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How to Add Bra Cups to a Swimsuit

In preparation for the release of the Grace Tankini, we’ve been working on some tutorials to go along with the pattern.  Today’s post is all about bra cups.

The Grace Tankini has a shelf bra in both views.  Adding bra cups to the shelf bra gives more stability and support as well as modesty when wet.  First let’s talk about bra cups.

How to add bra cups to a swimsuit - a video tutorial from Skirt Fixation

Bra cups for swimwear come in all different types!  There are several different shapes including inverted u-shape, oval or teardrop.  There are as many different cup sizes as there are for regular bras, but A-DD are the most common.  Swimwear bra cups can be found in a molded poly foam or gel filled, both with a knit covering.  Also, bra cups can be found in white, black, or nude.  Bra cups with enhancing (push up) features can also be purchased.

In choosing what bra cups to use, you should look for a shape and size that matches your bust size and swim fabric.  Be sure the bra cups you purchase include the words “for swimwear” so you can be sure they will not retain water or be damaged by chlorine.

Where to Source Bra Cups for Swimwear

You can purchase bra cups online or in your local sewing store.  As of this post, bra cups cost between $6 and $15.  Some online sources include:

How to add bra cups to a swimsuit - a video tutorial from Skirt Fixation

JoAnn Fabrics Dritz Molded Foam Bra Cups

Amazon

Sew Sassy

Another tried and true method of sourcing bra cups for swimwear is to harvest them from an old or thrift store swimsuit!  They are much cheaper, and in season you can often buy a suit from the thrift store for a dollar or two.  If you source your bra cups from a swimsuit, you can be assured they are intended for swimwear and will hold up to chlorine and not retain water.

How to Add Bra Cups to a Swimsuit

Sewing bra cups in to the Grace Tankini (or any shelf bra swimsuit) is easy and rewarding.  Watch our video below to watch us sew bra cups into the Grace Tankini and listen for all our little tips along the way!

If you’re looking for more support than a shelf bra with sewn in bra cups offers, try this tutorial from Cashmerette.

Also, watch for a tutorial on how to make your bra cups removable, which is useful if you’ve purchased special/expensive inserts (i.e. mastectomy prosthesis) you want to use in several different suits.

Leave us your thoughts about bra cups in the comments below.

Affiliate links are used in this post.  If you click one of our affiliate links, we may make a few pennies at no extra cost to you.  We only like to really great produce we love and recommend!

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Sewing With Power Mesh

How to add power mesh to swimwear - a tutorial from Skirt Fixation

In preparation for the release of the Grace Tankini, we’ve been preparing a few tutorials for you.  Swimwear sewing is doable for the home sewist, and every tip and tutorial helps you achieve a more professional look.  Today we’re talking about power mesh.

How to add power mesh to swimwear - a tutorial from Skirt Fixation

Power mesh is a lightweight, sheer fabric used to add extra compression or support to swimwear.  The best power mesh fabric to use for swimwear is made from a nylon spandex blend, and has a 4 way stretch.  The amount of stretch varies, so you should look for power mesh with similar stretch properties to your main swim fabric and lining.

Speaking of lining, the most common application of power mesh is to add it to the wrong side of your lining.  Stay tuned for the tutorial below on just how to do that.  But power mesh can also be used in place of the lining altogether.

Why to Use Power Mesh:

Reasons you might want to add power mesh to your swimwear are: extra compression power, extend the life of your suit, and modesty if your main fabric is thin.  Keep in mind that the extra compression power may require you to go up a size when making your swimwear.  This is both because power mesh often has less stretch than regular swim fabric, and also because every layer of fabric you add to your suit can mean less stretch overall.

Power mesh is also often used as the briefs in men/boys swim trunks.   It comes in many different colors and even a few prints.  You should wash and dry your power mesh in the same way you plan to launder your finished suit.  For us that means a cold water wash and a line dry.

Power mesh usually costs between $3 and $15 per yard.  We’ve linked to some sources we recommend for power mesh below:
Power Mesh White Fabric  
from Fabric.com
Performance Fabric Power Mesh Tango Red   
from JoAnn Fabrics

Power Mesh from Amazon

Power Mesh from Peekaboo Pattern Shop

The Fabric Fairy 

Cali Fabrics

Mood Fabrics

Online Fabric Store has 16 different colors of power mesh

Stylish Fabrics

How to Use Power Mesh:

Now here’s a tutorial on how to add power mesh to your swimwear.  In this tutorial, the power mesh is nude colored, the lining is white, and the main swim fabric is red and white striped.

How to add power mesh to swimwear - a tutorial from Skirt Fixation

Step 1:
Just like all swim wear fabric and lining, power mesh is easer to cut flat instead of on the fold. Also, we find it easier to get a more accurate cut when using a rotary cutter rather than a scissors. When you have your power mesh cut out, pin it to the wrong side of your lining fabric. (If your lining doesn’t have a right or wrong side, just choose one!)

How to add power mesh to swimwear - a tutorial from Skirt Fixation

Step 2:
Baste the power mesh to the lining fabric inside the seam allowance (closer to the raw edges) around all sides of the pattern piece.

How to add power mesh to swimwear - a tutorial from Skirt Fixation

Here you can see the power mesh is now basted to the lining fabric.  Sometimes the basting causes the lining to curl up a little around the edges.  This is no biggie, and it will stop once you remove your basting stitches.

How to add power mesh to swimwear - a tutorial from Skirt Fixation

Above you can see the right side of the fabric now has a line of basting stitches close to the edge.

How to add power mesh to swimwear - a tutorial from Skirt Fixation

Step 3:
Pin your lining pattern pieces together as according to the pattern instructions, keeping in mind the power mesh is on the wrong side of the lining fabric.  Remember to use ballpoint pins so you don’t snag your fabric when sewing swimwear.

Step 4:
Sew your lining pieces together with a stretch stitch. You can see how this line of sewing is outside the 1st basted line of thread. After this step, remove your basting stitches if desired.

How to add power mesh to swimwear - a tutorial from Skirt Fixation

Step 5:
Finally, sew the lining to the main fabric as instructed. You can see the power mesh is sandwiched between the main fabric and the lining.

There you have it: how and why to use power mesh in your swimwear sewing.  Leave us your thoughts about power mesh below!

Affiliate links are used in this post.  If you click one of our affiliate links, we may make a few pennies at no extra cost to you.  We only like to really great produce we love and recommend!

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Embroidered Denim Skirt Knockoff {Buy or DIY ~ Skirt}

Embroidered Denim Skirt Knockoff by Skirt Fixation

It’s time for another Buy or DIY skirt! When we saw this beautiful embroidered denim skirt, we just had to check it out. But then we saw the price tag, and you might say we had a little sticker shock. But you know us, we just had to figure out a way to DIY this skirt!

Embroidered Denim Skirt Knockoff by Skirt Fixation

Embroidered Denim Skirt Knockoff Details:

Needle & Thread Wild Flower Embroidered Denim Skirt

Fabric Recommendation: Telio Denim Embroidered Single Border Floral Red/Turquoise/Pink Fabric

Pattern Recommendation: Alina Sewing Design Co. Chi-Town Chinos

Embroidered Denim Skirt Knockoff Math:

Needle & Thread Wild Flower Embroidered Denim Skirt: $400 retail price.
Fabric needed: 1.5 yards
Pattern: $15
Fabric: $10.98 per yard
Notions: $2.20 denim zipper
Total Cost: $33.67 for DIY
Total Savings: $366.33

Embroidered Denim Skirt Knockoff Summary:

Wow, the DIY wins again!! Are you seeing a pattern here? (See what we did there?!) So now we are totally in the mood to whip up an embroidered denim skirt…how about you?

Just a little FYI…affiliate links are used in this post.  This is so that we can support our blogging and fabric-holic tendency.  If you click on one of our links, we might make a few pennies at no extra cost to you.  You’ve been warned!

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Me Made May Week 4

Me Made May skirt outfits from Skirt Fixation

 

 

Wrapping up Me Made May today!  Some thoughts on the event and my wardrobe at the end of the pictures!

Me Made May Day 22:

This striped Jocole knit pencil skirt is super comfortable and it matches my gray Sante Fe top perfectly!  I wear both these a lot.

Day 22 Verdict:

Me Made May skirt outfits from Skirt Fixation

Perfect outfit for summer months!  Everyone needs a Sante Fe top!  And this pattern is on SALE for 15% off right now with the code SANTEFE15

Me Made May Day 23:

This was the very first v-neck Union Street Tee I made.  Well, the very 1st any v-neck tee I made!  And I love it!

Day 23 Verdict:

Me Made May skirt outfits from Skirt Fixation

Love this shirt, here’s my review of the pattern.

Me Made May Day 24:

Me Made May skirt outfits from Skirt Fixation

I sewed up the Wildflower Top from Blank Slate Patterns and even modified it to become nursing friendly.

Day 24 Verdict:

Me Made May skirt outfits from Skirt Fixation

Unfortunately, this version didn’t work!  Bur I think with some changes I could get this to work out.  It would be such a good shirt for nursing!

Me Made May Day 25:

I wore my Jocole Peplum Top.  This version was originally my wearable muslin.

Day 25 Verdict:

Me Made May skirt outfits from Skirt Fixation

As with the other peplum top I wore this week, my waistline is not quite back to normal right now, and I’m going to keep blaming it on having a baby for several more months!

Me Made May Day 26:

https://www.instagram.com/p/BUjiWXmh9hS/?taken-by=skirtfixation

This is my favorite skirt refashion ever!  And my black Lane Raglan  that I still wear ALL THE TIME!

Day 26 Verdict:

Me Made May skirt outfits from Skirt Fixation

These two are in constant rotation!

Me Made May Day 27:

This navy blue Seafarer Top I made (unblogged) goes with just about everything in my skirt wardrobe!  And this skirt is reviewed here.

Day 27 Verdict:

Me Made May skirt outfits from Skirt Fixation

Mr. Skirt Fixation just purged his closet again…I think it’s time to make another one of these skirts!

Me Made May Day 28:

I love this Cheyenne Tunic in Art Gallery Fabrics voile so much!  And this Syrah skirt is dreamy too!

Day 28 Verdict:

Me Made May skirt outfits from Skirt Fixation

I’m pretty sure that if these two garments ever wear out I’ll just make exact replicas so I can always wear them!

Me Made May Day 29:

https://www.instagram.com/p/BUreKidBUiB/?taken-by=skirtfixation

This Sante Fe top  was the 2nd one I made.  And I wore it with my Jocole yoga A-line skirt.

Day 29 Verdict:

Me Made May skirt outfits from Skirt Fixation

The fabric I used for this shirt was closeout from Hancock Fabrics, and it doesn’t have good recovery.  This shirt gets pretty stretched out.

Me Made May Day 30:

https://www.instagram.com/p/BUuBtvahIa5/?taken-by=skirtfixation

My new Seafarer top (again!!!) and a refashioned skirt from several years ago.

Day 30 Verdict:

Me Made May skirt outfits from Skirt Fixation

When it’s good, it’s good!

Me Made May Day 31:

https://www.instagram.com/p/BUxCdndBb94/?taken-by=skirtfixation

A brand new Syrah Skirt (blog post coming soon!) made from this fantastic shibori dyed knit fabric from JoAnn (affiliate link) and (surprise, surprise) that same navy Seafarer!

Day 31 Verdict:

Me Made May skirt outfits from Skirt Fixation

What I learned from Me Made May 2017:

I need to replace quite a few of the garments I made when I was learning to sew knits.

I need to sew with more solid colors more so I can pair things better.

I’m actually running short on Me Made skirts!

I need to find(or draft?) a good denim skirt pattern.

Do you have any suggestions for my “Me Made” wardrobe?

Affiliate links are used in this post.  If you click on them we might make a few pennies at no extra cost to you.  You know, so we can afford more fabric and patterns and keep this blog running!

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Grace Tankini Tester Call

Grace Tankini by Savvy Patterns

For almost 1 year I’ve been working on my next pattern, and today I’m finally calling for testers to help get the Grace Tankini ready for sale!  It’s a really exciting day, and I’m so glad for everyone’s help.

Grace Tankini by Savvy Patterns

The Grace Tankini is a vintage inspired swimsuit with lots of options.  View A contains a circle skirt and a top with a playful circle in the back.  View B has ruched center areas which are customizable to flatter your figure.  The sporty bottoms can be made with or without matching ruching.  You can mix and match the 2 tops with 4 bottom options.  Include the 2 perfectly sized patch pockets to keep things stored while you swim.  The secure card pocket can be added to any of the bottoms.  Both top views include a shelf bra.  The Grace Tankini is the ultimate feminine swimsuit.  Whether you’re looking for a suit with more coverage due to modesty or skin sensitivity or some other reason, the Grace Tankini is the swimsuit for you!

Testers will be notified by email by May 30.  You will have 1 week to source fabric (I know not everyone has swimsuit fabric laying around!)  and the test will begin June 5.  If you can fulfill those time requirements, please fill out the tester form below.

Don’t think you can sew swimwear, or need some inspiration?  Right now there’s a swimwear tour filled with all things swimwear sewing.  Check it out:

Hosted by Sew Sophie Lynn & Paisley Roots
Pear Berry Lane / Inspinration / It’s Liesel / Sewing For Four
Harper Lu / Call Ajaire / Stylin Stacy / Skirt Fixation
Sewing By Ti / Sewing With Sarah / Sew & TellMe Made
Made By Melli / Life Sew Savory / That’s What She Crafted / Auschick
Rebel & Malice / EYMM / Stitching & Making / Lilliepawillie

And like any great blog tour there is a giveaway hosted by these sponsors:

We’re going to be giving away a Grace Tankini pattern!  Get all the details here.

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The Fabric Scrooge & A Skirt Sale!

Fabric Scrooge tips from Skirt Fixation

We’ve just couldn’t miss telling you about a fantastic skirt sale!

Skipalong Skort sewn by Skirt Fixation

This fantastic little skirt, The Skipalong Skort is on sale for 50% off today only at Peekaboo Pattern Shop.  But that’s not all:

The Skyline Skort pattern by Peekaboo Pattern Shop, sewn by Skirtfixation using fabric from The Fabric Fairy

The Skyline Skort by Peekaboo Pattern Shop is also on sale for 50% off today only too!  AND:

If you buy them bundled together, you can save an additional $2 with the code SKORT ~ Which means you get 2 amazing skirt patterns, both with shorts underneath and pockets, for only $7 which is a crazy good deal!  We’ve made both these skirt patterns over and over and over again!

Fabric Scrooge tips from Skirt Fixation

Also, we’re over at the CaliFabrics blog today sharing how you can save money on fabric with all of our Fabric Scrooge tips for using less!  See you there…

 

Affiliate links are used in this post to really great patterns!  If you use our links, we might make a couple of pennies at no extra cost to you.

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Willamette Shirt Review

Willamette Shirt sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

Yesterday Adrianna Appl of Hey June Handmade released the Willamette Shirt.  It’s a boxy dolman popover shirt with several different options for sewing.  I made view A with sleeve cuffs.  There are also options for a cropped version or one with a waist seam and color blocking options.

Willamette Shirt sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

The Willamette Shirt can be made in 11 sizes from 2 to 22.  It has a boxy silhouette, which means it goes straight from the waist to the hem.  In other words, totally kind and complimentary to a body that’s birthed 8 babies…one as recent as 2 months ago!

Willamette Shirt sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

This pattern is a great one for an advanced beginner seamstress looking for an entry pattern into sewing woven button up shirts.  I love the Cheyenne Tunic pattern, and will continue to sew it over and over again!  But the new Willamette Shirt is a lot faster to sew…I made this one in one afternoon.  The plackets are actually facing, and the collar is one piece sandwiched between the yoke and the front, so much easier to construct.  You don’t even have to make the button and button hole, you can just sew the placket shut up higher, like I did.

Willamette Shirt sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

I love the pleat in the back (which is hard to see in this photo.)  I made the inverted pleat, but there are 2 other types of pleats you could make there too…all completely detailed in the pattern, of course!

Willamette Shirt sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

 

For the fabric, I used some Robert Kaufman lawn designed by Liesl Gibson (of Oliver + S.)  I had hoarded it for a while, and only had 2 yards.  The Willamette Shirt fabric requirements is 3 yards, but I managed to get this one from 2 yards with a tiny little pile of scraps left, as I shared in my Instagram Story!  (For reference, I made a size 8…it probably could not be done in much larger sizes.)  This lawn is very lightweight and drapey and works great to give some movement to this boxy top.  I used the navy blue color way which is mostly sold out, but Kaufman Woodland Clearing Birds in Branches Coral Fabric is still available.

Willamette Shirt sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

I sewed the Willamette Shirt without making a muslin with NO alterations to the pattern!  Normally this would be a pretty dumb thing to do, but since I’ve sewn so many Hey June patterns and am familiar with the way they fit, I was comfortable in doing that.  Usually I do add width to the shoulders of my Hey June patterns, but because this pattern has dolman sleeves, that wasn’t necessary either!

Willamette Shirt sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

One reason I sew any Hey June pattern I can is because I always learn something new from them.  For this pattern, it was the genius way the facing is constructed together with the yoke and collar.  At one point I was pretty sure I was going to have to unpick the whole thing, but kept going according to the instructions, and never had to undo and redo anything!

Willamette Shirt sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

If you get your copy of the Willamette Shirt right now, it’s on sale!  I can assure you it’s worth it.

Affiliate links are used in this blog post for some amazing products.  Just so you are forewarned, if you click on one of our affiliate links, we just might make a few pennies at no extra cost to you!

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Me Made May Week 1

Just like last year, I’m participating in Me Made May.  As a refresher, Me Made May is an event where people who sew their clothes wear them for the month of May.  Everyone personalizes it to what works for them, and I’m doing the same.  This year I’m using the Me Made May event to assess my wardrobe, looking for handmade gaps and to determine what I wear and don’t wear and why.  Then I’ll summon up the courage to get rid of the things that don’t work…even though I made them!  For some reason I have a really hard time getting rid of garments I made.  I’ll summarize each week here, and let you know how it goes.

Me Made May Day 1:

https://www.instagram.com/p/BTjVdtCBv82/?taken-by=skirtfixation

Day 1 verdict:

This is the Marlene Shirt and the nursing modification works really good!  But I’ll probably use it on a different shirt in the future, or lower the armscyle on this shirt if I make another one.

Me Made May Day 2:

https://www.instagram.com/p/BTlyHqrhbTB/?taken-by=skirtfixation

Day 2 verdict:  This Santa Fe top is a keeper!  And the Jocole a line yoga skirt works great too.

Me Made May Day 3:

Day 3 verdict:

This Lonetree Vest is absolutely amazing!  I don’t think I’ll ever get rid of it, since I used top quality Art Gallery Fabrics canvas and made 3 muslins before sewing it up so the fit is perfect.  This ombre Syrah Skirt is one of my absolute favorites too.  I just need to repair the hem.  My double needle and I are not good friends right now!

Me Made May Day 4:

Day 4 verdict:

The Mountain Pose Yoga Pants need repairs, for some reason my machine has a little trouble sewing the knit stitch in long continuous lines…and starts to skip after a while.  The Jocole pencil skirt and Halifax Hoodie are always in constant rotation and good shape!

Me Made May Day 5:

Day 5 verdict:

I really do like the collar of this Parisian top and it’s shape, but it’s old, pilling and the collar is off center.  So I might make this pattern again, and pay special attention to collar placement, use better fabric, and lower the arm cycle and widen the shoulders a bit.  I’ve got a couple other cardigans, and only a few things to wear this Julia Cardigan with, so it’s going to have to go.

I’m also posting pictures of my kids wearing handmades every day over on Instagram, so if you want to see it as it happens, follow us on Instagram!  Here’s what my kids wore this week:

Day 1:

I spy 2 barefoot knights in #mommadeclothes for #mommmay and #minimemademay !!! . . #knighthoodie #parachutesweatpants

A post shared by Skirt Fixation (@skirtfixation) on

Day 2:

https://www.instagram.com/p/BTmmUqhFED7/?taken-by=skirtfixation

Day 3:

Day 4:

Day 5:

https://www.instagram.com/p/BTuV_A2B0Tb/?taken-by=skirtfixation

There you have it!  See you next week…

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Amnesty April {Project Sew It}

Project Sew it - Amnesty April sewn by Skirt Fixation

Hello there, we’re back again with Project Sew It’s April Challenge: Dress.  (Project Sew It is a monthly inspirational sewing challenge created by Celina of Petit a Petit and Family.)  Aria and Audrey both sewed up a garment for this month’s challenge.  But not a dress.

Project Sew it - Amnesty April sewn by Skirt Fixation

We’ve given ourselves amnesty on the given garment theme for the month of April because both of us needed a different garment than a dress in our wardrobes.  And frankly, we’re both a little scared of sewing up dresses.  But later in the year there is another dress challenge, so we’ll see how we do then!

Audrey’s Amnesty April Santa Fe Top

Project Sew it - Amnesty April sewn by Skirt Fixation

The Santa Fe top by Hey June Handmade is one of my current favorite patterns.  I made 2 of these tops and wore them the first 4 months of my pregnancy almost exclusively!  And now in my postpartum body, I’m in my super comfortable, almost flattering, lovable Santa Fe tops again.  So I decided to give the 2 I made last fall a little help by sewing up another.  This time I sewed up view F with the adorable contrast sleeve inserts.

Project Sew it - Amnesty April sewn by Skirt Fixation

I made just a few changes due to personal preference.  First of all, I went down 1 size.  I do feel my other Sante Fe Tops are a little on the big side even thought the pattern is intended to get a loose fit.  And secondly, the fabric I was using has a huge stretch, and sizing down is a good idea.  I raised the neckline in the front by 1 inch.  And I also made a neck band rather than a neck binding, just for fun.  I also lengthened the sleeves out to the length of the largest size.

Project Sew it - Amnesty April sewn by Skirt Fixation

The chocolate swirl fabric is a brushed poly, which is all the current rage in the sewing community for good reason!  This is a little different than the double brushed poly I used for my Mountain Pose Pants, and my machine really struggled to sew the side seams where it was 2 layers of the brushed poly together.  Where the sleeve fabric and the brushed poly fabric are sewn together, my machine did fine.  If I had a serger, I’m sure it could handle brushed poly fabric just fine, or at least that’s what I’m telling myself because I don’t have one!

Project Sew it - Amnesty April sewn by Skirt Fixation

You can find the chocolate swirl fabric at Girl Charlee.  The solid brown is from JoAnn Fabrics, I was leery of matching the shade of brown on a computer screen, so took the fabric in hand to the store to match.  Which led to several other fabric purchases…oops!  Anyway I absolutely LOVE this Santa Fe top, and no one can see the inside where it looks like the bobbin threw up on my fabric because apparently my machine was sick of sewing this brushed poly!  I also left it unhemmed so as not to give my sewing machine a worse case of the flu, or whatever was it’s problem!

Aria’s Amnesty April Seattle Skater Skirt

Project Sew it - Amnesty April sewn by Skirt Fixation

After Allegra no longer wanted or needed the Seattle Skater Skirt Mom made for her she passed it down to me, and I left it in the closet and forgot about it because it was too big in the hips!  I recently discovered that it fit me though, and have been wearing it a lot (because POCKETS!), so when this month’s challenge came, because I really don’t wear dresses, or like to wear them that much, I decided a skirt was what I needed most, and I picked the Seattle Skater Skirt.  First because it was easy, second because it was a circle, and third because it has pockets!

Project Sew it - Amnesty April sewn by Skirt Fixation

As I was looking at the sizes, fabric choices, etc. I discovered that the Seattle skirt can be made with a woven fabric! (Funny the things you can learn when you read stuff properly…)  Of course you still have to use knit fabric for the waistband.  I went with this nice fabric that has purple embroidered flowers on it from our stash!  It happens to match the top I made for the February challenge perfectly!

Project Sew it - Amnesty April sewn by Skirt Fixation

This skirt was super fun to make, and the only change I had to make was to adjust the circle to a little less than a circle because I wanted to add length to the skirt (I’m almost as tall as Mom now!) and the fabric wasn’t wide enough to make a full circle.  So it’s about 2 inches short of a full circle, still very full, and longer too.  It still has a nice spin to it though.

Project Sew it - Amnesty April sewn by Skirt Fixation

Anyway, I had a lot of fun making this Seattle Skater Skirt, it went really fast, and I didn’t have to unpick anything!  I plan on wearing this a lot, and I’m happy to have a new addition to my wardrobe.

We’ll see you later for next month’s Project Sew It.  We’ll just say we are excited about the theme and won’t be taking another amnesty month!

Affiliate links are used in this post because these are products we use and love.  And we think you should try them too!  So if you click on one of our affiliate links, we just might make a penny or two.  Consider yourself warned!

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Bellah Shirt

Bellah shirt pattern sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

We had the privilege of sewing up another German sewing pattern.  This time it was the Bellah by Prulla.  But don’t worry, this pattern is once again available translated to English in the Naeh Connection shop.

Bellah shirt pattern sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

Bellah is a loose, casual shirt, made from lightweight fabrics.  The pattern is defined by some pleats at the shoulders.  I didn’t sew the pleats exactly the way the pattern recommends, but ended up with a very nice blouse anyway.

Bellah can be sewn in 7 different sizes from 34 to 46.  Those are European sizes, so if you don’t know your size, you choose one from the finished garment measurement chart included in the pattern.  I made size 36.

Bellah shirt pattern sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

I love that this pattern includes the intended height (5’8”) it was designed for.  This is always helpful for someone tall like me.  Then I know exactly what I need to do to make it work for my 6’ tall frame.  This time, I only added an inch to the length, and nothing to the shoulders.  I usually widen a pattern at the shoulders for my broad shoulders, and probably should have this time, but it’s wearable as is.

I made the 3/4 length sleeves.  There is elastic at the end of the sleeves, another nice feature.  This means if you push the sleeves up, they will stay and not keep slipping down!  Always nice for a busy mother who needs every extra hand she can get!.

Bellah shirt pattern sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

About those pleats; I closed the pleats like you do on a skirt.  When I was editing the photos, I realized something was not quite right about them, and went back and read the pattern instructions again.  Sure enough, I had messed up, they are supposed to be open, allowing for a little more detail at the shoulders.  But with the busy-ness of the fabric, I don’t think it’s too noticeable.

That fabric is some very lightweight fabric (crinkle chiffon?) that was in my stash.  It’s very pretty with shades of grey and blue throughout.  Since it is so sheer, I’m layering it over a black tank in these photos.  It is perfect for summer and into fall layered with a cardigan.

Bellah shirt pattern sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

The Bellah pattern is pretty easy to sew, I did it in one afternoon, even with a nursing newborn baby!  There are only 5 pieces.  I did take time to finish all the edges of this lightweight fabric with a zigzag stitch to preserve it longer.  And ever though I added length, I only sewed a tiny rolled hem instead of the deeper hem the pattern suggested.  You can make it even faster if you choose the option to eliminate the buttons and buttonholes.

This is a nice pattern for a faster, casual woven shirt.  If you’d like to sew a Bellah shirt, you can find it here in the Naeh Connection Shop.