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1 Pattern, 3 Shirts – A Comparison

Union St. Tee sewn by Skirt Fixation

Recently, I used the Union St. Tee pattern from Hey June Patterns to sew 3 quite different shirts for my daughters and I.  It’s one thing we love about this pattern, the versatility.  And if you would like to read an in-depth comparison of the 3 fabrics I used, head over to CaliFabrics.

Union St. Tee

The first Union St. Tee I sewed was for Allegra.  She requested the scoop neckline and elbow length sleeves.  I’ve actually never made the scoop neckline before, and think it looks so nice on her!  The elbow length sleeves will help stretch this tee into fall wearing.  Allegra requested a semi-slouchy tee, so I made a size large and graded out to a size XL at the hips.  Also, I used the full bust adjustment front piece and it fits so nicely on her.  Finally, I added 1 extra inch of width at the shoulders, because although she is not as tall as Aria or I, she got that wide shoulder gene.   Her Union St. Tee is made from modal fabric.

Union St. Tee sewn by Skirt Fixation

The next Union St. Tee I sewed for Aria.  She requested the crew neckline and elbow length sleeves.  After she felt the camo linen jersey, she also requested a slouchy tee, so I made her a size L, and added 1” at the shoulders and 2” to the length.  Since this fabric doesn’t have much recovery, I used plain white jersey for the neckband.  I haven’t officially admitted it yet, but I think she’s taller than me.

Union St. Tee sewn by Skirt Fixation

And of course, I had to get in on the Union St. Tee fun!  I sewed the v-neck and raised it 1”, my standard adjustment for this pattern.  I added 1.5” to the length and also used the 1” broad shoulder adjustment.  To make this tee just right for fall wearing, I also chose the elbow length sleeve.  For fun, I added a striped pocket to this tee.  My Union St. Tee is made from double brushed poly fabric.  

Union St. Tee sewn by Skirt Fixation

In a side by side comparison (there are more of these over at CaliFabrics) you can see more of the differences in the 3 shirts.  One pattern, 3 different shirts, 3 happy wearers!

Affiliate links are used in this post, because we love buying fabric and patterns!  If you click on one of our affiliate links, we might make a few extra pennies at no extra cost to you.  Thank you for supporting our small business.  Be assured we only recommend and link to products we use and love!

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Cricut Mountain Make-A-Thon Review

Cricut Mountain Make-A-Thon review by Skirt Fixation

The last week of July, I was invited to teach a sewing class at the Cricut Mountain Make-A-Thon.  Cricut paid my way to the conference and gave me lots of nice swag while I was there, but this post is not sponsored by them.  This was my 1st time teaching at a conference.

Creative business cards by Skirt Fixation made using the Cricut Maker

Before I went, I used my Cricut Maker to create some fun, creative, sewing themed business cards.  First I printed my blog name and contact info on card stock.  Then, I had the Maker cut out the card and the sewing machine shape from card stock.  It also cut out the fabric rectangles for me.  Then I simply sewed a fabric square to each card.  Afterward, I was looking at the pile of sewing machine cutouts, and decided to glue one to the back of each card rather then throw them away!  It was easy, fast, and quite effective for a creative business card!

Cricut Mountain Make-A-Thon review by Skirt Fixation

The conference was held at the Little America Hotel in Salt Lake City.  It is a very nice hotel, and since I had Mr. Skirt Fixation and Baby with me, we really appreciated our spacious king sized hotel room!

Cricut Mountain Make-A-Thon review by Skirt Fixation

Each morning, there was a presentation during the breakfast in the great ballroom.  Above is the only photo I snapped during one of the presentations.  I wish I had gotten photos of the creative displays on each side of the room, but if you search the hashtag on Instagram, you can see great examples.

Cricut Mountain Make-A-Thon review by Skirt Fixation

The sewing class I taught was the Curved Zipper Pouch project from Cricut Design Space™.  Anna Griffin, the creator of this project, was actually at the Cricut Make-A-Thon!  Before teaching the class, I had sewed up several samples for students to see.  It also gave me a chance to embellish the zipper pouches with a variety of Cricut products like glitter iron on, chalkboard iron on, floral iron ons, and so on.  Each pouch had some of the striped fabric you see above, which is the Riley Blake Stripes Fat Quarter stack.  Some of the pouches are lined with it, like the blue leather pouch with the flag…inside are red and white stripes!

Cricut Mountain Make-A-Thon review by Skirt Fixation

This is the presenter side of my sewing classroom.  Each teacher gave a Powerpoint presentation on that large screen and the students could follow along with the steps.  Besides teaching their own class, we presenters helped out in several other classes.  I was so glad to have helpers in my class with a knowledge of sewing because many of my students had never sewn a zipper before!

Cricut Mountain Make-A-Thon review by Skirt Fixation

On the student side of the classroom, there were sewing stations, Maker cutting stations, new EasyPresses for pressing projects, and so on.  Depending on the size of the class, some students had to share the machines.  We teachers knew this ahead of time, and so I prepared my class so that different students could be working on different machines at the same time.

Cricut Mountain Make-A-Thon review by Skirt Fixation

Before we went, the Cricut team warned us they were going to be loading us up with things to take home…and boy did they ever!  I brought home enough stuff to share with all my kids, and I’ve got a giveaway below too because I’ll never be able to use everything!

Cricut Mountain Make-A-Thon review by Skirt Fixation

One thing I have been using a lot is the BrightPad.  It is the perfect thing for assembling PDF patterns!  Now I don’t even trim the pages, just line them up, tape and go.  It’s so fast and even fun!  The BrightPad was designed to make weeding vinyl (taking out the extra, unnecessary pieces) easier, and I can’t wait to use it for that too.

Cricut Mountain Make-A-Thon review by Skirt Fixation

I think my favorite part of the Cricut Mountain Make-A-Thon was getting to meet and interact with the different sewing friends I’d only know virtually until then.  In the photo above, those of us termed “the tall ladies” posed together.  Left to right, I was delighted to meet Heather of Heather Handmade, Karly of Paisley Roots, (me) and Sarah of Pattern Revolution, and so many more sewing and creative bloggers!

Cricut Mountain Make-A-Thon review by Skirt Fixation

Now for that giveaway I mentioned!  I’m giving away everything in the photo above, and possibly more too!  To enter this giveaway, leave a comment below, and then head over to Instagram for another entry.  Giveaway not sponsored by Cricut.  Giveaway will end in one week and winner will be chosen randomly.  Affiliate links are used in this post.  If you click on one of our affiliate links, we might make a small commission for referring you.  But don’t worry, we only recommend products we actually use and love!

Cricut Mountain Make-A-Thon review by Skirt Fixation

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A Sweet, Sentimental Collar from Old Linens

Vintage Linen Collar sewn by Skirt Fixation

Today I’ve got a sweet, sentimental collar story!  When a fabric is listed with the title “Robin’s Egg Blue” and that’s the exact color of your baby’s eyes, there’s no question as to whether or not you’re going to get that fabric!  And the icing on the cake is that this is some of the nicest jersey I’ve ever worked with.  You can read my full review of the dress fabric over on the CaliFabrics blog.  But today I want to share with you about that sweet little collar made from vintage linen.

Vintage Linen Collar sewn by Skirt Fixation

Recently, we had the opportunity to help some dear friends of ours move to a new home.  This move was all about downsizing.  That meant having to disposition many belongings.  And if you’ve ever had to get rid of something sentimental, you know what an agonizing process this was for our friends.  

Vintage Linen Collar sewn by Skirt Fixation

Being the sweet, selfless friends they are, they tried to give many of their belongings to the people helping them with the moving process.  We all know that it hurts less to give things to people you know will love and care for them than to throw them away or send them to a faceless donation center.

Vintage Linen Collar sewn by Skirt Fixation

The problem with this plan for us was that with 8 kids and 2 adults in our home, we don’t need and don’t have room for many more belongings than we already have!  In fact, we have a sort of constant purging process in place around here.  But a few small things made it home with us, despite our best intentions to the contrary.

Vintage Linen Collar sewn by Skirt Fixation

One precious item we just couldn’t refuse was a box of vintage linens.  I mean fabric, right?  (The photo above shows what it looks like when you tell a toddler to twirl so you can get a shot of the circle skirt on her dress!  Toddler’s can’t twirl!!!)

Vintage Linen Collar sewn by Skirt Fixation

Plus, these are some pretty special linens.  There are hand embroidered items, and probably hand crocheted edges although I’m not an expert in that field.  One oval shaped linen had a note pinned to it with the words, “First embroidery I ever did pre-teen.”  But when we asked our friend, she said it was not her work but her mother’s!

Vintage Linen Collar sewn by Skirt Fixation

There are lace items too.  One problem is that in our day and age, linens like these are not used as they were originally.  Some of the vintage linens are of shapes and sizes we can’t even identify their original use.  But each one is gorgeous and clearly hand made.

A couple of the vintage linens have yellowing, as many old linens do.  One such one we decided to use as the collar for Baby’s new dress.  The delicate embroidery is encased between the two layers of collar, and featured on the tips.  It really adds such a beautiful touch to this darling dress!

So that is the story of a box of vintage linens, some dear friends and a collar on a robin’s egg blue dress.  Leave us a comment, what would YOU do with a box of vintage linens?

Dress: Janie Dress

Fabric: Robin’s Egg Blue jersey from CaliFabrics

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DIY Michael Kors Skirt

DIY Michael Kors Skirt tutorial by Skirt Fixation

Today we have another Buy or DIY skirt for you! Everyone seems to love this series and keeps begging for more! This time we’re showing you how you can make a gorgeous skirt for fall on the cheap. Our skirt pick of the day is a Michael Kors skirt from Nordstrom. Keep reading for our DIY Michael Kors skirt!

DIY Michael Kors Skirt Details:

DIY Michael Kors Skirt tutorial by Skirt Fixation
Original Skirt: Michael Kors Rose Print Georgette Dance Skirt from Nordstrom

DIY Michael Kors Skirt tutorial by Skirt Fixation

Fabric Recommendation: Timeless Treasures Glamour Tossed Rose Buds Fabric

DIY Michael Kors Skirt tutorial by Skirt Fixation

Pattern Recommendation: Megan Nielsen Veronika Skirt 

Invisible zipper:

9″ Black invisible zipper on Amazon

DIY Michael Kors Skirt Math:

Nordstrom Michael Kors Rose Print Georgette Dance Skirt: $1995 retail price.
Fabric needed: 3.5 yards
Pattern: $13.08 or FREE for newsletter subscribers
Fabric: $9.45 per yard
Notions: 9” invisible zipper $4.99
Total Cost: $38.07
Total Savings: $1956.93

DIY Michael Kors Skirt tutorial by Skirt Fixation

DIY Michael Kors Skirt How To:

Basically, this one is easy, buy the fabric and get the pattern for FREE by subscribing to the newsletter at the bottom of this page.  Then sew it up!  This skirt is fun and easy to make, you can see our review and one we made here.  The original Michael Kors skirt is silk fabric, so the cotton we’ve chosen won’t have as much drape. To make up for that, we chose a circle skirt pattern, so it will flow and move and hang beautifully.

Wow, the DIY wins again!! Are you seeing a pattern here? Ha, but seriously, it’s so easy and fun to sew your own couture looking clothes!

Click here to see all our Buy or DIY Skirt posts.

Check out our Copycat Skirts board on Pinterest too!   

Affiliate links are used in this post to really amazing patterns and fabric. If you click on one of our links, we might make a few extra pennies at no extra cost to you. Thanks for supporting our fabric and pattern sewing habit!

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Phoenix Blouse with 3 changes

In my last post I mentioned that one reason I didn’t mind sewing a Phoenix Blouse for Aria was that I was sewing 2 at a time.  And of course the other one was for me!  Ever since I sewed up my wearable muslin Phoenix Blouse, I’ve been wanting more.

Phoenix Blouse sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

Having sewed a muslin, I knew there were just three changes I wanted to make.  Two I’ll definitely make again, and the other I won’t!

The first thing I wanted to do was to try the Phoenix Blouse with the flutter sleeves from the Amalfi Dress, just like on Aria’s blouse.  It is such a feminine touch!  And I absolutely adore wearing these sleeves.  They swoop and swish and flow and twirl with movement all their own!  I’ll definitely be adding these sleeves to a Phoenix Blouse again.

Phoenix Blouse sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

The 2nd change I make was to eliminate the slit in the front yoke.  I think I just wanted to see if it would still slip over my head without the slit.  It does, obviously.  It also raises the neckline a little for modesty reasons (think bending over and chasing little kids all day!)  Also, this fabric is quite busy, so I thought eliminating the slit would help simplify the blouse a little.

While I love this blouse due to the sleeves and the fabric, I probably won’t eliminate the slit again.  It just seems to take away from the style lines somewhat.

Phoenix Blouse sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

The final change was to take in the side seams a little bit.  I did this for Aria on her blouse, and it creates such a nice silhouette while still staying true to the boho feel of the blouse.  It’s still very loose and comfortable to wear, but has a bit of shaping.  This is a change I’ll be making again in the future.

Phoenix Blouse sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

This fabric is a poly crepe I got from Indiesew.  It’s currently sold out, but they carry very, very nice quality fabric, so I always keep an eye on what they have in stock.  If you’re specifically looking for poly crepe, here is a pretty selection.

Phoenix Blouse sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

Poly crepe is worth looking into, it’s inexpensive, lightweight, and oh the drape!  Poly crepe has a slight pebbled texture to it.  The one I got from Indiesew is slightly shiny on one side.  It washes well, and is easy to iron.  As the name suggests, it is polyester, so does not breathe as well as natural fibers.

Phoenix Blouse sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

I have been wearing this Phoenix Blouse with both this black skirt and this brown one.  What color would you wear on bottom with this blouse?  And also, have I convinced you it’s the Summer of the Phoenix Blouse yet?  (If not, stay tuned…)

Affiliate links are used in this post to fabric and patterns we use love.  We highly recommend them, and our lawyer recommends that we tell you that if you click on one of our links, we might make a few pennies at no extra cost to you.  We tried to explain to him that you love fabric and patterns and sewing as much as we do, but in the midst of his long legal mumbo jumbo explanation  we got lost and started sewing in our heads.  So here’s the disclaimer statement!

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The Summer of the Phoenix Blouse {part 2}

Phoenix Blouse sewed and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

A while back, I promised this was going to be the summer of the Phoenix Blouse.  So it’s about time for another post about the Phoenix Blouse, don’t you think?  Don’t worry, I’ll make up for it with 2 posts about it this week, okay?

Phoenix Blouse sewed and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

When Aria saw the Phoenix Blouse I sewed for myself, she “needed” one.  And I get it, I “need” a few more myself!  After trying on my Phoenix Blouse, she had some exact requests for her Phoenix Blouse.  She wanted the Amalfi Dress sleeves and for the Phoenix Blouse to be a little more fitted.  These were easy adjustments to make!

To make Aria’s Phoenix Blouse more fitted, we simply basted the sides of the size 6.  Then she tried it on inside out.  I pinned the sides to the amount of fitted-ness that she requested, and then I sewed up the side seams.  

Phoenix Blouse sewed and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

The Phoenix Blouse is made to have the sleeves from the Amalfi Dress fit, so that was an easy adjustment too.  Both patterns are designed by Hey June Patterns, and she deliberately made these two patterns work together.  We just used the size 6 sleeves from the Amalfi Dress pattern, and lengthened them a little so they hit right at Aria’s elbow after hemming.  

Phoenix Blouse sewed and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

Just like on my blouse, we used layers of blue lace on the front yoke.  It creates such a cute boho look! 

The fabric is rayon challis from Raspberry Creek Fabrics.  You can find it right here.  It’s perfectly soft and drapey and also cool to wear in hot weather.  Aria has gotten many, many compliments while wearing her new Phoenix Blouse.

Phoenix Blouse sewed and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

To go with her new blouse, Aria requested a new skirt.  She settled on a Runway Skirt made from black stretch sateen with black rayon challis godets.  

Because we were using woven fabric (and the Runway Skirt is designed for knit fabric) we decided to go up a size from where Aria was on the measurement chart.  This was a mistake because we ended up taking the skirt in at every seam (after these photos were taken.)  Next time we sew a woven Runway Skirt, we’ll just stick with the regular size.  The skirt is not designed with negative ease, so making it with woven fabric, or even stretch woven fabric is not an issue as there is a zipper in the back.  Lesson learned!

Phoenix Blouse sewed and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

While Aria can and does sew her own clothes, recently we’ve come to an agreement.  If she cuts out the fabric, I’ll sew it up for her…especially if I’m making two of the same pattern like I was this time.  But more on that in the next post…

Affiliate links are used in this post to products we use, love and highly recommend.  If you click on one of our affiliate links, we may make a few pennies for recommending that item to you.  Thanks and happy sewing!

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10 Ways to use a Cricut Maker for Apparel Sewing

10 Ways to Use the Cricut Maker for Apparel Sewing by Skirt Fixation

Today I’m sharing 10 amazing ways to use a Cricut Maker for Apparel Sewing.  This post was sponsored by Cricut, but all opinions are mine.  When Cricut introduced the Maker and it’s amazing rotary blade for putting virtually any fabric without a backer, it opened up a whole bunch of opportunities for those of us who love apparel sewing.  So let’s get started with the 10 ways to use a Cricut Maker for apparel sewing.

1-Baby Bloomers

Simplicity Baby Bloomers sewn by Skirt Fixation

Did you know that you can find complete sewing patterns on Cricut Design Space™?  It’s true!  I found these darling little chambray bloomers in the Design Space project center and sewed up a pair for my baby quicker than you can imagine!  Bloomers under her skirts and dresses are a go-to garment around here, and this pair will go super well with the little capsule wardrobe I’m sewing for her!

Simplicity Baby Bloomers sewn by Skirt Fixation

It was super duper easy to sew up these bloomers after the Cricut Maker cut out the chambray fabric and marked the pieces and notches using the fabric marking pen.  Note: the pattern says it is sized for a 6 month baby, but due to the elastic, it’s working fine for Baby who is 16 months.  Just note the weight and size.  And we used Baby’s measurements for the elastic, not the guide given.  We will definitely be sewing up more of these Simplicity Baby Bloomers!  You can find the project right here.

2-Headband

Headband sewing by Skirt Fixation

This darling headband is also a Cricut Design Space™ project.  The only change we made was to use knit fabric instead of felt because we didn’t have felt in the right colors we wanted.  But it’s sooooooo cute!  You can find the project here.

3-Graphic Tees

Patriotic fabric parade created and sewn by Skirt Fixation

This one is a crowd favorite for sure!  I created the patriotic tee above using my Cricut Maker to cut out the Sport Flex Iron On.  Although I do not have an Easy Press, many people report great success with using it to iron on their images to their tees.  You can read more about Annie’s outfit and grab that FREE cut file here.

4-Exterior Label Tags

Special tag for denim by Skirt Fixation

In my recent Denim Week series, I shared two leather and Kraftex tags I created using the Cricut Maker for the back of my denim skirts I sewed.  They add a very classy and special touch to any denim garment.

5-Interior Garment Labels

My friend Tami, from SewSophieLynn, shared how to make custom interior size labels for garments in this post.  Boy oh boy, did I need that information with all the different sizes I have going on around here with 8 kids!

6-Elbow and Knee Patches

The very talented Abby from Sew Much Ado used the Cricut Maker to add knee patches to her free baby pants pattern that we love!  Read all about it in this post.  You can also use the same technique to add elbow patches…which we love to do too!

7-Day of the Week Underwear

Kari from That’s Sew Kari created these perfectly adorable and practical day of the week underwear in this post.  How much more genius can it get?  She used her Cricut Explore Air 2, but of course you can use the Cricut Maker to do the same thing!

8-Removeable Collar

Amber of Amber Simmons used her Cricut Maker to create this fabulous Peter Pan collar.  It’s just the cutest thing ever!  We’d use it to layer under sweaters in the winter for just the right touch.  Read more about it in her post here.

9-Baby Shoes

These baby shoes were made with the help of a Cricut Maker!  Aren’t they about the most darling thing ever?  This project can be found in Design Space here.  The next person I know who has a baby girl is definitely getting these in their handmade care package!

10-Baby Dress

A complete baby dress for 3-6 months size!  This entire project can be cut out on the Cricut Maker.  Plus all the notches get cut out too, and any markings are marked.  Those are my least favorite parts of the project!  Did you know that you can find over 500+ digital sewing patterns and quilt blocks available from Simplicity®, Riley Blake™, and more (sold separately) through Cricut Design Space™?  And Design Space® software works for iOS, Android™, Windows®, and Mac® too.

10 Ways to Use the Cricut Maker for Apparel Sewing by Skirt Fixation

If you’re considering a Cricut Maker for apparel sewing, these are 10 options to get you started.  And also you might like to know the Cricut Maker offers the ultimate in cutting performance and versatility. Unlike all other cutting machines it has:

  • Bluetooth® wireless technology
  • Adaptive Tool System™ for professional-level cutting performance and expandability
  • Compatible with Washable Fabric Pen for marking pattern pieces (sold separately)
  • Cuts hundreds of materials, from the most delicate fabric and paper to matboard and leather
  • The ultimate in professional-level cutting performance and versatility

And more!  Leave us a comment, what apparel project would you sew with a Cricut Maker?

Affiliate links are used in this post to products we use and recommend.  If you click on one of our links, we may make a small commission at no extra cost to you.  Thank you for helping support our small business!

This is a sponsored conversation written by me on behalf of Cricut. The opinions and text are all mine.

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Sandbryce Skirt

Sandbryce Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

Meet my new favorite summer outfit.  This is the mash up of 2 patterns, the Sandbridge Skirt and the Bryce Cargos.  I’m calling it the Sandbryce Skirt.  I’ve been on a hunt for a good cargo skirt pattern, and finally decided to take matters into my own hands.  I ended up with a skirt I’m going to be making again ASAP so this one can get some rest.  Or at least not worn 3 times per week!

Sandbryce Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

Earlier in the year, Emily shared a tutorial over at Hey June Handmade on how to mash these two patterns but she did it the exact opposite of me!  So it’s not copying at all, is it?  She used the Sandbridge Skirt on top and the Bryce Cargo pants on bottom to make herself a pair of jeans.

Sandbryce Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

To create my Sandbryce Skirt, I laid out the pattern pieces for the Bryce Cargo pants first.  Then on top of them I overlaid the Sandbridge Skirt pattern pieces.  I lined them up the best I could.  On the front pieces, I matched up the zip fly parts.  

Sandbryce Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

For the back pieces, I matched the hip curves for the outseam.  Then I folded in the crotch triangles for the pants pattern on front and back.  As you can see on the front, the Sandbridge Skirt pattern piece is wider than the Bryce Cargo piece (on top of it.)  Because I was using stretch twill, I eventually decided just to go with the side seam of the Bryce Cargos so as not to mess up the pocket, and angled in from the hem to that point.

Sandbryce Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

As far as instructions went, I basically followed the Bryce Cargo steps, except where obviously I needed to follow the Sandbridge Skirt steps.  It worked out great!  The only change I might make next time is to take in the center back a little more at the top.  

Sandbryce Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

I made this Sandbryce Skirt knee length, just by measuring how long I needed it, and continuing the lines of the skirt down that far at the same angles.  

Sandbryce Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

You can see the insides of this skirt are very professionally finished, per the pattern instructions (on both patterns!)  

Sandbryce Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

Adding all the hardware (snaps) was a learning experience for me, but totally worth it!  Like I mentioned in my Denim Week series, the hardware is one of the things that makes a skirt look professional and not “homemade.”

Sandbryce Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

This fabric is stretch twill from JoAnn Fabrics in a color called Clay.  It is amazingly good quality, and very, very comfortable!  In fact, I’ve already picked up some in this khaki to make myself another Sandbryce Skirt.  And I really want to get it in this olive green color except my local store doesn’t have it right now.  (The price of this stretch twill online right now is ridiculously cheap!!!)

Sandbryce Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

Of course I had to make myself a new shirt to go with my new skirt.  I made myself the Santa Fe top using the most beautiful rayon spandex jersey from Raspberry Creek Fabrics.  It’s currently sold out, but they have a beautiful selection of other rayon spandex jersey fabric.

This is seriously my favorite outfit to wear, and I think Mr. Skirt Fixation likes it a little bit too!  

Sandbryce Skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

Have you ever mashed up two patterns and ended up with an end result that was better (if possible!) than either of the patterns to begin with?  That’s the beauty of sewing your own clothes…you can make EXACTLY what you love every time!

Affiliate links are used in this post to patterns and fabric we use and love.  If you click on one of our links, we might make a little bit of money at no extra cost to you for referring you to that company.  Thanks for supporting our small business!

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How to Thread the Brother 1034d Serger

The time has come!  It’s time to learn how to thread the Brother 1034d serger/overlocker.  This video is specifically about how to thread the Brother 1034D machine, while most of the rest of our serger school videos can be applied to any serger or overlocker.

This next lesson in the Serger School series is all about threading the Brother 1034d serger the proper way.  Often, the cheater method we showed you last lesson works great, but at other times you’ll need to know the proper way to thread your machine.  If one of your threads breaks, or if you have a Brother 1034d that’s completely unthreaded, and so on, you’ll need this video.  

Many people say this is the hardest part about owning a serger, but in this video, we show you each step.  And the whole video is just over 5 minutes long.  So threading really is not that arduous of a task.  You can do it!  

A serger (or overlocker if you’re outside of the US) has 4 threads.  A regular sewing machine has one thread and a bobbin.  That is one thing that makes a serger more complicated to thread.  After a while, threading your serger will become very easy to you, and you won’t hesitate to change thread colors as needed for a project.  But we understand the trepidation when it’s an unfamiliar process.  That’s why we creating this video for you about how to thread the Brother 1034d serger.

We promise you that this video will simplify the threading process for you.  If you’re struggling with one certain thread, here is where each of them start in the video:

Upper Looper: 0:26

Lower Looper: 2:15

Left and Right Needles: 3:37

In the video, and in our studio, we use the Brother 1034d serger.

Brother 1034d Serger

 

We recommend these threads:

GREY Low Lint, High Tensile Strength Polyester Serger Thread

BLACK Low Lint, High Tensile Strength Polyester Serger Thread

WHITE Low Lint, High Tensile Strength Polyester Serger Thread

If your serger is still in the box, go here for Lesson 1.

We also suggest our lesson on Cheater Threading!

Need thread storage solutions?  Try this post.

Subscribe to our channel on YouTube!   We post videos about sewing and serging.

How to thread the Brother 1034d serger video tutorial from Skirt Fixation

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Janie Dress and Peplum

Janie Dress sewn by Skirt Fixation

Today is our stop on the Project Run & Play Shop Grand Opening blog tour!  It’s an exciting day to be able to share not only these Janie dresses with you, but the whole Project Run & Play Shop.  This idea has been over a year in the making, and it’s so delightful to have a place to offer the amazing Project Run & Play design all in one spot!

Janie Dress sewn by Skirt Fixation

The whole month of July is the grand opening celebration.  There is a huge giveaway, sales each week, and every single pattern is being featured and sewn by a talented Project Run & Play designer.  

Janie Dress sewn by Skirt Fixation

This week, dresses are featured.  They are for sale for 20% off in the shop.  We got to sew up the Janie Dress and Peplum pattern.  This darling knit dress has quite a few options, and we couldn’t help but sew up two different version.  

Janie Dress sewn by Skirt Fixation

The Janie Dress and Peplum can be made in 13 sizes from 6 months to 12 years.  We sewed a size 12 months for Baby.  The pattern is very thorough with photo illustrations and detailed instructions.  

Janie Dress sewn by Skirt Fixation

One thing we love about this pattern is that cute collar!  It is perfectly drafted, and is super easy to attach.  Plus it lays right exactly where it’s supposed to at all times, which is very important!

Janie Dress sewn by Skirt Fixation

As you might know, knit neckbands are a particular point of interest to us when we sew patterns, and we are delighted to report that this one is absolutely perfect!  It lays flat with no curling or buckling.  Another sign of a superbly drafted pattern in our opinion!

Janie Dress sewn by Skirt Fixation

The Janie Dress can have either a circle skirt or a gathered circle skirt.  In the floral dress, we did the circle skirt option.  But we added length simply by using the gathered circle skirt hem length.  Quick, easy, and super effective to make this pattern last a little longer on a growing baby.  

Janie Dress sewn by Skirt Fixation

The fabric for this dress is Indigo and Aster knit jersey La Floraison.  We also used it for Annie’s cardigan here.  The collar fabric is some indigo denim-look knit fabric.  I used it because it really accentuates Baby’s eye color!

Janie Dress sewn by Skirt Fixation

The other Janie dress we sewed is mostly the same, but we used the gathered circle skirt option.  This was also a very easy dress to sew.  We used some rust bamboo knit leftover from sewing myself a peplum I sewed for myself.  I guess I haven’t shared it here, except in my Me Made May round up post.  You can see it on Instagram here.

Janie Dress sewn by Skirt Fixation

The fabric is so lightweight and perfectly cool for summer because it’s bamboo and rayon mixed!  I love wearing my peplum, and I just know this dress will help Baby keep cool in the summer heat.

Janie Dress sewn by Skirt Fixation

These 2 Janie Dresses are just the beginning of a summer capsule wardrobe we’re sewing for Baby.  So stay tuned for lots more baby goodness and tons of photos in the near future!  And remember to head over to Project Run & Play for the grand opening tour!  You can enter the giveaway below also.  And get your Project Run & Play patterns here.

Janie Dress sewn by Skirt Fixation

 

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