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Lace Skirt to Trevi Top Refashion

Lace skirt refashion to a Trevi Top

In my last post I promised a full review on how I refashioned a lace skirt into the Trevi Top.

Lace skirt refashion to a Trevi Top

First of all, here’s the skirt I started with.  It’s lace (crocheted maybe?) and very pretty, but not super flattering to my figure, not long enough, and not really me as is.  So of course I had to refashion it and make it mine!

Because I was afraid the skirt would unravel once I cut into it, I tried to preserve as many of the existing seams as I could.  It seems the original makers of the skirt had the same idea because there was only 1 seam around the skirt, on one side.

The Trevi Top and Dress pattern was a perfect choice for this refashion because the arm and neck openings are bound with bias tape.  The other seams are french seams, leaving no raw edges either.  And the back placket is all enclosed on the edges as well.

Lace Skirt refashion step 1:

Lace skirt refashion to a Trevi Top

I laid out the front pattern piece lining up the bottom of the pattern piece with the hem of the skirt.  Then I carefully cut through 1 layer only across the armhole opening across the shoulder and down the neckline.

Lace Skirt refashion step 2:

Lace skirt refashion to a Trevi Top

I flipped over the front pattern piece and continued cutting the neckline opening, across the other shoulder, and back down the armhole opening, again only through 1 layer of the skirt.

Lace Skirt refashion step 3:

Lace skirt refashion to a Trevi Top

First I folded down the part of the skirt I’d cut out for the front.  Then I laid out the back piece of the Trevi Top and Dress pattern.  I did fold in the amount allowed for the placket up the back.  Then I continued cutting up the armhole opening, across the shoulder and down the back neckline opening.  Then I flipped over the back pattern piece and cut out the other half in the same manner as the front.

Lace Skirt Refashion step 4:

Lace skirt refashion to a Trevi Top

Carefully cutting through the top layer only, I cut up the center back of the skirt which was now looking more like a top!

Lace Skirt Refashion step 5:

Lace skirt refashion to a Trevi Top

The skirt had more width than I wanted the top to have, but I didn’t want to create side seams to take out some of that width after I’d worked so hard to preserve the integrity of the skirt this far!  I used the lining fabric (it was the perfect color, of course) to make both the back plackets and the bias tape for finishing both the arm and neck openings.  Once I had my placket pieces interfaced, I laid them out as you can see above, thus eliminating some of the fullness from the width and preserving the seamless construction.

Sandbridge Skirt sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

After this step, I continued with the instructions for the Trevi Top and Dress.  The only change I made to accommodate the original construction was making only the top button on the back placket functional, and eliminating the need for many buttonholes and cuts!

Sandbridge Skirt sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

I also kept the original waist tie, and by weaving it in and out of the holes at the waist level, I can have another look, slightly more fitted.

Needless to say I’m pretty pleased with this lace skirt refashion!  I only wish I had another lace skirt to play around with!

Lace Skirt to vest refashion by Skirt Fixation

Affiliate links are used in this post.  If you click, we might make a few pennies at no extra cost to you.  

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Free Patterns for March {Project Sew It}

Skirt Fixation sews up free patterns for Project Sew It

For March’s Project Sew It challenge, both Aria and Audrey sewed up FREE patterns for meeting the “bottoms” project.  (Project Sew It is a monthly inspirational sewing challenge created by Celina of Petit a Petit and Family.)

Skirt Fixation sews up free patterns for Project Sew It

Audrey’s Free Pattern Make:

Today’s post makes me really, really happy!  You see, about 6 years ago I had to throw away my favorite pair of yoga pants.  They were the only pair I’d ever had, I slept in them every single night, and they’d developed holes in some very conspicuous places.  But I’m sure you’ve had a favorite garment and know how hard this was for me, right?  Well, these specific yoga pants had lasted me about 10 years which probably justified the $80 I paid for them from a specialty tall company.  But since then I’ve been too cheap to put out another $100 bucks (price has gone up!!!) and have missed them ever since.

That all changed when Hey June Handmade published the Mountain Pose Pants pattern.  Did I mention it is a free pattern?  Yes.  I’m a huge fan of Hey June patterns as anyone who has been around her any time knows!  It’s the quality and professional results that you can achieve by sewing these patterns.

Skirt Fixation sews up free patterns for Project Sew It

For other tall ladies who want to know, the inseam of the Mountain Post Pants is 32”, and at the recommendation of Adrianna (the designer behind Hey June Handmade) I split up the additional 4” I needed to reach my 36” inseam by adding 2” at the knee on the shorten/lengthen line and 2” at the hem by continuing the flair at the bottom.  You may notice I didn’t hem these pants…I’m waiting to see if the double brushed poly fabric shrinks any more before hemming…or maybe I’m just reveling in a pair of yoga pants that are too long!!!

Skirt Fixation sews up free patterns for Project Sew It

And then there is the fabric I used.  If you have your ear tuned to the sewing world, you’ve heard lots and lots of chatter about double brushed poly knit fabric.  I wanted to know what all the fuss was about and ordered some wine colored double brushed poly knit from CaliFabrics.  In all the reviews I’ve read about double brushed poly, the author comments that they’d like to wrap themselves up in the fabric it’s so soft.  So I figured this fabric might make me a good pair of yoga pants to sleep in.  Let me tell you in a word: YES!

So now you know why this post makes me so happy…I’ve regained my favorite pair of yoga pants, possibly even better than the original pair due to the double brushed poly fabric.

Aria’s Free Pattern Make:

This month I was wanting to go with an easy pattern, partly because we have been pretty busy so I didn’t get around to starting my skirt until pretty late, and partly because next month is will probably be doing a bit more complicated pattern.

Skirt Fixation sews up free patterns for Project Sew It

I decided on Melly Sew’s Easy T-Shirt Skirt Tutorial because I wear the skirt Mom made me all the time! I started with a t-shirt my older brother no longer wanted.  This tutorial is SUPER easy! I had a lot of fun, partly because I didn’t even have to rip anything, and I was able to do it completely by myself!

Skirt Fixation sews up free patterns for Project Sew It

The hardest part about this skirt was probably the waistband because of the amount of stretching I had to do while sewing it.  I made a few changes to it as well.  I made the waistband a little wider so I can wear it lower down instead of on my waist, and I made the pockets deeper.  I always go for deeper pockets!  The pocket fabric is Birch Organic’s flight leftover from this dress.   Anyway, I’m really glad I made it and I will be wearing it all the time!

See you next month for the dress challenge…both of us are feeling really challenged even thinking about it!  Also, affiliate links are used in this post for really awesome products you should try…we love them and think you will too, that’s why we’ve included the links.  But legal powers that be want you to know we might make a few pennies if you click one of our affiliate links…

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Where the Wild Things Play {Twig & Tale Blog Tour}

Wild Things vests sewn by Skirt Fixation

Wild Thing vests sewn by Skirt Fixation

Sometimes you get to be part of something that is just plain fun!  That’s what today’s sewing is about…Where The Wild Things Play.  Warning: it’s a picture heavy post, but I think you’ll see why.  And if you make it to the end, reward yourself by entering the giveaway!

Wild Things vests sewn by Skirt Fixation

Recently an Indie sewing company decided to change it’s name.  The former Big Little pattern company changed their name to Twig + Tale.  It perfectly describes what this company is about.  Fun, nature, wild things, upcycling, and did I mention fun?  You simply must go over and check them out.

Wild Things vests sewn by Skirt Fixation

To celebrate the name change, Twig + Tale decided to host a blog tour.  We chose to use the Pathfinder Vest pattern and use the Wild Things upgrade to embellish the vest.  You can buy these two pattens bundled here.  We ended up sewing 4 Wild Thing vests.

Wild Things vests sewn by Skirt Fixation

There are 14 different animals you can make using the Wild Things pattern.  Of the 3 different wild thing vests the kids chose, only 1 of them has specific instructions, so that gives you an idea of how good this pattern is!  Only the panda is included, so we used the fox to create 2 wolves and the dinosaur to create a dragon.  Let’s go over the dragon first.

Wild Things vests sewn by Skirt Fixation

There is a free dragon upgrade, but it wasn’t released yet when we made the dragon as part of our Sewing For Kindergarten mini wardrobe.

Wild Things vests sewn by Skirt Fixation

If you look at this photo, you can see the horns were originally made from heavier weight leather.  But they flopped over, and so I changed them out for faux leather that matched the dragon’s spikes.

Wild Things vests sewn by Skirt Fixation

Then I added the wings, of course, as soon as they were released.  Since I was adding them after the vest was already sewn, I added some pipe cleaners in the “bones” of the wings to give them structure.  Then I turned under the part of the wings by the spikes and stitched them down there and at the shoulders.

Wild Things vests sewn by Skirt Fixation

When I showed David all the animal choices he wanted to be a dragon, so a dragon it was.  The outside of this dragon vest is some green fuzzy fleece from our stash, and the lining is Luminaries Gold by Maureen Cracknell’s Nightfall line for Art Gallery Fabrics.  This was a nod to the “Reach for the Stars” theme of the mini wardrobe.  I added a zipper to this vest instead of using the button and loops at the top.  There is a tutorial for how to do this here.

Wild Things vests sewn by Skirt Fixation

David had so much fun during the photo shoot playing the part of a dragon wild thing.

Wild Things vests sewn by Skirt Fixation

The original plan was to sew a wolf vest for Baby to go with David’s dragon vest.

Wild Things vests sewn by Skirt Fixation

These boys love the book “Where The Wild Things Are” and Max (the main character) puts on his wolf suit and makes mischief.  So Baby had to be a wolf.

Wild Things vests sewn by Skirt Fixation

The outside of this wolf vest is Golden Husky Faux Fur from Cali Fabrics.  In a nod to the line from the book, “That night in Max’s room a forest grew, and grew, and grew!”  We used Mystical Woods fabric from Art Gallery Fabrics designed by Maureen Cracknell.

Wild Things vests sewn by Skirt Fixation

Every time Baby put on this vest for a fitting and then for the photo shoot, he would begin to howl like a wolf.  A very cute, baby wolf.  Serious cuteness to see Baby trying to act tough and scary like a wolf.

Wild Things vests sewn by Skirt Fixation

I used the fox ears and tail to create the wolf vest.  I inserted pipe cleaners into the ears to try to make them stiffer and stand up better.

Wild Things vests sewn by Skirt Fixation

Also, the pockets were omitted from this vest, simply because the sewing with faux fur was complex enough without trying to figure out pockets!

Wild Things vests sewn by Skirt Fixation

Because I ordered a yard of the wolf fur, Thomas asked, and I acquiesced to making him wolf vest.

Wild Things vests sewn by Skirt Fixation

Simply because wolves travel in packs, I had enough to make them both, and making two was about as easy as making one.

Wild Things vests sewn by Skirt Fixation

This was not the original plan, so I didn’t have any fabric from Art Gallery Fabrics for the lining.  But Thomas just wanted black anyway, so a black lining fabric from the stash (leftover from a skirt refasion!) it was.

Wild Things vests sewn by Skirt Fixation

Even though I put pipe cleaners inside the ears, they are larger than the small wolf ears and ended up a little floppy, probably due to the heavy weight of the faux fur.  Thomas is cool with it, deciding at times to be a bear, a wolf, or various other creatures!

Wild Things vests sewn by Skirt Fixation

He’s just pleased to have gotten a vest out of the deal.

Wild Things vests sewn by Skirt Fixation

At his request, Thomas’s wolf tail is detachable.  It attaches to the lining with a snap.

Wild Things vests sewn by Skirt Fixation

Also, he is much more realistic at playing the part of a scary wolf!  I used a toggle button and some hair elastic to make closures for both the wolf wild thing vests.  Buttons or zippers just weren’t an option with fur that has this long of a pile.

Wild Things vests sewn by Skirt Fixation

Sewing with faux fur was a learning experience for me, and I’m sharing 30+ tips (so you don’t have to make the mistakes I did!) over on the Cali Fabrics blog.

Wild Things vests sewn by Skirt Fixation

Probably because there were so many cute options, and I had the outer fabric in my stash, I decided to sew a 4th wild thing vest for Annie.  She was overjoyed when she discovered she was getting a Wild Things vest too.

Wild Things vests sewn by Skirt Fixation

After looking for the options, she decided to be a panda.  I knew there was only one possible fabric to use for the lining, so at the last minute, and relying on her notorious super fast shipping, I ordered some Pandalings Pod Shadow knit fabric (designed by Katarina Roccella for Art Gallery Fabrics) from Imagine Gnats.

Wild Things vests sewn by Skirt Fixation

The Wild Things add on (which by the way is meant to be added onto a coat, but it’s very easy to add onto a vest, obviously!) included instructions and all the pattern pieces for a panda.  It was pretty easy to make.   Annie made the pom pom tail herself by following the directions included in the pattern.

Wild Things vests sewn by Skirt Fixation

The pockets have a fun paw print detail on them.  Using knit for the lining is not one of the recommended fabrics, but it worked out fine.  I just made sure to keep the knit fabric against the feed dogs when sewing the lining to the vest, to help pull along the knit fabric.  The knit fabric also makes this a very, very soft vest inside and out!

Wild Things vests sewn by Skirt Fixation

Instead of the button loops and buttons recommended in the pattern, I made actual buttonholes since the fur I was using has a low pile and isn’t too thick.  For the photo shoot, Annie wore her Uptown Downtown maxi dress made from Art Gallery Fabrics.

Wild Things vests sewn by Skirt Fixation

She didn’t think panda bears are very vicious, so had fun playing the part of a more gentle wild thing.

Wild Things vests sewn by Skirt Fixation

Here is a closer look at each of the fun linings.  It was really fun and rewarding to sew these Wild Things vests.  The dragon and smaller wolf vests are the same size, and so the boys will be able to interchange them.  Then when they outgrow them, they will have the opportunity to play panda, and wolf all over again!

Wild Things vests sewn by Skirt Fixation

As for me, I think it’s time to retire from the Wild Thing sewing business.  For a while, anyway, at least until I get all the fur cleaned up out of my sewing room!  Although there are still quite a few animal variations I haven’t sewn yet.  Which one would you make?

 

What would a Blog Tour be without a giveaway!

Art Gallery Fabrics is kindly sponsoring 2 yards of Art Gallery fabric of your choice. To make the prize extra sweet, we are also adding a collection of 5 Twig + Tale patterns of your choice.
International entries are very welcome. Our bloggers come from every corner of the world to celebrate the global nature of Twig +Tale too.
Enter using the rafflecopter below.
(The winning entry will be checked to ensure all criteria are met).
a Rafflecopter giveaway

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Denim Quilt made from Old Jeans

Denim quilt made by Skirt Fixation from old jeans

Denim quilt made by Skirt Fixation from old jeansTwo things gave me the final push I needed to finish this denim quilt that has been 10 years in the making: the Refashioner’s Jeanius challenge, and a threat from Mr. Skirt Fixation.
As faithful readers (and good counters) of the Skirt Fixation blog know, I have 4 sons.  Boys wear jeans and wear out jeans often.  Multiply that times 4 boys and you end up with a lot of jeans with holes in the knees.  Which leaves you an item you cannot donate to charity, but which has a lot of good, useable denim left.  Being the thrifty (pack rat?) type, for over 10 years, I’ve been stashing away these old jeans with the intent of using the denim someday.  Well, a few months ago, Mr. Skirt Fixation was digging through the attic and found my tote (okay, fine! TOTES) of old worn out jeans and suggested rather strongly that I use them or get rid of them.  He even offered to do it for me!  So it was time to get busy.

Denim quilt made by Skirt Fixation from old jeansOver the winter, I cut out hundreds of 7 inch squares from the usable parts remaining of the old jeans.  The next step was to sew a light and a dark square together across the diagonal (from corner to corner) with two seams, each one 1/4 inch from the center line.  Then hours were spend cutting them apart down the original diagonal line.  When I began to lose my steam, Thomas, my 10 year old son, got excited about and involved in the process.

Denim quilt made by Skirt Fixation from old jeansThe pile grew and grew and grew.  We needed 224 finished half square triangles (HST).  The finished quilt was intended for my oldest son who is (currently at 16) 6’8” so I was aiming for dimensions near king size.  The finished quilt is 76 x 88, so slightly larger than king size, but my tall son is not complaining!

Denim quilt made by Skirt Fixation from old jeansThe next step was to trim all the denim squares down to 6”.

Denim quilt made by Skirt Fixation from old jeansThe trimmings pile was beautiful in it’s own way and grew to be a mountain!

Denim quilt made by Skirt Fixation from old jeansWhen we finally had all 224 HST made, we looked up different layouts that used a dark and a light 1/2.  My son loved the look of this one, and so the piecing together began.  As I was piecing this, I realized I would never be able to wrestle a quilt this large through my home sewing machine.  The denim makes the quilt quite heavy, and the sheer size of it would be the end of me and probably my machine too!

Denim quilt made by Skirt Fixation from old jeans When the top was finally pieced, we all stood back and admired it for a while.  It was simply gorgeous! Denim quilt made by Skirt Fixation from old jeansThe next order of business was to choose the quilt backing.  My son decided he wanted a plaid flannel for the backing, and I ordered some flannel buffalo plaid. (affiliate link)

Denim quilt made by Skirt Fixation from old jeansI have a special Aunt who has taught my sister and I a lot about quilting, and it just so happens that she has a long arm quilting business.  She is an AMAZING quilter and walking through her house is like walking through a quilt museum!  And here’s an example of how fantastic she is: she offered to make the quilt sandwich for me!  So I got the fabric, the pieced top, and the batting to her.  We looked over quilting designs, discussing how the junctions where the HST came together on the corners were going to be nearly impossible to quilt through.

Denim quilt made by Skirt Fixation from old jeansWe finally settled on the top design, but later, after careful consideration and planning, with a bunch of her common sense and experience thrown in, she suggested the bottom design.

Denim quilt made by Skirt Fixation from old jeans

We all agreed it ended up much better than the original plan, and she was able to easily avoid the thick joints.

Denim quilt made by Skirt Fixation from old jeansWhen she had finished the quilt and we picked it up, she had another great suggestion.  Folded in half, and lined with flannel, this quilt would make a perfect sleeping bag for my very tall son!  After pondering and pondering on that idea, we decided to keep in open.  He plans to wrap up in it when there’s a situation where he needs a sleeping bag, but he loves it open on his bed too.

Denim quilt made by Skirt Fixation from old jeansYou may be wondering about the Refashioners challenge I mentioned at the beginning of this post?  This summer is the 2nd season of The Refashioners, and the theme is Jeanius.  (Last year was Get Shirty, and you can see how we participated here.) Well, how could we not sew along with a sewing contest that was all about refashioning jeans, when all we had to do was finish this quilt in time to enter?  (If you want to check out the absolutely mind boggling things other refashioners did with denim, click here.)  So all that was left for us to do was to bind the quilt.  Binding a quilt this size and weight by hand seemed too daunting of a task for me, so I turned to my expert, in house hand sewist – Allegra, and within about 2 weeks time she had the task completed!

Denim quilt made by Skirt Fixation from old jeansEveryone is delighted with the finished quilt.  Mr. Skirt Fixation is pleased about the amount of denim used up.  My son is delighted with his new quilt that is not only long enough for him, but rugged enough to last a lifetime.  And I’m inspired to make another one.  Or two.  Just don’t tell Mr. Skirt Fixation I have enough denim still stashed away to make several more!

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Summer Pajamas

Summer pajamas sewn by Skirt Fixation

Summer pajamas

This week I decided to make summer pajamas for some of my kids.  Two of my older boys decided they didn’t need Mom to sew them a new pair of “fun” summer pajamas, but the other 5 were interested.  I had ordered some fun fabric panels from Peekaboo Pattern Shop with summer pajamas in mind.  I just love the fabric she designs, and used it as inspiration for 4 of the 5 pairs of summer pajamas.

Summer pajamas for teen girl by Skirt Fixation

Allegra received a really fun pair of pajamas.  I used the Lane Raglan to make her a fun graphic tee from the Crazy Hair Don’t Care panel from Peekaboo Pattern Shop.  From the coordinating knit fabric, I sewed her a pair of summer pajama shorts using the Skyline Skort pattern and omitting the skirt.  (Irony from Skirt Fixation!)  The shorts fabric is currently sold out, but look at all these other fun fabrics designed by Peekaboo Pattern Shop!

Summer pajamas for teen girls sewn by Skirt Fixation

Aria chose some french terry fabric for her summer pajamas.  French terry is perfect for summer pajamas due to the breathability of the fabric.  The shorts pattern is again the Skyline Skort with the skirt omitted.  The french terry fabric is from Raspberry Creek Fabrics.  The top is also a Lane Raglan from french terry which was a dress in it’s former life!  This set is the softest ever…and I think she’ll be wearing the shirt outside of bedtime as well.  I know I would!

Summer pajamas for girl

When I saw this fabric panel at Peekaboo Pattern Shop, I knew it would be perfect for Annie.  For her top, I lengthened the Camden Raglan to tunic length and used some more of a skirt I had in the refashion pile for the red striped fabric.

summer pajamas for girl sewn by Skirt Fixation

For the bottoms, I used Lil Luxe Collection’s Slim Trousers pattern and the remnants of another blue striped skirt.  Annie sewed on the buttons on the back faux star pockets on the back, and there you have the perfect summer pajamas for Annie!

Matching summer pajamas for boys sewn by Skirt Fixation

The little boys had to have something semi matching.  When I ordered the I Want S’More fabric panel (sold out, but check out these other cute ones!) from Peekaboo Pattern Shop and the coordinating s’mores fabric I hadn’t planned on making each boy a set of pajamas.

Boys summer pajamas sewn by Skirt Fixation

But then when everyone was getting some summer pajamas, and I had enough fabric to make two pairs of shorts, I had to try to make another shirt.  Allegra wrote the words with a white fabric marker and eyeballed the stick.

Boys summer pajamas sewn by Skirt Fixation

I appliquéd on some marshmallows and stitched around Allegra’s art work.  For the shirt pattern, I used the Oliver + S Field Trip Raglan Tee.  The shorts pattern are Kid Shorts from Made.

Summer pajamas sewn by Skirt Fixation

With some marathon sewing, in two days 5 of my kids had new summer pajamas.  Plus I snuck in a new pair of summer pajama shorts for me, also using the Skyline Skort pattern and some black sweatshirt fleece.  It’s a good thing because now I think I need to go take a nap!

Affiliate links are used in this post, because ever optimistic, we hope to make some money on this blog thing someday.  Maybe!

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Our favorite kind of skirt refashion

At The Piano painting by Vladimir Volegov brought to live by Skirt Fixation for their Living Skirt Art series. Check them all out!

We know we’ve posted a lot of these before, but they are probably our favorite kind of skirt refashion, so you’ll have to put up with one (or maybe more!)  Today we’re bringing home a post from the Refashion Coop.

So it’s not often you can take a skirt from mini to maxi, but it’s really easy with this little trick.

 

Start with two skirts!  Okay, so maybe that’s cheating?  But the long tiered skirt’s bottom tier was all ripped up from stepping on it, and had to come off which made the long skirt too short by itself.  Alright, here’s the process:
Step 1: cut off the waistband of the tiered skirt.  Bye for now…or cut off the tags and use it as a headband.
Step 2: zig zag the two layers together.  You really need the bottom layer to act as a slip under the quite sheer top layer.  Also, this makes the next step easier.
Step 3: Topstitch around the bottom of the mini, catching the other skirt firmly underneath.
Tada!  A new skirt from mini to maxi!
Why on earth did I make a WHITE skirt for my teenage daughter?  Here is the link to find out why, it’s really very beautiful!

 

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Leather Skirt Refashion

Indiana Jones cosplay outfit created and sewn by Skirt Fixation

Today I’m bringing home a tutorial I posted over at Refashion Co-op.  This is the step by step on how I refashioned a leather skirt and crumbling leather jacket into my son’s Indiana Jones Cosplay leather jacket.

My son has been begging for a leather jacket.  So I made him one for his Cosplay Indiana Jones outfit.  Read all about it here.
I started with a leather skirt and a leather jacket that was the same exact suede brown leather as the skirt I’d bought many years ago.  Apparently the jacket was very old too as some of the leather was quite brittle.

Here’s the process I used:
Step one: Harvest the zipper from the old jacket.
Step 2: Take off the sleeves.
Here you can see how the leather from the old jacket ripped very easily!
Step 4: Trace the pattern for the front of the jacket onto the bak of the skirt.  (The back of the skirt had a slit, so I needed the front of the skirt for the back of the jacket.)  I used the Downton Duffle pattern for my template.  I found it easiest to use chalk to mark on the leather.
Here you can see how I preserved the side seams of the skirt for the side seams of the jacket!  The less sewing on leather, the better because leather retains every hole you make in it.  This also allowed me to easily keep the lining of the skirt together with the leather since I was using the same hem.
Step 5: Next I traced the front of the jacket onto one side of the skirt back.  Then I flipped it over to ensure that the two sides of my jacket back would be perfectly even.
Step 6: I traced the collar piece (from yet another pattern!) onto the remains of the skirt.  I needed two collar pieces and two collar stand pieces and got them from the skirt.
Step 7: I wanted to reuse those cool pockets from the original jacket, so I traced around them and cut them out.
Step 8:  I cut out my 4 pocket flaps from the sides of the original jacket, under the arms where there didn’t seem to be as much decay.
Step 9: I sewed one of the lower pockets from the original jacket onto the lining only.  My son had requested a secret interior pocket.
Step 10: I sewed the new pockets I’d made onto the fronts.  So the patch pockets on the new jacket front actually have 2 pockets, one behind the zipper and one under the flap!
Step 11: I inserted the zipper in an totally unconventional way!  I just separated the lining from the skirt along the edge and slipped the zipper in.  Then I topstitched the two back together.
At this point I stopped taking photos, but it was pretty standard for jacket making.  I sewed the shoulders together on both the lining and the leather, separately to have inclosed seams.  Then I attached the collar stand and collar.  Finally, I attached the sleeves, using the set in method.  I ended up having to open up the back seam and narrow down the jacket for my very thin son.  But he’s totally enamored with the fininshed results, and I’m pretty proud I stuck with it until the end.  There were some points there where I was ready to give up!
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Winter 2016 Skirt Awards

Winter 2016 Skirt Awards ceremony hosted by Skirt Fixation and presenting the 11 best skirts of winter 2016.

Winter 2016 Skirt Awards ceremony hosted by Skirt Fixation and presenting the 11 best skirts of winter 2016.

Spring is officially here, and so you know what that means; Winter Skirt Awards time!  The winter of 2015/2016 brought us some historic skirt making.  Seriously, grab yourself a snack and have a seat because you are going to want to hang out and admire these skirt creations!

Best Woven Skirt Award

First up we have the Best Woven Skirt Award.  Hands down, this award goes to Teresa of Dandelion Drift.  This lady’s Arielle skirt stole our heart the moment we saw it.  Maybe it was the pattern matching across the button placket?  Here’s your badge, Teresa.

Winter 2016 Skirt Awards ceremony hosted by Skirt Fixation and presenting the 11 best skirts of winter 2016.

Best Skirt Tutorial

Sometimes in the sewing universe, there is an event called a sew along.  And when it’s a week long occasion for a skirt that’s pinch-your-cheeks cute, there’s really no contest!  The Ani-Mazing skirt sew along produced the cutest skirts probably in forever!  Here’s a badge for the amazing ladies of Little Lizard King.

Winter 2016 Skirt Awards ceremony hosted by Skirt Fixation and presenting the 11 best skirts of winter 2016.

Best New Pattern

Now we think that pretty much every skirt should have pockets; with only a few exceptions.  So with that in mind, you’ll understand why we award the Best New Pattern badge to Kimberly of Straight Stitch Designs for her queen of pockets skirt, The Wedgewood.

Winter 2016 Skirt Awards ceremony hosted by Skirt Fixation and presenting the 11 best skirts of winter 2016.

Best Knit Skirt

Really, this award should say Best Knit SkirtS because Heidi, of Elegance and Elephants made THREE darling knit skirts for her daughter, each of them worthy of this badge!  Click through to see the other two cuties.

http://www.eleganceandelephants.com/2016/02/three-little-skirts.html

Best Maxi Skirt

Project Run & Play Season 11 brought us some fantastic skirt action!  Seriously, every week we were tied up in knots over the cuteness of the skirts!  But this maxi skirt by Tasha of Glitter + Wit really takes the cake.  Tasha, please accept this badge.

Winter 2016 Skirt Awards ceremony hosted by Skirt Fixation and presenting the 11 best skirts of winter 2016.

Best Little Skirt

Again, Project Run & Play is in the spotlight because of this little skirt.  Courtney, from Sweeter Than Cupcakes, created the most perfect BB8 skirt.  If you’ve seen this skirt, you know how much we love BB8, and why we’re awarding Courtney’s skirt this badge.

Winter 2016 Skirt Awards ceremony hosted by Skirt Fixation and presenting the 11 best skirts of winter 2016.

Most Creative Skirt

We’ve made bubble skirts for little girls before, and we’ve made circle skirts for both big and little girls, but the twisted bubble twirly circle skirt Kennis of Itch To Stitch made combines both.  It is so incredibly creative we just can’t stand it!  Be sure to take a closer look to see that fabric and how she made it (because it’s really easy!)  Kennis, here is your well-deserved badge.

Winter 2016 Skirt Awards ceremony hosted by Skirt Fixation and presenting the 11 best skirts of winter 2016.

Most Fun Skirt

If it were possible, we would award the skirt Rebecca of Dobbin’s Bobbins created, more than one award.  Seriously.  A skirt in which her daughter can sit down, open the pockets, and play dollhouse?  It doesn’t get better than this!  Rebecca, take a curtsy as you accept this badge!

Winter 2016 Skirt Awards ceremony hosted by Skirt Fixation and presenting the 11 best skirts of winter 2016.

Best Skirt Refashion

In the long lasting civil war between skirts and pants, Debbie, of Lily Sage and Co, gained a victory for team skirts when she refashioned a pair of wide leg pants into this fabulous skirt!  Debbie, we’re delighted to give you this badge!

Winter 2016 Skirt Awards ceremony hosted by Skirt Fixation and presenting the 11 best skirts of winter 2016.

Fancy Skirt Award

You’ll recognize this skirt from the halls of Project Run and Play also.  After all, who could have missed a skirt this fancy?  It’s the brainchild of RaeAnna, of Sewing Mama RaeAnna.  Her little girl truly was the luckiest girl around.  RaeAnna, here’s your sparkling, fancy, glittery badge!

Winter 2016 Skirt Awards ceremony hosted by Skirt Fixation and presenting the 11 best skirts of winter 2016.

Best Winter Skirt

We’re pretty sure everyone will be talking about the skirt Cassie made every holiday for years to come.  Cassie, from Lily Shine Boutique does nothing halfway, and this skirt.  Oh, this skirt!  Made from the branches of two trees, Cassie truly created a masterpiece.  We really have no words, so why don’t you make an acceptance speech for this badge, Cassie?

Winter 2016 Skirt Awards ceremony hosted by Skirt Fixation and presenting the 11 best skirts of winter 2016.

There you have it!  The most amazing, the most memorable, the most award winning skirts of Winter 2015!  If you won a badge today, please right click to take it home and display it proudly, you earned it!  For everyone else, please let us know when you come across an award winning skirt.  We’ll see you at the end of spring for the next Skirt Awards ceremony!

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Black & White Refashion and the updated Lane Raglan

Mini skirt refashion by Skirt Fixation

It’s been quite a while since I’ve sewn one of my favorite kind of skirt refashions for myself.  But I’m not sure why because they are so fast and easy and comfortable!

Here’s what I started with:

Mini skirt refashion by Skirt Fixation

And by using my own tutorial, I made myself a new skirt!  I’m such a maxi skirt lover; it’s totally a byproduct of being 6 feet tall.

Mini skirt refashion by Skirt Fixation

 

Things I love about this kind of refashion: All the hard work is already done.  No waistband to sew, no pockets to install, no muslin to make, no fitting and fitting and fitting, and NO hemming!

Mini skirt refashion by Skirt Fixation

Really I don’t have too much to say about this skirt, just this: if you haven’t refashioned one of these for yourself yet, DO IT!

Mini skirt refashion by Skirt Fixation

Now onto the shirt!  This is the NEWLY released Lane Raglan pattern by Hey June Patterns.  It’s no secret I’m a fan of anything Adrianna, the genius behind Hey June Patterns, creates.  But we’re very loyal to the Lane Raglan, pulling it out whenever we need a comfortable basic.  We’ve had a Lane Raglan sew/wear off Round 1 and Round 2 when the pattern was updated to include thumbholes and a hoodie.  And we’ve also hacked it into a cardigan.

Mini skirt refashion by Skirt Fixation

So, I have to admit I was a little hesitant to try the newly updated Lane Raglan pattern due to loving it so much and knew that the fit had been altered on the latest update.  Well!  After sewing up the new update, here’s where the old pieces are!

Mini skirt refashion by Skirt Fixation

Just for the record, this is the 3rd one I’ve made.  So yeah, there will be a Lane Raglan sew/wear off Round 3 coming soon!  For this one I used the elbow length sleeves and shortened them a little bit for summer.  I’d like to say it was intentional, but the fact of the matter is I didn’t have enough fabric to go the whole length!  Funny story: I was really using up scraps to make this wardrobe basic, and the front and one sleeve are from leftover bamboo cotton from making this skirt, while the back and other sleeve are leftover from making this skirt!  But they’re both the same shade of black, so it’s all good!

Mini skirt refashion by Skirt Fixation

I also used the new scooped hem, which I really love.  I mean, I love the banded hem, but I think this one is going to be in constant rotation this summer.

Mini skirt refashion by Skirt Fixation

Last note:  Annie, my 7 year old was the photographer for this photo shoot! She told me how to pose, where to stand and was very serious about it all!  I guess because we’re so often on different sides of the camera she was really excited about shooting this one for me. I have to say she did pretty good, although I think her perspective makes me look even taller, if possible!

Mini skirt refashion by Skirt Fixation

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Lane Raglan Cardigan

Lane Raglan Cardigan hack tutorial by Skirt Fixation

Lane Raglan Cardigan hack tutorial by Skirt FixationI promised you a tutorial on how to turn the Lane Raglan pattern by Hey June Handmade into a cropped, 3/4 length sleeve, cardigan. It’s really quite easy, so let’s get started.

First of all, you need to cut out your front pattern piece one size larger than you usually wear. The other thing you need to do before sewing is make your length adjustments. The length adjustments are really quite easy and don’t need photos to explain. Simply shorten the sleeves and the front and back pieces to the length you want them to be. Then add the cuffs and waistband as instructed in the Lane Raglan pattern instructions.

Lane Raglan Cardigan hack tutorial by Skirt Fixation
The button up front can be done two different ways, either before or after the garment is constructed. We changed it to a cardigan after sewing the Lane Raglan as instructed because we thought it made the neckband easier to deal with.

Lane Raglan Cardigan hack tutorial by Skirt Fixation
Step 1:
Cut the finished Lane Raglan up the front. The easiest way to do this is to lay your front pattern piece on top of the garment.

Lane Raglan Cardigan hack tutorial by Skirt Fixation
Step 2:
Add a piece of interfacing inside both fronts about 1” wide by the length of the front.

Lane Raglan Cardigan hack tutorial by Skirt Fixation
Step 3:
Fold over the interfaced part, along the edge of the interfacing, press, and edge stitch it in place.
Step 4:
Sew buttonholes and buttons. We chose to sew double buttonholes because we just love the sweet, vintage look of it.
If you were going to change it to a cardigan before sewing the Lane together, you would cut the front in 1/2 and apply interfacing as pictured above. The you would attach the neckband and waistband starting and ending at the fronts of the cardigan. Then, fold over and sew as instructed above.

Lane Raglan Cardigan hack tutorial by Skirt Fixation
So there you have it! Pretty easy way to make yourself a cropped, 3/4 length sleeve cardigan from your Lane Raglan pattern. And if you didn’t hear, the Lane Raglan has gotten (another) update! The first update included a hood and thumbholes. You can see our versions of that update in this blog post. As if it wasn’t pretty much the most awesome pattern ever, the new update includes options for a curved hemline, elbow length sleeves, 3/4 length sleeves, and a long hemmed sleeves with no band. The upper chest area and sleeves were slimmed down and the shape of the raglan sleeves were changed slightly for a more flattening shape. Also, there is the ability to make a full bust adjustment.

Lane Raglan Cardigan hack tutorial by Skirt Fixation
To see the original Skirt Art post we made this version of the Lane Raglan for, go to this post.  We used heavenly French Terry Fabric (Aruba Blue) from JoAnn Fabrics. (affiliate link)   To purchase your own Lane Raglan pattern from Hey June Handmade, go here.  It’s on sale for until 11:59 pm MST for only $7.50 which we think is a screaming good deal!