your pieces and finished flannel blanket will be 42-45” wide by 22-24” long.

flannel swaddle blanket tutorial from Skirt Fixation

Use your scissors to curve the top and bottom edges of each piece.  Zigzag or serge across the top and bottom edges of your flannel blankets.  (The side edges are selvedge edges, so you don’t need to finish them unless you want to!)

flannel swaddle blanket tutorial from Skirt Fixation

Tada!  You have created 3 soft and cuddly flannel swaddle blankets in no time at all!  We found this flannel at Raspberry Creek Fabrics.

Gauze swaddle blanket tutorial:

Gauze swaddle blanket tutorial from Skirt Fixation

Gauze comes in a wide variety of widths.  If your gauze is 54” wide like ours from Cali Fabrics, use this tutorial.  If it is narrower or has a print that would end up sideways, use the flannel swaddle blanket tutorial above.  From each yard of gauze, you will get 2 gauze swaddle blankets.Gauze swaddle blanket tutorial from Skirt FixationFor each yard of fabric, cut your fabric in 1/2 width wise.  Your pieces and finished gauze blanket will be 36 x 27 inches.  Zigzag or serge the edges of the gauze.

Gauze swaddle blanket tutorial from Skirt Fixation

There you have it, beautifully soft and drapey gauze swaddle blankets.  This substrate is perfect for summer months when you want to swaddle without extra warmth.

Knit swaddle blanket tutorial:

Knit swaddle blanket tutorial by Skirt Fixation

Sometimes knit fabric has a tendency to curl on the edges, so this knit swaddle blanket tutorial helps stop that issue.

Knit swaddle blanket tutorial by Skirt Fixation

Most knit fabric comes in widths of 58-60 inches.  Cut out 37 x 31 inch rectangles from your fabric.  Your finished knit swaddle blanket will be 36 x 30 inches.

Knit swaddle blanket tutorial by Skirt Fixation

Fold over 1/2 inch along one edge and zigzag it down in place.

Knit swaddle blanket tutorial by Skirt Fixation

As you near the corner, fold in 1/2 inch before you reach it.

Knit swaddle blanket tutorial by Skirt Fixation

Then fold over 1/2 inch along the side you are sewing, enclosing the other fold inside.

Knit swaddle blanket tutorial by Skirt Fixation

When you get to the corner, put your needle down, pick up the presser foot and pivot your fabric.  Continue sewing a zigzag stitch along the next side.

Knit swaddle blanket tutorial by Skirt Fixation

Knit swaddle blankets are perfect for swaddling a baby tightly and they stay swaddled too!

3 swaddle blanket tutorials by Skirt Fixation

I love each of these different kinds of swaddle blankets and use them all!  Which is your favorite type of swaddle blanket?

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DIY Felt Breakfast Food

Free felt breakfast food tutorial by Skirt Fixation for Sew Mama Sew

Today we’re “bringing home” this felt breakfast food post Allegra posted 2 years ago over at Sew Mama Sew.  Her siblings still love to play with this darling, handmade felt breakfast food!

Hi!  I’m Allegra, and I blog over at Skirt Fixation with my mom and sisters. I love embroidery, and combining that with another passion of mine; food, I have fun creating felt food! Felt food is a fun and educational toy that younger children love to touch. My little siblings’ personal favorite out of all of the items that I have made is the felt teabags. I stuff them with real aromatic herbs, and little kids adore smelling them over and over!

Free felt breakfast food tutorial by Skirt Fixation for Sew Mama Sew

Today I have a tutorial for an easy felt breakfast food set including an egg, bacon, pancake and teabag!

FELT EGGS:

Free felt breakfast food tutorial by Skirt Fixation for Sew Mama SewYou will need:

White felt (I use scraps because the eggs aren’t very large)

Yellow felt (I use very small scraps)

White and Yellow embroidery floss.

Very small amount of stuffing.

Free felt breakfast food tutorial by Skirt Fixation for Sew Mama Sew Pin oval egg pattern onto white felt. Cut out two ovals.  Pin egg yolk pattern onto yellow felt. Cut out one.

Free felt breakfast food tutorial by Skirt Fixation for Sew Mama Sew

Place egg yolk on one of the white ovals.  Pin if needed.  With two strands of yellow embroidery floss, begin to stitch the yolk onto one of the ovals. Bring the thread up through the bottom, and then put it through a small distance away.  When the yolk is ¾ of the way sewn down, pause and stuff it with a small amount of stuffing.

Free felt breakfast food tutorial by Skirt Fixation for Sew Mama SewFinish stitching the yolk down.

Free felt breakfast food tutorial by Skirt Fixation for Sew Mama SewBegin to stitch the two white ovals together. To do Blanket Stitch, bring your needle down through the two layers. Pull thread through until just a small loop remains. Put your needle through the loop and pull tight. There are quite a few good tutorials if you type in ‘blanket stitch’ in your preferred search engine.

Stuff the egg with a tiny amount of stuffing if desired.  Finish stitching the egg together.  Repeat to make as many cute little eggs as needed!

 FELT BACON:

Free felt breakfast food tutorial by Skirt Fixation for Sew Mama SewYou will need:

Dark red felt (If you have good-sized scraps, you can use them)

Pink felt (you can use very small scraps)

Pink embroidery floss.

Free felt breakfast food tutorial by Skirt Fixation for Sew Mama Sew

Pin bacon pattern piece pattern to red felt. Cut out one piece.  Out of the pink felt, cut two strips the approximate length of the bacon. These can be rather raggedy as they represent the bacon fat!

Free felt breakfast food tutorial by Skirt Fixation for Sew Mama Sew

Using a regular up-and-down stitch, sew the pink pieces of felt onto the red piece, positioning them so that there is a small space between them. Note: the red felt that I used is wool felt, and so thick that I only poked the needle partway into it, so that the pink stitching doesn’t show on the back.

Repeat these steps to make as much bacon as desired!

FELT PANCAKES:

Free felt breakfast food tutorial by Skirt Fixation for Sew Mama SewNote: If you want to make a plain pancake, simply leave off the syrup and butter pieces, and just stitch the two round pieces of felt together.

You will need:

1 sheet of pancake-brown felt

Dark brown felt (You can use large scraps)

Yellow felt (You can use small scraps)

Dark brown, medium brown, and yellow embroidery floss.

Small amount of stuffing.

Free felt breakfast food tutorial by Skirt Fixation for Sew Mama SewUsing the pancake pattern, cut out two light brown felt circles. Using the dark brown felt, cut out one syrup pattern. Using the yellow felt, cut out two small yellow butter patterns.

Free felt breakfast food tutorial by Skirt Fixation for Sew Mama Sew Put the two small yellow squares together, and stitch them in place on top of the syrup piece. Poke your needle up through the yellow pieces, and back down through the dark brown piece to secure it.

Free felt breakfast food tutorial by Skirt Fixation for Sew Mama SewStitch the dark brown syrup to one of the light brown circles. Use the same stitch as in previous step.

Free felt breakfast food tutorial by Skirt Fixation for Sew Mama Sew Stitch the two light brown circles together ¾ of the way using blanket stitch.

Free felt breakfast food tutorial by Skirt Fixation for Sew Mama Sew

Stuff lightly with stuffing and finish stitching up.

FELT TEABAGS:

Note: These smell really good!

Free felt breakfast food tutorial by Skirt Fixation for Sew Mama SewYou will need:

Scraps of white felt

White and colored embroidery thread

Colored ribbon

Aromatic dried herbs

Free felt breakfast food tutorial by Skirt Fixation for Sew Mama SewUsing the teabag pattern, cut out two pieces. Using the teabag tag pattern, cut out one tag.

Free felt breakfast food tutorial by Skirt Fixation for Sew Mama SewSandwich one end of the ribbon between the tops of the two teabag pieces. Stitch the pieces together using blanket stitch, leaving the bottom open.

Free felt breakfast food tutorial by Skirt Fixation for Sew Mama Sew Stuff the teabag with the dried herb leaves, then sew the bottom shut using blanket stitch. I chose to use spearmint in this teabag.

Free felt breakfast food tutorial by Skirt Fixation for Sew Mama SewOn the other end of the ribbon, fold the tag piece in half and sandwich the ribbon inside of the folded tag piece. Stitch around the tag with colored embroidery floss to close it. I also embroidered a small leaf on the tag for fun.

Free felt breakfast food tutorial by Skirt Fixation for Sew Mama Sew

If you want to see more felt food I’ve made, including a sweet little donut that would go fabulously with this breakfast, go on over to Skirt Fixation and check it out!

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How to Add Faux Fur Cuffs to Any Garment

Skirt Fixation's guide to add faux fur cuffs to any garment.

When I showed you Annie’s winter jacket, I promised a tutorial on how to add faux fur cuffs to any jacket (or garment!)  So that’s what I’ve got for you today.  Be sure to check out my tips for working with faux fur here before you begin.

Skirt Fixation's guide to add faux fur cuffs to any garment.

Step 1:

Measure your sleeve opening and add 1/2 inch.  This will be the width of your cuff.  Decided how tall you want your cuff to be, double it and add 1/2 inch.

Skirt Fixation's guide to add faux fur cuffs to any garment.

Step 2:

Fold your faux fur piece in 1/2 across the width, and sew with 1/2 inch seam allowance.  You will now have a circle of faux fur.

Skirt Fixation's guide to add faux fur cuffs to any garment.

Step 3:

Fold your cuff in 1/2 with the WRONG sides together, matching up the raw edges.

Skirt Fixation's guide to add faux fur cuffs to any garment.

Step 4:

If your jacket has a lining, you will want to separate it from the rest of the sleeve and slide it up the sleeve out of the way before this step.  Slide the cuff over the sleeve, matching the raw edges.  Pin really well, lining up the seams.

Skirt Fixation's guide to add faux fur cuffs to any garment.

Above is the view of what you just did laid out flat.

Skirt Fixation's guide to add faux fur cuffs to any garment.

Step 5:

Sew the cuff to the sleeve, catching both layers of cuff, the outer layer of the jacket and any batting.  But remember, any lining will be pulled up out of the way right now.  I found it easiest to sew this step with the needle INSIDE the sleeve.

If your jacket doesn’t have a lining, you need to finish these edges with a zigzag stitch or serger.  And then you’re done!

Skirt Fixation's guide to add faux fur cuffs to any garment.

If you have a lining, keep going…it’s about to get really pretty on the inside!  Above is what your sleeve looks like right now.

Skirt Fixation's guide to add faux fur cuffs to any garment.

Step 6:

If you have a lining, pull it back down over the raw edges of the cuff and sleeve.  Fold over the raw edges of the lining toward the wrong side by 1/2 inch.  Pin this in place over the raw edges of the cuff and sleeve.

Skirt Fixation's guide to add faux fur cuffs to any garment.

Step 7:

Hand stitch the lining over the cuff.  You will have a beautifully finished inside of your jacket, and an invisible, perfect finish on the outside.

Skirt Fixation's guide to add faux fur cuffs to any garment.

Great job!  Now you can add faux fur cuffs to any jacket!