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Knit Skirt to T-Shirt Refashion

Knit skirt to t-shrt refashion tutorial by Skirt Fixation

Today’s quick and easy tutorial walks you through the steps of turning that skirt you no longer wear into a t-shirt you’ll never stop wearing!  The best part?  No hemming!  Let’s make that skirt to t-shirt happen:

Updated Union St. Tee pattern review

Here is the knit maxi skirt I started with.  It’s a cotton/modal/spandex knit blend with some fun stripes at the bottom.  It has a huge elasticated waistband, I think intended to be one of those convertible dress/skirt things.  If you’re like me, those garments always end up being WAAAAAY too narrow in the hips, and I don’t even have that wide of hips!

Knit Skirt to T-shirt Refashion Step 1:

Knit skirt to t-shrt refashion tutorial by Skirt Fixation

First thing I recommend is laying out your pattern pieces over the skirt before making any cuts.  This is so you don’t have any nasty surprises later when you end up with only enough fabric left for 1 sleeve or something!  Ask me how I know…  I’m using the Union St. Tee pattern by Hey June Handmade.  It’s my favorite, read my full review here.

Knit Skirt to T-shirt Refashion Step 2:

Knit skirt to t-shrt refashion tutorial by Skirt Fixation

Alright, now that you have a plan, grab those scissors and get busy!  I cut the skirt up one side seam and cut off that waistband so things would lay flat.

Knit Skirt to T-shirt Refashion Step 3:

Knit skirt to t-shrt refashion tutorial by Skirt Fixation

Next, fold the skirt into the middle, and try to line up the fabric.  This was easy for me due to the stripes!  Line up the bottom of the pattern piece below the hem of the skirt by whatever amount is the seam allowance on the pattern.  For me the pattern piece was 1″ below the skirt in the center.

Knit Skirt to T-shirt Refashion Step 4:

Knit skirt to t-shrt refashion tutorial by Skirt Fixation

Okay, grab those scissors and get busy!  I cut out the front and back.  Next I folded the skirt all the way in 1/2 so I didn’t have a seam down the top of my sleeves, and cut the sleeves.  The neckband did end up with a seam at the center back (which a v-neck usually doesn’t have) but not a big deal!

Knit Skirt to T-shirt Refashion Step 5:

Sew that t-shirt together and put it on!  Once again, I used the Union St. Tee pattern and instructions from Hey June Patterns.  Happy sewing and t-shirt wearing!

Updated Union St. Tee pattern review

By now you probably know that the link to Hey June Patterns is an affiliate link.  That’s because it’s a really awesome pattern and we want you to succeed in your sewing ventures, not get frustrated or fail!  Because it’s an affiliate link, if you click on it, we might make a few pennies at no extra cost to you.  So thanks!

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Updated Union St. Tee Pattern Review

Updated Union St. Tee pattern review

I’m sure you’ve seen by now, but Hey June Patterns recently released their updated Union St. Tee pattern.  The Union St. Tee is one of our FAVORITE t-shirt patterns, and we’ve made lots and lots of them.  Here is the first one we blogged, and here is the most recent one we blogged.

So for the newly released pattern, we were hopeful about a couple of things.  1- the new Union has a more relaxed fit through the waist due to an updated finished garment measurements chart.  2-the new Union has a full bust adjustment piece included.

Updated Union St. Tee pattern review

Just in case the newly updated Union St. Tee was a complete wash out, I decided to refashioned a skirt instead of starting in with the good fabric.  Oh – I forgot to mention, the updated Union also has updated fabric recommendations.  The old version just recommended stretch knit fabrics.  The new one challenges you to improve the quality of your fabric a notch!  You can still use any stretch knit fabric, but the recommended ones are cotton/poly, triblend, rayon blends, bamboo, and modal.  Or you can use cotton spandex and size down for a fitted tee.  And while we’re down this rabbit hole, I discovered that sizing down is EXACTLY what I’d been doing!  Yep, I’d been sewing my favorite tee pattern a size smaller this whole time!!!  No wonder I was dissatisfied with the mommy tummy that sometimes made it’s presence known.

But back to the fabric recommendations.  Before I’d only used cotton spandex and sized down (accidentally!) for a fitted tee.  For this pink shirt I used double brushed poly, and it worked nicely too.

But because of the updated fabric recommendations, and because I’ve been hearing so many nice things about bamboo, modal and rayon blends, I really wanted to try one of these fabrics.  And it just happened that this skirt was a cotton/modal blend!  Plus it was too small, so worked perfectly for this updated Union St. Tee “muslin” test fitting.

Updated Union St. Tee pattern review

Let me just say that I should have totally trusted Adrianna, the genius behind Hey June Patterns!  Just like when she updated the Lane Raglan pattern and we tried it out, the updated Union St. Tee is perfection!  The fit (and correct sizing) is so utterly amazing.  I seriously wear this shirt every single time it’s clean.  And mum’s the word on wearing it sometimes when it’s dirty too! But in all honesty, this shirt is boosting my confidence level about the lack of muscles in the waist region…  It skims the chest and loosely floats around the mommy belly.

And for the record, modal is absolutely heavenly to sew with…I can’t wait to get into the good fabric now!

Updated Union St. Tee pattern review

For my fellow tall sewing friends, I added 1 inch to the body of the tee at the lengthen/shorten line.  I also added 1 inch to the shoulders.  And finally, I raised the neckline (and shortened the neckband accordingly) by 1” out of personal preference.  I just laid the new pattern pieces over my old ones and traced off these fit changes from them.

Updated Union St. Tee pattern review

Stay tuned for many, many more updated Union St. Tee makes around here!

Also, I promise you a quick and easy tutorial on how to refashion a skirt into a t-shirt very soon.

While you wait, do yourself a favor and go grab the new Union St. Tee pattern.

That link to the Union St. Tee is an affiliate link because we think that it’s the greatest thing since sliced bread and you really, really should try it out!  If you click on our link, we might make a few pennies which we will immediately turn around and spend on more modal fabric.  It won’t cost you any extra of course.  You’ve been warned!

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Chevron Baby Quilt {My Sister’s Quilts #14}

Chevron baby quilt by Skirt Fixation

My Sister's Quilts series

If this is the first time you’re seeing this series, My Sister’s Quilts is the mini quilting memoirs of my sister who is a fantastic quilter and has made baby quilts for each of her 17 nieces and nephews.  Today she’s showing you a chevron baby quilt.

Chevron baby quilt by Skirt Fixation

I unfortunately do not have much memory at all of making this quilt, which is odd, being that it is the most recent one that I have made!  I recognize the fabrics from many other quilts I have made.

Chevron baby quilt by Skirt Fixation

It is a glorious thing when a quilter has a large enough stash that there is no need set foot inside a fabric store!  When we moved about a month ago I was reminding myself and my husband  that a sizable fabric stash is a GOOD thing, as we moved tub-upon-tub-upon-tub from our old basement to the trailer, then from the trailer to the new house, and finally to the new basement.  🙂

Chevron baby quilt by Skirt Fixation
I do remember wanting to make a chevron quilt, and I loved how this turned out looking like the mountains reaching from the sea to the sky!
Chevron baby quilt by Skirt Fixation
If I were to name this quilt, I think I would call it “Sunrise in the Mountains.”   As naturalist and environmental philosopher John Muir stated, “How glorious a greeting the sun gives the mountains.”  In my opinion there is not much that is more amazing than on this earth than experiencing the crisp morning air in the mountains.
Chevron baby quilt by Skirt Fixation
My family holds in our hearts a special love for the mountains.  Mountains remind us of beauty, adventure, and love for one we have lost, but will never forget…
Chevron baby quilt by Skirt Fixation
My nephew L. will soon be climbing mountains in great strides and it is my wish that every one of his sunrises may hold promises, and that every one of his sunsets may hold peace.
Chevron baby quilt by Skirt Fixation
Love Aunt Fessy
When my sister gave us this quilt, I remember she called it a time capsule of sorts.  It both represented the chevron trend, and showed the process of time and sewing with all the fabrics from different quilts she’s made.  We are so thankful for an amazing seamstress in our family with the love for quilting and the heart to gift quilts to each of her nieces and nephews!   This is the end of this series, for now…but as soon as Aunt Fessy has another baby quilt sewn, we’ll be back! 
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Contrast Hood Binding Tutorial

Today we’ve got a quick and easy tutorial for you on how to make a contrast hood binding.  This is a fun way to make the inside of the hood pop!  You can use plain fabric for the outside and a pop of print for the inside, or print for the outside and a coordinating pop of solid color for the contrast hood binding and inside.  Or print for both.  Or plain for both!  Let’s get started.

Contrast Hood Binding tutorial from Skirt Fixation

First you need to cut 2 of each hood piece.  (If your hood pattern is lined like the one I used, the Rosemary Raglan affiliate link, just cut and sew as instructed.)  When both your outer and inner hoods are assembled, here’s the fast and easy way to create that contrast hood binding.

Contrast Hood Binding tutorial from Skirt Fixation

Contrast Hood Binding Step 1:

Cut 1 inch off the outer hood along the front edge.  (Most hoods are generously sized, and they will still cover the head adequately after doing this.  But if you are concerned about the size of the hood, you can ADD 1 inch to the front edge of the inner hood as you are cutting it out.

Contrast Hood Binding tutorial from Skirt Fixation

Contrast Hood Binding Step 2:

Place the inner hood over the outer hood, right sides together.  Line up the front edges, even though the hoods are now different sizes.

 

Contrast Hood Binding tutorial from Skirt FixationContrast Hood Binding Step 3:

Sew the front edges together.

Contrast Hood Binding tutorial from Skirt Fixation

Contrast Hood Binding Step 4:

Turn the hood right sides out, and roll the inner hood out along the front edge.  See, instant contrast hood binding.

Contrast Hood Binding tutorial from Skirt Fixation

Contrast Hood Binding Step 5:

To keep the inner fabric from rolling back to the inside, topstitch along the outer hood fabric, just inside the seam line.

Now you can create a contrast hood binding on all your hoodies!  We’d love to see your completed garment if you use our tutorial…leave us a comment below, or send us an email: skirtfixation@gmail.com

To see the fabric sources and the matching hoodie I sewed for myself, head over to CaliFabrics!

Contrast Hood Binding tutorial from Skirt Fixation

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Copycat Velvet Alexander McQueen Skirt {Buy or DIY}

Copycat velvet Alexander McQueen skirt by Skirt Fixation

Today we have another Buy or DIY skirt for you!   Since velvet is all the rage, but the price of a velvet skirt will make you rage, we’re going to show you how to make a copycat velvet Alexander McQueen skirt for way, way less.  Let’s just say your rage will turn to smug glee!

Copycat velvet Alexander McQueen skirt by Skirt Fixation

Copycat velvet Alexander McQueen skirt Details:

Velvet Midi skirt: Alexander McQueen for Nordstrom

Fabric Recommendation: Stretch Velvet Wine Fabric

Pattern Recommendation: Tilly and the Buttons Dominique Skirt

Copycat velvet Alexander McQueen skirt Math:

Alexander McQueen for Nordstrom velvet skirt: $575

Fabric needed: 1.5 yards

Pattern: $11.03

Fabric: $9.98 per yard

Notions: $3.59 Knit Non-Roll Elastic

Total Cost: $29.59 for DIY

Total Savings: $545.41

Wow, the DIY wins again!!  Are you seeing a pattern here?  We love showing you how easy it is to look fashionable and follow the latest skirt trends without breaking the bank.  We hope we’ve convinced you with this copycat velvet Alexander McQueen Buy or DIY skirt edition.  Check out all our Buy or DIY skirt posts, they’re so fun and save you so much money!

Speaking of saving money, some affiliate links are used in this post.  All that means is that if you use one of our links, we might make a few pennies at no extra cost to you.  And of course we’ll save our money to buy more fabric and patterns and blogging about it!

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10 Super Easy Last Minute Skirt Costume Ideas

10 skirt costumes you can make in 1 hour or less!

Today we’ve got a round up of 10 super duper easy, last minute skirt costume ideas you can pull together in an hour or less!

#1:  Check out our fast refashioned German Gretl skirt costume from the Sound Of Music.

#2  This Cleopatra costume is a refresher of a previous year’s costume with a skirt, tips in this post.

#3  Take full advantage of lesser used items like leotards and petticoats like in this ballerina costume.

#4:  Just one special clothing items and the right accessories can turn plain clothes (like a black skirt and white shirt) into a super fun costume like this Scandinavian girl skirt costume.

$5:  Grab a denim skirt and some items from someone else’s closet for this quick and easy cowgirl costume.

#6:  Start with a skirt, add layers of scarves and a ribbon around the head makes an instant gypsy skirt costume like this one.

#7:  A black skirt and some white paint and our free stencils, and the wearer is an instant game of chess!  Favorite skirt costume ever!

#8:  No sewing, just the right accessories for this little huntress skirt costume.

#9:  Every little girl will want a Disney princess costume at least once in her life, right?  Here’s a fast tutorial to make her into a princess, and leaves you with a skirt for everyday wear when it’s all over.

#10:  And there’s always the ever famous 50s poodle skirt costume!  Add saddle shoes, and the costume is complete!  This one was actually sewn by my Mom, and all the girls have worn it, for dress up, costumes, and just fun.

10 skirt costumes you can make in 1 hour or less!

All right, leave us a comment (we love them!)  What was your favorite costume ever that involved a skirt?

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Lanes and Lapses

Lane Raglan with FBA sewn by Skirt Fixation

It’s been a while since we posted, probably our biggest lapse so far!  But we’ve been so super busy we haven’t had time to blog.  Never fear, we’ve been sewing and skirting and so on…

Lane Raglan with FBA sewn by Skirt Fixation

Another lapse you may or may not have noticed was the amount of sewing that has been happening for Allegra.  Well, today we’re over at CaliFabrics, taking care of that little problem, and explaining why it happened.  So that’s something, right?

And just as soon as we can, we’ll share more sewing and what the lapse is all about!  If you want to see behind the scenes sewing and sneak peeks, follow us on Instagram.

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2 Lane Raglans for Fall (and a surprise…)

Knit Camden Raglan sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

Recently Mountain Maker Fabrics had a Lane Raglan sew along.  And if you’ve been here any time at all, you know our love for the Lane Raglan and all Hey June Patterns.  If you haven’t, it’s huge.  Glacial.  Of course we couldn’t miss the chance to make another Lane Raglan.  Or two.  Plus a Camden Raglan which is the Lane’s little sister pattern.

French Terry Lane Raglan sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

First of all we have a French Terry Lane Raglan hoodie with thumbholes and hood.  This fabric is Purple Tie Dye French Terry from Girl Charlee, and super duper soft and drapey.  I sewed this up for Aria last weekend when she was out of town as a surprise.

French Terry Lane Raglan sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

After all my hard work, I rewarded myself by trying it on…and decided it that Aria probably wasn’t going to get a new Lane Raglan hoodie for fall after all!  (If you stick around to the end of the post, you can find out if I relented to her begging once she returned or not!)  The only modification I made was to cut on the long sleeve line even though I was adding cuffs.

Bamboo knit Lane Raglan sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

Next I sewed myself a plain as can be boring old black long sleeved Lane Raglan that I’ll probably wear at least 2x per week this winter!  That’s what’s known as a staple garment.

Bamboo knit Lane Raglan sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

The fabric is a super soft, lightweight and drape-y rayon bamboo blend.  It’s sold out over at CaliFabrics where I got it, but you can find it here: Telio Stretch Bamboo Rayon Jersey Knit Black Fabric

Knit Camden Raglan sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

And last, but the one you’ve been waiting to see is the Camden Raglan I sewed for Annie.  As I wrote in my Instagram post (you can follow us for sneak peeks and more!) I made the mistake of letting her choose any fabric she wanted from the stash.

Knit Camden Raglan sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

She zoomed right in on this Art Gallery Inblue Jersey Knit Bloesem Dark Fabric.  I only had 1 yard, and this time I’m making her the size 8 instead of 6 like last year, but even with the hood and thumbhole options I managed to eek it out!  At such a young, tender age, she sure has learned which fabrics are the best quality, don’t pill, and are super comfortable to wear!

Knit Camden Raglan sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

The lace pocket idea was stolen from Sew Sophie Lynn.  She added a lace pocket to one of her shirts, and everything else she does is pretty cool too!  Annie said to me, after she tried it on for the 1st time, “I don’t remember discussing the lace pocket, but it’s pretty so thanks for adding it!!!”

Knit Camden Raglan sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

The thumbhole cuff instructions are not included with the Camden Raglan, but you can use the ones from the Lane Raglan, and it works great!

Knit Camden Raglan sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

These Lane Raglans could pretty much be sewn in an assembly line process, with a few thread changes for the black one.  It wasn’t too hard, and now we’ve each got a new shirt for fall and winter.  And yes, that’s Aria behind that hood.  I relented!

French Terry Lane Raglan sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

Affiliate links are used in this post because sadly, fabric is not free!  And if you click on one of our affiliate links, we just may make a few pennies at no extra cost to you…so thanks!

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Asian Inspired Baby Quilt {My Sister’s Quilts #11-13!}

Asian inspired baby quilt

My Sister's Quilts series

If this is the first time you’re seeing this series, My Sister’s Quilts is the mini quilting memoirs of my sister who is a fantastic quilter and has made baby quilts for each of her 17 nieces and nephews.  Today she’s showing you an Asian inspired baby quilt.

Asian inspired baby quilt

O’s quilt was made in assembly line with 2 other quilts!  My husband’s sister had twins born in South Africa around a similar time, so I made three quilts at once!

Asian inspired baby quilt

It is fun now too to think of the 3 quilts on separate corners of the world, and with the  Asian theme of the fabric, it all feels so international!

 Asian inspired baby quilt
This was a fun project.  I love how the bold colors came together.
Asian inspired baby quilt
O. has such a gentle nature that the dragons hardly seem fitting for him now.  Perhaps though there is a comparison.
Asian inspired baby quilt
Some are graceful enough to carry a fire within themselves which, instead of being a danger, it instead represents itself as courage and kindness, warming the hearts of all those around them.  This is O!
Asian inspired baby quilt
Thanks, Aunt Fessy!  My favorite thing about this quilt is the red thread used for quilting!  It adds such a bold flair to an already bold quilt.  We’re nearing the end of this baby quilt series, and I’m really going to miss seeing all these beautiful and creative quilts!
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Parachute Polo Dresses

Parachute Polo shirt pattern made into dresses by Skirt Fixation

Everyone here is so excited about today’s post!  You see, when Baby was born and she was a girl, Annie got all excited about matching with her little sister!

Parachute Polo shirt pattern made into dresses by Skirt Fixation

I’ve sewn these 2 girls a couple of matching dresses using scraps from dresses I’d already sewn for Annie.  But this was the 1st time we got to PLAN and EXECUTE on the matching dresses theme!

Parachute Polo shirt pattern made into dresses by Skirt Fixation

We started with the Parachute Polo Shirt pattern by Oliver+S and made Parachute Polo Dresses.  We happen to have both size ranges of this pattern since we’ve been sewing it up for the boys.  And so we made a 12 month size for Baby and a size 8 for Annie.

Parachute Polo shirt pattern made into dresses by Skirt Fixation

To make Baby’s Parachute Polo Shirt into a dress, we just added a gathered rectangle at the bottom.

Parachute Polo shirt pattern made into dresses by Skirt Fixation

Annie’s was a little more difficult, because we wanted to go a little longer with it.  We used the same general idea as this tutorial from Oliver+S but made 2 tiers instead of 3.  As an added benefit, there is another layer to the skirt part of the dress, due to the striped fabric being semi-sheer.

Parachute Polo shirt pattern made into dresses by Skirt Fixation

One thing I did different form the pattern was to use knit fabric for the collar and placket instead of woven as suggested.  There reason is that the Parachute Polo Shirt’s we’ve made for the boys require pressing of the collar after washing, and the knit won’t need it!  Because it’s interfaced, it still stands up nicely though.

Parachute Polo shirt pattern made into dresses by Skirt Fixation

The fabric is from Girl Charlee.  It’s currently sold out, but if you love wide stripes like I do, you might try this one.

Parachute Polo shirt pattern made into dresses by Skirt Fixation

Since this fabric was lighter weight, and I didn’t want to bother with hemming, I only hemmed the bottom of the dresses, and left the sleeves and Annie’s upper tier unhemmed.  Knits for the win!

Parachute Polo shirt pattern made into dresses by Skirt Fixation

In a fun little challenge for myself, I not only matched the stripes at the side seams, but I matched the buttons to the stripes!  I considered contrast buttons, or a colored button, but I really wanted the silhouettes of these dresses to shine.

Parachute Polo shirt pattern made into dresses by Skirt Fixation

Baby and Annie had so much fun with this Parachute Polo dresses photo shoot!  They couldn’t stop giggling and laughing and playing!

Parachute Polo shirt pattern made into dresses by Skirt Fixation

It’s going to be so fun sewing for these girls in the next few years.

Parachute Polo shirt pattern made into dresses by Skirt Fixation

Leave us a comment…what do you think about dressing kids in matching clothing?

Parachute Polo shirt pattern made into dresses by Skirt Fixation