Posted on

Double Circle Maxi Skirt for Summer

Double circle maxi skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

As I mentioned yesterday, I ordered another summer fabric from the Summer CLUB fabric line at Raspberry Creek Fabrics.  It’s called bubble stripe and I got the version on rayon challis.  (It also comes on jersey knit or french terry.)  This rayon challis is very easy to work with and doesn’t shift and move while you are working with it, like other rayon tends to do.  

Double circle maxi skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

Annie requested a summer maxi skirt.  Since there were a few ideas in my head I wanted to try out, I agreed!  Enter the double circle maxi skirt.  I’m not sure how successfully these worked out in person, so please chime in with your opinion!  I’ve broken the look down into separate ideas I tried with notes/thoughts on the success of that part.

Double circle maxi skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

Idea #1  Double circle skirt:

I used Dana of Made Everyday’s video tutorial for making circle skirts.  The double circle maxi skirt compounds the fun of a circle skirt, and I think this part works well!

Double circle maxi skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

Idea #2 Stripes on Stripes

For the top fabric, I used rayon challis in bubble stripe.  It’s lightweight, floaty, and simply divine for a circle skirt.  The colors are perfect for summer, and the bubbles are not such obvious stripes that they clash with the stripes underneath.  I think this part works too!

Double circle maxi skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

Idea #3 Different types of circles

The top circle skirt is a full circle skirt.  The reason there are side seams is because of a personal error where I forgot to make the 2nd fold.  Embarrassing!!!  But it’s still a full circle.  The skirt underneath is a 1/2 circle skirt with just a seam in the back.  Each would make a great skirt on it’s own, but the dichotomy between the two fullnesses doesn’t quite work, in my opinion.

Double circle maxi skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

Idea #4 Different fabric substrates

The top circle skirt is rayon challis, while the green stripes underneath are a rayon spandex knit.  Because the two fabrics have different weights and drape differently (which could also be part of the difference in fullnesses discussed in idea #3) so this idea is not grabbing me either.

Double circle maxi skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

Idea #5 Maxi circle skirt

With 60” wide fabric, about the longest you can make a full circle skirt is 25 inches.  (It depends on the waist measurement, but this is a child’s measurement, so an adult’s circle skirt will not be any longer.)  But Annie wanted a maxi circle skirt, so that was the reason for using a 1/2 circle underneath.  It’s possible to make a 1/2 circle skirt longer.  However, I think the difference between the two circles is too great.  Perhaps adding another layer in-between to break up the large gap would work better.  The top layer is 25” long, the bottom is 31” long, so adding a layer at 28” would bridge the gap.  You can see an example of a three layer circle skirt we made here.  Another option would be to use our tutorial for making a longer circle skirt with narrow fabric here.

Double circle maxi skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

You know what’s funny though?  All this dissection of the pattern and analysis of the elements of this skirt are only in my brain.  Annie has NO issues with this skirt!  She loves it, and that’s what I need to focus on, right?

Double circle maxi skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

I’m linking this up to the Streak, Stroke, Stripe! sew along at Project Run & Play, even thought I’m not eligible to win!  But you should link up any stripes you’ve sewn so you have a chance to win!

Double circle maxi skirt sewn by Skirt Fixation

Leave me a comment with your thoughts and opinions on this skirt.   Or let me know what you do when you overanalyze something you’ve created.

One thought on “Double Circle Maxi Skirt for Summer

  1. I love the floaty nature of the top circle and Annie’s obvious enjoyment wearing the skirt. SHE is happy with it!
    Sewing for me is an ongoing learning experience. There are times when I can’t understand why a designer decides on a particular technique and I decide to do something my own way only to discover that there was a reason for the designer’s choice and I have to get the seam ripper out. Then there are the times that there is truly something wrong with the pattern and it just doesn’t go together (after smocking and cutting all the pieces out of just barely enough fabric). That is when I TOSS the whole thing out and try not to cry.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.