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Striped Matching Girls Dresses

Matching striped girls dresses DIY by Skirt Fixation

A while back I saw a friend of mine wearing a reverse stripe shirt.  Actually, I’m just calling it that…none of the Google search terms I entered brought up a shirt like the one she was wearing.  The body of the shirt was white with black stripes and the sleeves were black with white stripes.  I really liked it, so I kept my eye out for two fabrics to use that I could recreate her shirt and make my daughters striped matching girls dresses.

Matching striped girls dresses DIY by Skirt Fixation

When I saw this taupe and off-white striped modal jersey fabric from CaliFabrics, I immediately thought of another fabric in my stash that would work with it to recreate my friend’s shirt.  It was a cocoa with white stripes in jersey knit fabric. Striped matching girls dresses, here we come!

Matching striped girls dresses DIY by Skirt Fixation

It turns out the two fabric aren’t exactly perfectly matched, because one has white stripes and the other is on the off-white background.  But the taupes are the same color, or close enough, so I went ahead with my plan.  

Matching striped girls dresses DIY by Skirt Fixation

I had enough fabric to make maxi dresses for my two youngest daughters.  For my older daughter, I used the Uptown Downtown Dress by Sew Straight Patterns.  For the younger daughter, I used the Janie Dress

Matching striped girls dresses DIY by Skirt Fixation

Both of these dress patterns have a wide enough size range to fit both of my daughters, but I already had each of these patterns in the right sizes, and was in a hurry to execute my plan of making striped matching girls dresses!

Matching striped girls dresses DIY by Skirt Fixation

For Annie’s dress, I used the cocoa with white stripes for the main body of the dress, and the off-white with taupe stripes for the sleeves, neckband and pockets. 

Matching striped girls dresses DIY by Skirt Fixation

For baby Tina’s dress, I used the off-white with taupe stripes for the body of the dress, and the cocoa with white stripes for the sleeves and neckband.  Both fabrics are super soft, great quality, and haven’t pilled with lots of washing and wear!

Matching striped girls dresses DIY by Skirt Fixation

The girls love their matching-but-not-too-matching dresses.  The effect is very fun and gets a lot of double takes!  These dresses will be great in summer and with the maxi length, they should be able to wear them all summer too.

Matching striped girls dresses DIY by Skirt Fixation

It would probably be easiest to match colors by buying both fabrics from the same source, or in a brick and mortar shop.  Another idea is to get black and white & white and black stripes because there wouldn’t be as much variation. Or a third idea is to buy both fabrics from the same manufacturer, like Art Gallery Fabrics. They have some very nice stripes of all color and sizes in their super soft knit fabric!


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Tip Top Tunic Review

When I was sewing up the capsule wardrobe for Baby before he was born and before we knew if he was a boy or a girl, I decided to sew up a dress or two…just in case he was a girl.  I used the Tip Top Tunic and Dress pattern for one of these.  Well, he was not a boy, so I had this dress.  

Lucky for Tina, even though I had made the smallest size of this pattern (6-12 months) the ease is quite generous, and Tina is petite enough to wear it as a tunic.  She loves the swishy double sleeves, and delights in the feel of the soft voile.

As with all patterns by Petit a Petit & Family, this one is very easy and fun to put together.  The instructions are easy to follow with drawn illustrations.  The sleeves are a fun shape, and that is accentuated by doubling them and making the different colors.

You might recognize the fabric, it’s leftover from making this skirt.  I didn’t quite have enough and had to piece the back.  But it’s not really noticeable unless you’re looking for it, like me!  It’s voile from Art Gallery Fabrics, and really good quality and easy to work with.

For the sleeves, we used a lightweight tencel twill in pink, and a white shirting used in my Key Largo Top.  They are lightweight fabrics and this is imperative to getting good drape on the fluttery sleeves.  The effect would not be the same with a stiff fabric.

Because the neckline is elastic all around, it make this still wearable for Tina even though she just turned two.  She is really fun to dress because she will wear almost anything if you exclaim about how pretty/nice/fun/happy/etc. in it!  She’s very verbal for a new 2 year old and it’s super delightful to interact with her!

The pictures in this post aren’t perfectly posed, the dress is a bit wrinkled, but the expressions on Tina’s face are purely who she is in a nutshell!  Every single one of them!  

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DIY Baby Sweater Dress

DIY baby sweater dress, a how to tutorial from Skirt Fixation

Before totally warm weather hits, we need to share this baby sweater dress we sewed for Baby Tina!  

DIY baby sweater dress, a how to tutorial from Skirt Fixation

There was a little fabric left over from making the sweater in my Make 9 outfit #1, and I had a baby sweater dress on the brain!  If there’s anything cuter than a baby girl in a sweater dress, I sure can’t think of what it might be!

I used some fabric from my stash, but this fabric is the same, but in grey.  Or this fabric is almost identical in color.  Really, any sweater fabric would be cute, right?

DIY baby sweater dress, a how to tutorial from Skirt Fixation

We used the Janie Dress pattern. Again.  It’s just that good!  It’s comfortable, and we have the pattern cut out in Tina’s size already, so…

DIY baby sweater dress, a how to tutorial from Skirt Fixation

As we did on the robin’s egg blue dress, we used a vintage linen napkin for the collar.  It adds such a sweet touch, and the little blue flower matches the sweater fabric perfectly.  

I actually didn’t have quite enough fabric to cut out this Janie Dress.  The circle skirt takes up quite a little space, but I still wanted to make it work.  So I cut out the front and back bodice pieces not on a fold, and so they each have a seam down the middle.  In the back this looks perfectly natural, but in the front I wanted to hide it.  

DIY baby sweater dress, a how to tutorial from Skirt Fixation

After puzzling over a solution for some time, I decided to use the edges of the vintage napkin (so they were already hemmed!) and create a ruffle down the front of the dress.  When you first looked at it, did you know that cute ruffle is really there to hide a seam?

DIY baby sweater dress, a how to tutorial from Skirt Fixation

You can just barely see the seam in the back of the bodice in this photo where her sisters were trying to teach Baby Tina to twirl.  A vital skill every girl wearing a circle skirt should know, right?

DIY baby sweater dress, a how to tutorial from Skirt Fixation

A baby sweater dress could also probably be refashioned from a thrifted sweater too, don’t you think?  I mean, something this cute deserves to be sewn at every possible chance, right?

Affiliate links are used in this post.  If you click on them, we might make a small commission for referring you.  Thank you for supporting our small sewing business!

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Newborn Capsule Wardrobe

Newborn capsule wardrobe sewn by Skirt Fixation

Recently we welcomed a baby boy to our family! Today I’m sharing the capsule wardrobe for a baby boy that I sewed before he was born. Actually, since we didn’t know if he was a boy or a girl, this could also be a gender neutral newborn capsule wardrobe.

Newborn capsule wardrobe sewn by Skirt Fixation

As I did last time I created a newborn capsule wardrobe, I choose a color palette to work with first. This time I chose grey and white with some green and turquoise blue thrown in. I had some owl jersey fabric from Raspberry Creek Fabrics that I had been holding on to for just the right use, and so pulled the colors from that.

Newborn capsule wardrobe sewn by Skirt Fixation

These are the items I sewed: 4 baby hats using the free pattern and tutorial from Sweet Red Poppy.

Newborn capsule wardrobe sewn by Skirt Fixation

4 gowns using the free pattern from Stitched Together. You can read more about the grey and white striped fabric over at CaliFabrics and the reasons why I like to use the fabrics I chose for a newborn capsule wardrobe.

Newborn capsule wardrobe sewn by Skirt Fixation

3 knit swaddle blankets. Here is my free tutorial for different types and sizes of swaddle blankets and how to sew each kind. (It’s about the easiest sewing there is!)

Newborn capsule wardrobe sewn by Skirt Fixation

4 pairs of footed baby pants using the free pattern from Sew Much Ado. The green leaf fabric is from Art Gallery Fabrics, so super soft and snuggly!

Newborn capsule wardrobe sewn by Skirt Fixation

The fabric in this pair is also from Art Gallery Fabrics, and pairs well with the rest of the items in the newborn capsule wardrobe.

Newborn capsule wardrobe sewn by Skirt Fixation

Besides 6 new plain white onesies (see the reason for this here) I used the Rosemary Raglan pattern to sew up a couple of little shirts. For the raglan sleeves on one of them, I just used the back side of the fabric, and it’s a perfect match!

Newborn capsule wardrobe sewn by Skirt Fixation

Of course a sweater was in order…and so we pulled out some scraps of french terry and used the Brindlle & Twig Grandpa Cardigan pattern. If you’ve been around Skirt Fixation for a while, you’ll recognize most of these fabrics as scraps leftover from other projects…that’s the beauty of sewing for a baby!

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Up Beet Tee & Turnip Up Trousers

Up Beet Tee & Dress pattern sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

Today the patterns we’re featuring are the Up Beet Tee & Dress and Turnip Up Trousers & Shorts.  These patterns were designed by Celina of Petit a Petit & Family for the Project Run & Play capsule wardrobe collection called Project Farmer’s Market.    Read about the D’Anjou Dress from this capsule wardrobe collection here. Read about the Banana Boat Tee and Soleil Skirt in this post. Read about the Jonagold Jumper from this collection here.

Up Beet Tee & Dress pattern sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

First of all, we sewed up an outfit for Lowell using these patterns.  Let’s start with the Up Beet Tee we sewed for him.  Now before getting started, we really must say the it’s almost impossible to describe the amazing genius of this pattern.  It’s a raglan tee in back but a plain tee in front. 

Up Beet Tee & Dress pattern sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

To achieve this look, the sleeve piece looks like a jig saw puzzle piece, but it goes together like a dream!  Seriously, you just have to sew this pattern to truly appreciate it’s genius.  

Up Beet Tee & Dress pattern sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

For the fabric I used striped mustard and white french terry fabric from Raspberry Creek Fabrics.  This was to be able to show off the fantastic lines of the pattern from the back!  And you can see we snuck in some blueberry fabric for a pocket to keep with the Farmer’s Market theme.

Jonagold Jumper sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation for Project Farmer's Market

The neck, sleeves and hem are all finished with a binding, and the pattern has instructions on how to make this either hidden or exposed.  On Lowell’s shirt we made the neck and sleeves exposed for a pop of navy blue color, but make the hem band hidden.

Up Beet Tee & Dress pattern sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

While we’re on the topic of the Up Beet Tee & Dress pattern, of course we had to make the dress version too after we discovered how fun and easy it was to sew!  The dress has a cocoon shape, and gathering at the front shoulders and across the back to make it feminine. 

Up Beet Tee & Dress pattern sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

For Tina’s 1st Up Beet Dress, I used fabric from Art Gallery Fabrics Line Drawings Bluing (leftover from this skirt) for the main fabric and a pop of yellow triangle fabric for the bindings.  I’m totally in love with this dress, and she is too.  

Up Beet Tee & Dress pattern sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

Oh and pockets!  I forgot to mention the pockets which Tina L.O.V.E.S.  It was seriously challenging to get her to take her hands out of the pockets for pictures!  I feel that way about pockets too, baby! We made the size 2 for her with 3/4 length sleeves.  The sleeves are a bit longer than than for her right now, but at the rate my kids arms grow, they won’t be for long!  The sleeves can also be made elbow length, or with a cap sleeve.

Up Beet Tee & Dress pattern sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

And of course we couldn’t stop at just one Up Beet Dress…so we made two!  For the 2nd one, we used some Raspberry Creek Fabric knit leftover from this dress.  On this one, we used some hot pink jersey for the neck binding and made the hem binding hidden.  

Up Beet Tee & Dress pattern sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

I didn’t get a photo of the back, but the stripes show off the lines of the raglan sleeves on this dress too.  Also, the high-low hem of this dress is adorable!!!

Up Beet Tee & Dress pattern sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

Suffice it to say Tina loves this dress too, and wears one of the other several times per week!

Turnip Up Trousers & Shorts sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

And the final garment we sewed is the Turnip Up Trousers & Shorts for Lowell.  I don’t know if there’s a more perfect pair of pants for this guy.  It’s almost like they were designed for him!  You see, he insists on rolling up the hems of any pair of pants he wear!  And that’s the way the Turnip Up Pants are designed!  (Did you see the banana fabric we snuck in for the Hong Kong seam bindings?

Turnip Up Trousers & Shorts sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

Other features that make these pants perfect for this boy are double reinforced patches on the knees, pockets, and the knit waistband (hello comfort!)  

Project Farmer's Market patterns sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

For the main fabric, we used a light blue denim from our stash.  You can find similar fabric here.  And a similar banana fabric can be found here. I love the way he’s standing in the above photo, don’t you?

Up Beet Tee & Dress pattern sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

We’d encourage everyone to grab these patterns and sew them up just to increase your sewing prowess!  Seriously, the construction of these patterns will delight you. 

Find the Up Beet Tee & Dresshere in the Project Run & Play shop.

Find the Turnip Up Trousers & Shorts here in the Project Run & Play shop.

Find the whole Project Farmer’s Market collection here in the shop.  (Save over 30%!!!)

Find the unisex mini collection here in the shop.  (Save over 25%!!!)

Find the girls mini collection here in the shop.  (Save over 25%!!!)

Enjoy viewing the Project Farmer’s Market lookbook here.

All greenhouse photos by Carrie of Beri Bee Designs. Affiliate links are used in this post to patterns and fabric we use and love. If you purchse soem of these products by clicking through our links, we might make a few extra pennies at no extra cost to you. Thank you for supporting our small business!

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D’Anjou Dress from Project Farmer’s Market

D'anjou Dress from Project Farmer's Market sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

Last week we showed you the Rosemary & Thyme Shirts pattern we contributed to the Project Farmer’s Market capsule wardrobe collection. Today we’re going to begin sharing some of the other patterns we sewed from the collection, starting with the D’Anjou Dress.

The D’anjou Dress is part of the Project Farmer’s Market capsule wardrobe collection.  I sewed it up for our Diggin’ Our Garden Thyme photoshoot for the lookbook.  All photos in the greenhouse are taken by my friend Carrie of Beri Bee Designs.

D'anjou Dress from Project Farmer's Market sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

The D’anjou Dress can be made in sizes 18M – 10.  For Tina I made the size 18M.  It’s generously long on her, so will hopefully last all summer!  For options, I included the underskirt, and made the overskirt with tucks.  

D'anjou Dress from Project Farmer's Market sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

The straps are functional (they button and unbutton) and there is an invisible zipper to help get in and out of the dress.  Of course I had to use wooden buttons…I used them throughout the whole collection, so keep your eyes out for them! The installation instructions on this invisible zipper are 100% helpful, and you should get a beautiful zipper every time.

D'anjou Dress from Project Farmer's Market sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

As you can see, I had fun playing with the directionality of the fabric and the fold over pocket piece.  It was just too perfect to play with the triangles and the pocket fabric!

D'anjou Dress from Project Farmer's Market sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

Speaking of fabric, the D’anjou overskirt is made using some Alison Glass fabric we’ve had in our stash for a long time.  It’s no longer available in the larger fabric shops, but you may be able to find it in a smaller shop on Etsy or perhaps your local quilt shop.  It’s called Geese in Ocean from the Handcrafted line by Alison Glass for Andover Fabrics.  Here is another gorgeous hand dyed fabric by Alison Glass with a similar color scheme.  

D'anjou Dress from Project Farmer's Market sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

For the underskirt and pocket contrast, we used some shot cotton similar to this one.  It adds a nice color pop at the bottom of the dress.  Some others who sewed the D’anjou Dress used contrasting colors for the underskirt, and that’s really fun too!

Underneath the D’anjou Dress, Tina is wearing a Rosemary Shirt.  We’ll talk more about all the Rosemary and Thyme Shirts we sewed another day.  

D'anjou Dress from Project Farmer's Market sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

For a pop of color and fun and Farmer’s Market Theme, we made a hairbow using lime fabric.  In fact, in all our Project Farmer’s Market creations, we added fruit or vegetable fabric somewhere.  Years ago, Allegra had a farmer’s market business sewing and selling fruit and vegetable themed aprons.  So we have lots of scraps of this kind of fabric left in our stash, and made good use of it all through our makes for this project. Here is a cute lime fabric that is very similar and would make a fun hair bow!

Tina loves this dress, and choose to wear it on her birthday!  She loves clothes and loves to tell people when she’s wearing something, “Momma made it!”  

Find the D’Anjou Dress here in the Project Run & Play shop.
Find the whole Project Farmer’s Market collection here in the shop at a 30% discount!
Find the unisex mini collection here in the shop at a 25% discount!
Find the girls mini collection here in the shop at a 25% discount!
Enjoy viewing the Project Farmer’s Market lookbook here.

All greenhouse photos by Carrie of Beri Bee Designs.  Affiliate links are used in this post.  If you click them we might make a few extra pennies at no extra cost to you.  Thank you for supporting our small business!

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Janie Dress & Hatteras Hoodie

Janie Dress and Hatteras Hoodie sewn by Skirt Fixation

It’s another Janie Dress for the baby, let’s just get that out of the way first thing!!  There are so many reasons we keep making this dress pattern…and one of the main ones is that she loves them so much!

Janie Dress and Hatteras Hoodie sewn by Skirt Fixation

For this Janie Dress, we made the short sleeve circle skirt version.  We used some fabric leftover from a dress made for Annie earlier in the year, you can see it here.

Janie Dress and Hatteras Hoodie sewn by Skirt Fixation

Or you can see it here!  Annie and Baby Tina LOVE to wear matching dresses!  This gorgeous fabric is some Art Gallery Fabric knit fabric, so you know it’s super soft and very good quality.  

Janie Dress and Hatteras Hoodie sewn by Skirt Fixation

For Annie’s dress we used the Camden Raglan pattern and made some changes (you can read the full details here) to make it into a dress.  She adores this dress even though at first she wasn’t sure about the raw hems on the sleeves and hem.  Let me assure you it’s getting very well worn!

Janie Dress and Hatteras Hoodie sewn by Skirt Fixation

For Baby Tina’s dress we used the Janie Dress pattern (duh!) like I mentioned earlier, and also made her a hoodie to go coordinate with it for extended Season wear.  We were delighted to find out she fits into the very smallest size of the Hatteras Hoodie pattern.  

Janie Dress and Hatteras Hoodie sewn by Skirt Fixation

Note to self: putting nuts in the pocket of Baby Tina’s hoodie before the photo shoot is over means she will have food in her mouth or be chewing in almost every single photo.  But she really is enamored with the pockets of this hoodie and constantly finds things to put in them.  She has a domino she’s dubbed her “phone” which she religiously carries around in one pocket!

Janie Dress and Hatteras Hoodie sewn by Skirt Fixation

The fabric of this Hatteras Hoodie is leftover from one of the hoodies I sewed for her brothers earlier in the year.  You can see that post here.  The hoodie is lined with more of the cherry blossom fabric, and a pink zipper makes this black hoodie perfectly girlie!

Janie Dress and Hatteras Hoodie sewn by Skirt Fixation

So from scraps, Baby Tina has a brand new, adorable, completely huggable outfit!  

Affiliate links are used in this post. If you click on one of our affiliate links, we might make a few pennies at no additional expense to you. Thank you for supporting our sewing habit!

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Janie “Mountain Dress”

Janie Mountain Dress sewn by Skirt Fixation

Today we get to share another Janie Dress with you.  Yes, we’re obsessed with this pattern!  This time we sewed it using French Terry fabric for a fall version.  We made just a few modifications, so stay tuned and we’ll give you all the details.

Janie Mountain Dress sewn by Skirt Fixation

The pattern we used is of course the Janie Dress and Peplum from the Project Run & Play shop.  Okay we admit it, we’ve lost track of how many we’ve sewn now.

Janie Mountain Dress sewn by Skirt Fixation  

For Tina, we like to cut out the circle skirt with the regular width marking at the top of the pattern piece, and then use the gathered length marking at the bottom of the pattern piece to make it a little longer for growing.  

Janie Mountain Dress sewn by Skirt Fixation

For this dress, we used some geometric mountains French Terry CLUB fabric from Raspberry Creek Fabrics.  We’ve had super good experiences with their french terry.  It’s high quality, easy to sew with, and doesn’t pill after many, many washings.  

Janie Mountain Dress sewn by Skirt Fixation

Because french terry fabric doesn’t have as much stretch as jersey fabric, we decided to make the neckband from an *almost* matching grey jersey fabric.  This is so that the dress would go easily on and off over her head.  

Janie Mountain Dress sewn by Skirt Fixation

This little girl loves textures as we’ve mentioned before.  She immediately notice the softer texture of this fabric and adores it!  Whenever it’s clean and hanging in her closet, she chooses her “mountain dress” as she calls it.  

Janie Mountain Dress sewn by Skirt Fixation

Tina has this very adorable expression she makes when you say “show me your pretty smile!”  Such a cheesy baby!   So of course she’s asked to show her smile many times a day and each time gets a big laugh…

Janie Mountain Dress sewn by Skirt Fixation

Originally, I had planned to sew something for one of the boys with this fabric.  It would have been super cute too, but I think both Tina and I are glad she was the recipient of this fabric for this dress!

Janie Mountain Dress sewn by Skirt Fixation

Because this is a CLUB fabric, it is a limited edition, so if you like it, don’t wait too long to grab some.  And you can find the Janie Dress pattern here.  We guarantee that some little girl in your life will thank you!

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Pink Wool Bunny Jacket

Pink Wool Bunny Jacket sewn by Skirt Fixation

Today’s outfit is both inspired and necessity sewing.  The inspiration comes from the Week 2 theme at Project Run & Play; Nature Inspired.  And the necessity comes from Baby Tina’s need for a winter jacket!  A pink wool bunny jacket.

Pink Wool Bunny Jacket sewn by Skirt Fixation

So 1st the jacket.  This is the Downton Duffel Jacket by Peekaboo Pattern Shop.  We really love this pattern, and have sewn it many times.  The fabric for this Downton Duffle Jacket came from a thrifting score!  This pink wool fabric was originally a wool blanket in perfect condition I found at the thrift store for $2.  I had no plans for it, but a huge wool blanket for that price was hard to pass up.

Pink Wool Bunny Jacket sewn by Skirt Fixation

The fabric lining is from the stash, leftover from our sewing for the Forest Floor blog tour.  It’s the Wild Posy Flora Fabric by Bonnie Christine for Art Gallery Fabrics.  It’s simply darling for the lining of this jacket.  I used up every last available scrap, and only had enough for one of the ears, did you notice?  But that’s okay because the other ear looks darling with the pink stretch leather I used for the hood trim, elbow patches and toggles.  Oh, and I borrowed the rabbit ears from the Twig + Tale Animal patterns and sewed them into the seams of the hood in the right places.  It’s an absolutely adorable addition, don’t you think?

Pink Wool Bunny Jacket sewn by Skirt Fixation

Speaking of that pink stretch leather, it gave me quite a time to get it on perfectly!  The problem was the stretch of the fabric, not the thinness.  Every trick I tried (teflon foot, tape on the bottom of a regular foot, a walking foot and more) failed and I ripped and ripped out the leather and cut out new toggles and tried again.  I even tried gluing the leather in place before sewing, but nope, I still got puckers!  

Pink Wool Bunny Jacket sewn by Skirt Fixation

Finally I found a combination that worked, thanks to asking for advice from my sewing friends on Instagram.  I ironed on double stick Steam-A-Seam 2 to the back of the toggle pieces and ironed them in place onto the jacket.  Then, with a walking foot on, I slowly HAND CRANKED around the edges of the piece. 

Pink Wool Bunny Jacket sewn by Skirt Fixation

Finally, success!  Oh, and these are the actual toggles are shank buttons from JoAnns and that’s shoelaces for the cording.

Pink Wool Bunny Jacket sewn by Skirt Fixation

The jacket is lined with quilt batting for extra warmth in the cold of winter.  Baby Tina absolutely loves this jacket!  Once she discovered the pockets, she didn’t want to take it off.  She’s enamored with pockets on her clothes.  

Pink Wool Bunny Jacket sewn by Skirt Fixation

And I was sure to use one of my new labels from Dutch Label Shop.  I hand sewed it on either side, leaving it open in the middle to act as a hook for hanging.  (Remember, you can use the code skirtfixation15 for 15% off your purchase until December 3rd.)

Pink Wool Bunny Jacket sewn by Skirt Fixation

This year, the Downtown Duffle Jacket is a little large because I sewed a size 2T.  The one I sewed her for her 1st baby capsule wardrobe is just barely too small, and it was 6-12 months size.  My hope is that by rolling up the sleeves, this one might even fit her next winter too.

Rosemary Raglan sewn by Skirt Fixation

Next in her “Momma made it” wardrobe is a Rosemary Raglan with a couple of fun additions.  First of all, there are little ears sewed into the raglan sleeve seams.  I used the same stretch leather as on the jacket, and they ended up being a little heavy and hanging down, so they’re actually stitched to the sleeves as well.

Rosemary Raglan sewn by Skirt Fixation

The only other change I made was to add a little vinyl llama face to go with the ears!  I used my Cricut Maker to cut it out quickly and easily.  Then using the EasyPress 2, I attached it on and now have confidence it’s not coming off!  You can find the llama face by searching #M8B6E613 in the Cricut Design Space™.

Rosemary Raglan sewn by Skirt Fixation

This super soft French Terry from Raspberry Creek Fabrics.  (It’s sold out now, but check out all their French Terry fabric!)  It’s actually the leftover scraps from a Halifax Hoodie that Allegra sewed for herself.  She’s been sewing herself a capsule wardrobe, and it’s neat to see it come together!

Pink Wool Bunny Jacket sewn by Skirt Fixation

The final piece in Baby Tina’s outfit is a pair of black leggings from the Dressage Leggings pattern.  This fabric was actually left over from Annie’s leggings last week.  Once again, baby sewing is so fun and such a good use of scraps!

Pink Wool Bunny Jacket sewn by Skirt Fixation

Now we’ll leave you with this silly expression that she makes whenever you say, “Show my your smile!” 

Affiliate links are used in this post.  If you click on one of our affiliate links, we might make a few pennies at no extra cost to you.  Thank you for supporting our small business!

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Camo Boys and Sweatpants

Camo pajama pants sewn by Skirt Fixation

My two little boys are currently in their camo phase.  Do all boys go through a camo phase?  All my boys have!  If their camo clothes are clean, they refuse to wear anything else.  Scratch that, they wear their camo clothes when they’re dirty, wet, stained, ripped, dusty, ragged, holey and in any possible condition!

Camo pajama pants sewn by Skirt Fixation

Rather than fight this phase, I’m just surrendering to it.  In fact, I’m afraid I’ve crossed the border into complicit because of their delight whenever I sew them something with camo fabric!  

A while back I sewed them these two jersey tees, and the above photo was taken shortly after I sewed them.  You can see that David already has one hole in his shirt.  Probably from commando crawling across the rocks on the hillside or something.  

Camo pajama pants sewn by Skirt Fixation

The pants they are wearing were NOT made by me, but they have been worn through the knees already.  I’d like to think that if I had made them I would have used tougher fabric and double reinforced the knees.  It’s almost like the company that made them never had little boys.  Or never was little boys.  Or never was the kind of boy who prefers climbing over a fence to using a gate.

Camo pajama pants sewn by Skirt FixationI did however sew these boys some camo pajama pants recently however using the Oliver + S Parachute Sweatpants pattern.  That is, they were intended to be pajama pants, but I caught a boy coming in from outside the other day wearing them.  And they were covered with hay.  He was just rescuing his kitty from the top of the hay stack, he explained!

 

Camo pajama pants sewn by Skirt Fixation

If you look in this photo, you can see that after several months of self imposed “navy seal training” (which involves crab walking across hot pavement, belly dragging under wires, crossing precariously balanced logs, and jumping from the highest heights they can find, plus I don’t even want to know what else!) David’s shirt has acquired several more holes.  In fact it looks like a cheese grater.  If asked, he’d probably have some story about being clawed by a bear.  

Camo pajama pants sewn by Skirt Fixation

So whether they’re cuddling chicks, chasing dogs or wrestling with each other, these two boys can be found in camo clothes.  And I say let boys be boys; it’s healthy that way!

Camo pajama pants sewn by Skirt Fixation

For more information about the sweatpants I sewed for them, please check out my post over at CaliFabrics.  There you can also see the larger pair of camo sweatpants I sewed for Thomas and the two pairs of non camo sweatpants for the girls.  Plus the backstory on her shirt!

Leave me a comment…do you sew for boys?  With camo fabric?