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Sante Fe Top Review

Sante Fe tops sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

Sante Fe tops sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

I’ve got a new favorite top, to sew and to wear! It’s the Sante Fe by Hey June Handmade. Since I love everything I’ve sewn from this company, I was pretty sure the Sante Fe was going to be a win too. Just to be safe I made a muslin first. I used some charcoal bamboo knit fabric from Cali Fabrics.

Sante Fe tops sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

This fabric is light, and swingy, and just perfect for this pattern.  I had never sewn a neckline with binding instead of a band, and I really like the clean finish. The cuffs on the arms have a similar clean finish. In fact, everything on the inside of this shirt is so clean and finished that I accidentally wore it inside out the other day…and no one noticed!

Sante Fe tops sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation
I made view C and the only change I made for the muslin was to lengthen the dolman sleeves by about 2 inches to accommodate for my wide shoulders.

Sante Fe tops sewn and reviewed by Skirt FixationLike all Hey June Handmade patterns we’ve sewn, this one is easy to follow.  The illustrations are drawn and the instructions are clear and complete.  It can be made in 7 sizes from XS to 2X.  There are 6 different variations you could make.

Sante Fe tops sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

After making this muslin, I decided to make another Sante Fe Top the next day! The only change I made for fit was to raise the neckline by about 1 inch and shorten the binding accordingly. I used some cheap knit fabric I picked up at Hancock Fabric’s going out of business sale. It’s lightweight and only has two way stretch, which makes it another great fit for this pattern.

Sante Fe tops sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

For a little Anthro-esque touch, I added a strip of blue lace down the front seam. I polled my sewing friends on Instagram before adding it, and there was overwhelming support for this idea. One of my sewing friends suggested adding the lace to the raglan sleeves of view F, and since I absolutely love this idea, I guess I’ll be making another Sante Fe Top soon!

Sante Fe tops sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

You might have noticed I left both the hems of these Sante Fe Tops raw edges.  This is for 2 reasons.  1: knit fabric doesn’t fray, so no hemming needed.  2: my double needle is currently in time out for not meeting my expectations for hem perfection.  I knew the situation wouldn’t improve with thin fabrics.

Sante Fe tops sewn and reviewed by Skirt FixationHere’s what I love about the fit of the Sante Fe top: it hugs your curves, and then flares out for a looser fit around the waist and hips. The result is about the most comfortable shirt ever. I’ve been wearing one or other of these every week!
So if you’ve got some cheap lightweight knit fabric laying around that you purchased before you knew what you were doing when buying knit fabric (not that I’d know anything about that, ahem!) turn it into some Sante Fe Tops! You can thank me later.

Oh, and the Halifax Hoodie is currently the featured pattern which means it’s on sale, so grab it too while you’re at Hey June Handmade.  You’re going to need it this fall!

Affiliate links are used in this post.  I would have been using them on all Hey June Handmade posts before this, but I just recently realized they have an affiliate program!  I’m just telling you this in case you are opposed to helping support my fabric habit, and don’t want to click on any links.

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Annie’s 4H City Park Tee Dress

Young girl sews her own dress for 4H project!

Young girl sews her own dress for 4H project!

Annie sewed a fun project for 4H this year.  Last year she sewed a skirt, and every year the child is supposed to show advancement of skills.  Now, in her level (K-2,) this isn’t a requirement and everyone gets a blue ribbon no matter what they create.  But we decided it was a good opportunity for Annie to learn some new skills.

Young girl sews her own dress for 4H project!

Adrianna just released the City Park Tee, and then did a series of tutorials on how to make the City Park Tee into a dress.  I showed the 3 looks to Annie and she chose the classic straight tee dress.  I asked Annie to share what she remembered/loved from making her City Park Tee dress, and here’s what she said:

We made it 20 inches longer than the longest size which was just above my ankles.  We used the City Park Tee into a dress using a tutorial from Hey June Handmade.  The neckband was pretty tricky but I put lots of pins in it.  It has different options for sleeves, but I used the short sleeve option.  I chose this fabric because brown looks better than light colors on my body.  We used almost all of this fabric that we had.  My favorite part of making this dress is getting to wear it.

Young girl sews her own dress for 4H project!

Just for reference, Annie is 8.  This was her 1st time sewing with knit fabric.  I kept her in constant supervision, sometimes helping to steer the fabric through the machine.  We also talked about each step of the directions and what it meant.  The City Park Tee is a very easy pattern to follow, and has illustrations for each step.  It really wasn’t too hard for Annie to understand and picture most steps before she started sewing it.

Young girl sews her own dress for 4H project!

Annie now regularly haunts our knit fabric stash plotting and planning the next City Park Tee or Dress she’s going to make!  I’m so proud of her, and if you are too, leave a comment!

Affiliate links are used in this post so we can feed Annie’s new sewing addiction!!!

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Mix ‘n Match Swimwear

Mix 'n Match swimwear sewn by Skirt Fixation

Mix 'n Match swimwear sewn by Skirt Fixation

Today is my stop on the Summer Swimwear blog tour.  Recently, Call Ajaire, Gracious Threads, and The Wolf and the Tree all released swimwear patterns.  Follow along on the blog tour to see what everyone made, and also enter below to win some prizes.

Mix 'n Match swimwear sewn by Skirt Fixation

I signed up for the Summer Swimwear blog tour because I am a beginner at sewing swimwear and wanted to be challenged to improve.  One time I had sewn swimwear before was last summer when I made Annie a swimsuit for our Modern Chloris mini wardrobe.  Since that suit is still fitting her pretty well, I wanted to create mix n’ match swimwear, so she can choose which ones to wear and still match.

Mix 'n Match swimwear sewn by Skirt Fixation

Here’s what Annie had to start with:

Tankini Top Pattern: Modified Charming Tee by Lil Luxe Collection (Detailed pattern review & photos here.)

Tankini Top Fabric: Navy performancewear fabric from JoAnn Fabrics

Tankini Skirt Pattern: Cabana Swim Bottoms by PeekABoo Pattern Shop affiliate link  (Detailed pattern review & photos here.)

Tankini Skirt Fabric: White Fans on Navy Lycra Swimsuit Fabric from The Fabric Fairy

Swimsuit lining from The Fabric Fairy

Mix 'n Match swimwear sewn by Skirt Fixation

I started adding pieces by sewing a Just Keep Swimming rash guard from ultra thin white swimwear fabric from my stash.  Annie is very fair and burns easily, so the idea is to cover up as much skin as possible while still allowing her to enjoy the water.  I used this fabric intending that whatever top is underneath could still show through.

Mix 'n Match swimwear sewn by Skirt Fixation

It would also be fun to make a rash guard from this mesh fabric from Imagine Gnats.  The Just Keep Swimming rash guard was very easy to make.  The patterns are complete, easy to follow and illustrated with both photographs and illustrations.  Making this rash guard was just like making a t-shirt but with swimwear fabric.

Mix 'n Match swimwear sewn by Skirt Fixation

Next I sewed a pair of medium shorts with a yoga waistband from the Just Keep Swimming pattern.  Once again, this was a very easy sew.  I used fabric from Hancock Fabric’s going out of business sale.  I wish I’d gotten a whole bunch more because it’s very thick and not transparent.

Mix 'n Match swimwear sewn by Skirt Fixation

Feeling confident with my beginner swimwear sewing abilities, I decided to tackle a tankini top from the Classic Malliot pattern by Call Ajaire.  I ended up with something Annie can wear, (and likes) but had tough go of it!

Mix 'n Match swimwear sewn by Skirt Fixation

I think before I tackle another swimsuit from this pattern, I’m going to up my swimwear sewing abilities.  I wouldn’t recommend this pattern for other beginners to sewing swimwear…it’s probably not the pattern, just my lack of sophistication at sewing with swimwear fabrics.

Mix 'n Match swimwear sewn by Skirt Fixation

I used more fabric from the Hancock Fabrics sale with fabric for the back ties leftover from sewing the skirt last year.  I sewed view G in a size 7 width with size 12 length as I did for all the swimwear mix ’n match pieces I sewed.

Mix 'n Match swimwear sewn by Skirt Fixation

In the end, I guess that it doesn’t matter that I missed catching the lining in a few spots, (maybe, probably) attached the straps wrong, and didn’t stretch the fabric evenly while topstitching.  All that really matters is that Annie has a new swimsuit that actually fits her which she loves.

Join in on the Summer Swimwear Tour fun by using the hashtag #sewswimtour to share your favorite swimwear makes.  And don’t forget to enter to win these fabulous prizes from our other sponsors!
Prizes include:
– 1 pattern The Classic Maillot pattern by Designs by Call Ajaire
– 1 pattern The Swim and Surf Shorts by Gracious Threads
– 1 pattern Just Keep Swimming by The Wolf and the Tree
– 1 pattern of choice (excludes bundles) by Pienkel
– 1 pattern of choice by AimerLae & Finn
– 1 pattern of choice by Rachel Rossi Design
– Free Jellyfish Swim Cap pattern via Sew by Pattern Pieces Group
– 1 pattern of choice by Dandelions n Dungarees
– 1 pattern of choice by E + M patterns
– 5 patterns of choice by George & Ginger
– $30 gift certificate by The Fabric Fairy
– 1 pattern of choice by Sunday Girl Designs
– 1 pattern of choice by 5 out of 4 Patterns
That’s 17 patterns + $30 in fabric!!
Enter the giveaway below:
During the tour Designs by Call Ajaire is offering 20% off all patterns in the Etsy shop using the code SWIMTOUR, Gracious Threads is offering 15% off the purchase of 3 or more patterns in her shop (no coupon needed), and The Wolf and the Tree is offering 15% off patterns in her shop using the code SWIMTOUR as well.  So take a few minutes to visit Call Ajaire, Gracious Threads, and The Wolf and the Tree and of course the rest of the lovely blogs we have on the tour:
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Cascade Skirt {All The Skirts: Megan Nielsen & Imagine Gnats}

Cascade Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

Due to technical difficulties (also known as a waiting line for the sewing machine because of 4H project deadlines) Friday’s All The Skirts post is being published today.  (More on those awesome 4H projects coming soon!)

Cascade Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

The final skirt for All The Skirts: Megan Nielsen & Imagine Gnats is the Cascade Skirt.  The Cascade skirt has a lot of things going on in one amazing skirt.  It’s a wrap skirt, a circle skirt, has options to tie in the front,  the back or button up, and has a high low hem!  And beside all that, we decided to make it into a swim suit coverup.

French terry Cascade skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

Imagine you’ve been swimming for a couple of hours and it’s time to settle down on the grassy shore and watch everyone else for a while.  You wade up to the shore, grab your Cascade Skirt made from jade french terry backed wick away lycra fabric., and wrap it around you like a towel, except waaaaay classier because it’s the Cascade Skirt!

French terry Cascade skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

The Cascade Skirt can be made in 5 sizes from XS to XL.  There are 3 versions to choose from, and the variations all depend on how you want to close the skirt.  Tie in front, tie in back, or a simple double button closure in the front.  This pattern is rated a 1 out of 5 skill level needed.  All the illustrations are drawn and very easy to follow.

French terry Cascade skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

Since the side seams can show due to the high low hem,  instructions are included for french seams.  We just love thoughtful touches like that.  There are only 3 pattern pieces needed for making any of the views of the Cascade Skirt.  The pattern suggests hand tacking the waistband down, and even though I usually avoid hand sewing like the plague, I found this to be the best solution for getting the waistband not to twist.  I may or may not have paid Allegra in chocolate to rip it out for me.

French terry Cascade skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

Let’s move on the that delicious jade french terry backed wick away lycra fabric.  There are so many fabrics at Imagine Gnats that could be used to make a lovely Cascade Skirt.  I almost went with this eyelet because the Cascade Skirt instructions include directions for lining it.  And then there’s this drapey knit.  Finally, I did the only sensible thing to do and asked Rachel, the owner of Imagine Gnats for her help.

French terry Cascade skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

When I finally settled on the idea of a swim suit coverup, she helped me choose this gorgeous french terry fabric.  While this color matches Aria’s swim suit and she immediately claimed this Cascade Skirt, I’m pretty sure I’ll be sewing at least one more.

French terry Cascade skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

Speaking of sewing Megan Nielsen patterns and Imagine Gnats fabric, it’s time to vote on those entries in the Inlinkz sew along.  The crowd favorite will win 1 Megan Nielsen PDF pattern and $50 to spend at Imagine Gnats.  Also, the Rafflecopter is still open for a few more days, so enter away for your chance to win 1 Megan Nielsen PDF pattern and $50 to spend at Imagine Gnats!

a Rafflecopter giveaway

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Laminated Forest Backpacks

Forest Floor laminated backpacks sewn by Skirt Fixation

Forest Floor laminated backpacks sewn by Skirt Fixation

The final installment in my Forest Floor Fabric sewing is the little backpacks I made.  My original plan for the Forest Floor Fabrics Blog tour was to make the clothing and the Forest Friends pouches.

Forest Floor laminated backpacks sewn by Skirt Fixation

With that in mind I asked Bonnie Christine (the designer of the Forest Floor Fabrics) to send me small scraps from quite a few of the different prints.  I believe my exact words were, “so small you’d normally throw them in the trash!”  But she was so generous with the size of the pieces she sent me, that I knew I had to make something larger.  And I knew exactly which item I would cross off my 2016 Sewing Plans Pinterest board; the heart backpack.

Forest Floor laminated backpacks sewn by Skirt Fixation

But when I looked through the pattern, I realized Abby, of Sew Much Ado, had also created a Bunny backpack pattern, and I had enough fabric to make that too!

Forest Floor laminated backpacks sewn by Skirt Fixation

Before I began constructing the backpacks, I laminated the outside pieces with Pellon Vinyl-Fuse Gloss to make the backpack more durable.  It was so easy and created such a fun result I think I’m on a mission to vinyl all the things now!  Because this is also a stabilizer, I eliminated the interfacing from these pieces.

Forest Floor laminated backpacks sewn by Skirt Fixation

One change I made to the Heart backpack pattern was to use some webbing I had instead of constructing my own straps.  The other change was to use an exposed zipper for added girly-ness!

Forest Floor laminated backpacks sewn by Skirt Fixation

For Annie’s backpack I used Wild Posy Flora fabric and the FREE pattern from Sew Much Ado.  She is completely in love with this new backpack.  She says she loves the heart shape, the flowers and it’s size.  She says it’s just big enough to carry her water bottle and a few other treasures!

Forest Floor laminated backpacks sewn by Skirt Fixation

For the baby boy’s backpack I used Sew Much Ado’s FREE bunny backpack pattern.   The main part of the backpack uses Capped Dim fabric and the straps are from Maple Mill Fog fabric.  I wasn’t sure if Baby would like the backpack or even keep it on, but once he saw his sister wearing hers, he couldn’t be parted from it!

Forest Floor laminated backpacks sewn by Skirt Fixation

Both backpacks are lined with Timber Nightfall fabric.

Forest Floor laminated backpacks sewn by Skirt Fixation

The entire time I was sewing these backpacks I couldn’t believe these are free patterns!  They are so amazingly awesome that I know I’ll be making them over and over again.

Forest Floor laminated backpacks sewn by Skirt Fixation

Today I’m sharing a round up of 12 boy’s backpack patterns over at Our Chez Nous for Boys Sewing Week!  Psst!  There’s a great giveaway over there too!

Forest Floor laminated backpacks sewn by Skirt Fixation

Affilate links are used in this post because you know the drill…you click, we get pennies!  It’s one way of giving us your 2 cents about this post.  Another way is to leave a comment…which we LOVE!

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Erin Maternity Skirt {All The Skirts: Megan Nielsen & Imagine Gnats}

Hello Holli wearing the Erin Maternity skirt by Megan Nielsen. Sewn with fabric from Imagine Gnats.

Holli from Hello Holli is sharing with us the next Megan Nielsen skirt pattern.  Brace yourself for serious awwww factor!

Hello Holli wearing the Erin Maternity skirt by Megan Nielsen.  Sewn with fabric from Imagine Gnats.

Hello Skirt Fixation readers!

One fabulous thing about the ladies here reviewing ALL THE SKIRTS is that they can cover girls, teens, and women’s patterns. They’ve got it all covered! Except… maternity! So lucky me, in my last little bit of pregnancy, I got to jump in and sew up the Erin Maternity Skirt by Megan Nielsen. I’ve been a long time admirer of Megan Nielsen’s aesthetic so I jumped at the chance to sew up one of her patterns. Spoiler alert: It won’t be the last time I sew one up- I loved it!

Hello Holli wearing the Erin Maternity skirt by Megan Nielsen.  Sewn with fabric from Imagine Gnats.

The Erin Maternity skirt is a knit pencil skirt with an elastic waist and side ruching. I like to wear my giant belly proudly so I’m no stranger to pencil skirts and pregnancy- but I usually just wear knit ones a size larger and wear them under my belly. By the end of pregnancy wearing things under my belly is anything but comfortable, so this over-the-belly style is perfect right through till the end. Speaking of the end- these pictures were taken at 38 weeks (baby was born at 39), and as you can see my belly still fits! I wish I’d have made like 5 of these much sooner in my pregnancy as it was much more comfortable than the other skirts I’d been wearing.  I love the option of wearing it with a top tucked in like I did here, or with a longer  loose top.

Hello Holli wearing the Erin Maternity skirt by Megan Nielsen.  Sewn with fabric from Imagine Gnats.

I selected my size based on my normal pre-pregnancy size as directed and found that to be accurate. The construction was easy as could be- a definite beginner friendly project. It came together really quickly, and it’s a good thing, because I didn’t have much energy left for things like sewing, cooking dinner, or getting myself off of the couch ☺ The instructions were easy to follow and the pattern itself was well drafted.

Hello Holli wearing the Erin Maternity skirt by Megan Nielsen.  Sewn with fabric from Imagine Gnats.

The fabric I used is an organic cotton interlock from Imagine Gnats. It doesn’t look like it’s in stock anymore, but she’s got lots of other fabrics that would work great for this skirt, like this great Art Gallery knit if  you’re looking for a fun print (http://imaginegnats.com/shop/avantgarde-fluxus-ochre-knit/) or this cotton jersey (http://imaginegnats.com/shop/laguna-cotton-jersey-onyx/) available in several colors for a good basic. While the interlock worked for this skirt, you can see at the most stretched points that the white fibers are showing through the printed  black- so a printed interlock may not be the best choice. Still, I love this print!

I’ll be holding on to this pattern for any future pregnancies and definitely see it as a versatile staple piece for a maternity wardrobe!

Hello Holli wearing the Erin Maternity skirt by Megan Nielsen.  Sewn with fabric from Imagine Gnats.

Thank you so much Holli!  I don’t think I’ve ever seen a cuter pregnant lady, and I KNOW I’ve never seen a cuter maternity skirt!!  Everyone, be sure to visit Hello Holli for lots more beautiful sewing.

Be sure to enter the Rafflecopter widget below for a chance to win $50 to spend at Imagine Gnats and a PDF pattern from Megan Nielsen.

 

Also the Inlinkz is open for you to link up anything you’ve made in 2016 using fabric from Imagine Gnats, or any Megan Nielsen pattern!  We can’t wait to see what you’ve created using supplies from these fantastic sponsors.  And remember to use the discount code SKIRTS16 for 15% off at Megan Nielsen.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

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Axel Skirts {All The Skirts: Megan Nielsen & Imagine Gnats}

All 3 versions of Megan Nielsen Axel Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

All 3 versions of Megan Nielsen Axel Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

Megan Nielsen’s Axel skirt pattern is their newest released skirt pattern.  If you said it was their latest and greatest, you might be right!

All 3 versions of Megan Nielsen Axel Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

The special thing about the Axel Skirt pattern is that there are 3 versions.  But each of these views is so unique that it’s like getting 3 different patterns for the price of 1.  So of course I ended up sewing all 3 of the versions.

All 3 versions of Megan Nielsen Axel Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

The Axel Skirts are form fitting knit skirts with a variety of hem finishes.  They are very quick and easy to construct.  The patterns are illustrations, simple and easy to follow.  Both body measurements and finished garment measurements are given, and we suggest to look at both as well as the stretch of the knit fabric you will be using before cutting out your size.  These skirts are designed to be hip hugging, so if you are working with a less stretchy fabric you won’t be able to get it on if you don’t pay attention to this.  I won’t tell you which of the 3 skirts I spent hours ripping out the side seams and sewing them at 1/4 seam allowance instead of the 5/8 seam allowance allowed to get more room for hips!  (Hint: the one with the longest seams for the lady who’s birthed 7 children…)

All 3 versions of Megan Nielsen Axel Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

Let’s take a closer look at each view.  Version 1 has a handkerchief hem.  You can also even out the points and make a trumpet shaped skirt if desired.  I used brown ponte de roma for this skirt, purchased at JoAnn Fabrics.

All 3 versions of Megan Nielsen Axel Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

Version 2 is a knee length skirt with hip sashes.  Yes, I hacked this skirt into a maxi skirt because that’s what I love!  I used some jersey knit stripe fabric from Imagine Gnats, and right now it’s on sale for $4.50 per yard!   It’s quite thin, but worked beautifully for this skirt.  I wasn’t sure I was going to like the hip sashes, but I actually think they’re fun and remind me of the 90s when we would tie sweaters around our hips and think we looked so coooool!

All 3 versions of Megan Nielsen Axel Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

Version 3 is a midi length skirt with a slit that can be worn in either the front or the back.  Allegra loves this skirt and suggested she needs a leather jacket to go with it.  Hmmmm…  I used fabric from Cali Fabrics.  I don’t remember which fabric I purchased, but go check them out if you never have.  And here’s a way to get 10% off: Get 10% off  off your first purchase using my unique referral code: http://www.califabrics.com?redeem=NTczOTc2YjRiMDk3MTUwMzAwYjVhYTQ5

All 3 versions of Megan Nielsen Axel Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

So basically, we love the Axel Skirt and we’re pretty sure everyone can find a version they like of this skirt too!  Now it’s your turn to get involved with All The Skirts.  Be sure to enter the Rafflecopter widget below for a chance to win $50 to spend at Imagine Gnats and a PDF pattern from Megan Nielsen.

All 3 versions of Megan Nielsen Axel Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

Also the Inlinkz is open for you to link up anything you’ve made in 2016 using fabric from Imagine Gnats, or any Megan Nielsen pattern!  We can’t wait to see what you’ve created using supplies from these fantastic sponsors.  And remember to use the discount code SKIRTS16 for 15% off at Megan Nielsen.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

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Laila Skirt Review & Tips for Sewing a Translated Pattern

Zierstoff Laila skirt review by Skirt Fixation

Zierstoff Laila skirt review by Skirt Fixation

We had the opportunity to sew a Zierstoff pattern.  Zierstoff is a German pattern company who have recently started an English language branch with some of their popular patterns.  They asked us if we would like to try one in exchange for a review.  So of course we chose a skirt pattern as that is where we have the most experience!  They do have many other patterns as well that are worth a second look.

Zierstoff Laila skirt review by Skirt FixationWe decided to sew the Laila skirt pattern.  It is made for knit or stretchable fabrics.  There are 3 pattern pieces, the front/back piece, the side piece, and the waistband.  The Laila skirt has a neat, full shape.  The side pieces make it especially interesting.

Zierstoff Laila skirt review by Skirt FixationThere are only 3 pages of instructions, so the Laila skirt goes together fast and easy.  If you get stuck somewhere, you might try the Zierstoff YouTube channel.  They have video tutorials on everything from tiling your paper into a pattern to sewing a skirt.

Zierstoff Laila skirt review by Skirt FixationOne thing that was not included with our Laila skirt pattern was the size chart.  Before you begin sewing a Zierstoff pattern, you will need to know what size to make. The women’s size chart is located here.

Zierstoff Laila skirt review by Skirt FixationFor the fabric of the Laila skirt, we used some organic bamboo knit from Cali Fabrics.  It’s amazing fabric, and has just the right amount of structure for this skirt.  You can find some really good deals at Cali Fabrics.  Get 10% off off your first purchase by clicking through this link!

Zierstoff Laila skirt review by Skirt FixationSince sewing is a multicultural endeavor and patterns are made in every language and translated to other languages, we thought we’d share some tips for sewing with a translated pattern.

Use Common Sense

As just stated above, the act of sewing is mostly the same in every culture with some subtle variations. However the terminology & techniques might be slightly different. This doesn’t mean you don’t know how to sew, or the pattern maker didn’t know how to write/translate patterns, it just means you might have to figure out what exactly you are being instructed to do. For example, the side pieces on the Laila skirt need to be cut on the fold although the pattern does not state this anywhere. But we’ve sewn enough skirts before to know this instinctively. In another place, a word was translated as “topstitch” when it simply meant stitch.  (This has been changed now on the Laila skirt, but you get the idea!)

Ask For Help

If the pattern maker has translate their pattern to your mother tongue, it means they are trying pretty hard to reach a new audience, and will probably be very willing and eager to help you. We found this to be the case with Zierstoff, they had very prompt answers to our questions.

A Picture Is Worth 1000 Words

Because pictures are the same in every language, they don’t need translating! If you’ve ever sewn from a Japanese pattern book, you will find this especially true. The illustrations or photos are very detailed for this very reason: no translation required!

Read The Reviews

If others who speak your language have sewn the pattern you are trying to sew, it’s very likely they ran into the same things you did and might have written a review that will help you.

Just DO It!

At some point, you just have to decide to dive in or quit. But in our case, with Zierstoff, we found it to be totally worthwhile, and have a new skirt pattern to add to our library. You too may find a new favorite pattern by sewing up a pattern translated from a different language. We’ve seen many seamstresses who have!
Leave us a comment ~ have you ever sewn a pattern translated from a different language? Or in a different language? Do you have any more tips to add?

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Thread Faction’s Skirt #106 {Pattern Review}

Thread Faction #106 sewn by Skirt Fixation

Thread Faction #106 sewn by Skirt Fixation

Today we have the privilege of reviewing , a pattern by Thread Faction.  And not only that, we’re part of an super awesome blog tour where a bunch of Thread Faction patterns from their new SS2016 collection are being reviewed.  At the end of this post is a giveaway for 1 Thread Faction pattern, and a link to another Thread Faction giveaway you won’t want to miss, plus links to all the other bloggers on the tour.

Thread Faction #106 sewn by Skirt Fixation

Alright, back to Skirt #106.  This pattern will surely be sewn again, which is saying a lot, considering how many skirt pattern we are amassing!  The shape is awesome, which allows for super movement and flexibility.  Just check out this collage we made of Skirt #106 in action.

Thread Faction #106 sewn by Skirt Fixation

As if the movement in this skirt pattern wasn’t enough, there are shorts underneath, which is a must for any little girl.  Cartwheels, here we come!

Thread Faction #106 sewn by Skirt Fixation

Skirt #106 is a knit skirt pattern.  We used some of our hoarded Art Gallery Fabrics knit fabric from the limited edition Priory Square line.  Skirt #106 can be made in 9 sizes from 2-10.  The waistband is elastic, Annie’s preferred method.  Also, the waistband instructions teach you how to make it in a very professional, finished manner.  It’s really worth it, even though it’s a little more difficult and took us several tries and sessions with the seam ripper to get it exactly right.  We sewed a size 6 with added length beyond the size 10 lines.  This is because if this summer is anything like last summer, it will be about 6 inches shorter at the end of summer!  So, planning ahead.

Thread Faction #106 sewn by Skirt Fixation

Now it’s time for you to take a tour and see what everyone else has created using Thread Faction patterns.
26/5 Nap Time Creations Miss Castelinhos Swoodson Says Needles to say

27/5 Made By Sara Sew Not Perfect Hello Holli Whisk ’em

28/5 House of Estrela Made By Amanda Rose Max California Brave Fabrics

29/5 Create 3.5 Bless by Tone The College Seamstress

30/5 Ma Me Mi Mo Paisley Roots Skirt Fixation

31/5 Sew Very Rebel and Malice Call Ajaire

1/6 Better Dressed Child Buzzmills Handmade Frenzy

2/6 Lamb and ewe crafts All Things Beautiful Pen, Seb & Rox

Thread Faction SS2016 Blog Tour

a Rafflecopter giveaway

And be sure to go to the Thread Faction blog for the giveaway including these sponsors:

Thread Faction SS2016 Blog Tour Sponsors

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Union St. Tee Review

Union St. Tee sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

Union St. Tee sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

Perhaps you will think this blog post a little boring, but I’m pretty excited about this basic pattern.    This is the Hey June Handmade Union St Tee pattern.  Because I have a habit of making two Hey June Patterns at the same time (indecisive about which view to make!) I sewed up 2 Union St Tees, a v-neck and a scoop neck.

Union St. Tee sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

The Union St. Tee can be made in 9 sizes from XXS to 3X.  Besides the 2 different necklines, this tee can be made with 4 different sleeve lengths.  The illustrations are line drawings.  If you’ve never sewn with knits before, this pattern would be a great place to start.

Union St. Tee sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

The first Union St. Tee I made is the most boring, but the most exciting to me!  Before I sewed this shirt, I didn’t have a plain white tee.  I know!  Such a basic and such a huge hole in my wardrobe.  Problem fixed.  I sewed the scoop neck with elbow length sleeves.  The fabric is Riley Blake Designs basic white knit.  I still think the neckline could use a tad bit of work, but you better believe this one is going to be worn steady!  I forgot to make my standard wide shoulder adjustment, but it’s not too bad of a fit.  I will remember to do that next time, for sure.

Union St. Tee sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

The second Union St. Tee I made is the v-neck with short sleeves.  I had never sewed a v-neck before, and I got this one right on the first try.  I don’t think it was talent or luck, but another point for Adrianna, the designer of Hey June Handmade patterns.  She really is amazing!

Union St. Tee sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

For this v-neck I used club knit fabric from Raspberry Creek Fabrics.  It’s so soft and beautiful, and amazing.  I also forgot the wide shoulder adjustment on this one, and I think that is the cause of the pulling you can see above the chest.  Not like that’s going to keep me from wearing it, or anything!

Union St. Tee sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

The only change I made to this one was to raise the v-neck by 1 inch (and shorten the neckband accordingly) due to the fact that I bend up and down 100 million times a day (side effect of having 7 children) and I usually don’t have a free hand to keep my shirt from flopping open.

Union St. Tee sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

Sometimes it’s the simplest thing in life that satisfy us the most, and sewing up the Union St. Tee definitely fits that category.  Now leave me a comment…what satisfying thing have you done lately?