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Rosemary Raglan Pattern Review

Rosemary Raglan sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

We bought the Rosemary Raglan pattern before our baby girl was born, that’s how much we loved it at first sight!  Since the pattern is for sizes 3 months to 12 years, we could make the pattern for Annie for a few more years anyway.

Rosemary Raglan sewn and review by Skirt Fixation

There are so many fun possibilities for fabric combinations and colors with this pattern.  For the Rosemary Raglan you see here, we used Bolt by Girl Charlee Homestead Life Jersey Knit Bluebird Garden Rose Fabric.  The brown stripe fabric is leftover from this skirt, and it’s inside the hood too.

Rosemary Raglan sewn and review by Skirt Fixation

The Rosemary Raglan pattern was easy to sew, and the instructions were complete and thorough, just like all Peekaboo Pattern Shop patterns we’ve sewn.  It’s going to be so fun to sew this pattern for Baby (and Annie!) for years to come.

Rosemary Raglan sewn and review by Skirt Fixation

These photos were actually taken in May, and Baby has already outgrown this (and the other 2) Rosemary Raglan tops I sewed for her.  This was the only one I included the hood option.  You can see the other 2 in this Instagram post.

Rosemary Raglan sewn and review by Skirt Fixation

Now that the fall is approaching, I’m ready to do some fall sewing again…and that is going to include some more Rosemary Raglans for Baby!  I love the raglan sleeves in baby size!

Rosemary Raglan sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

This pattern can also be sewn without the peplum, if desired.  There are 2 sleeve lengths, short, 3/4, and long.  So technically I could have made some of these for Baby to wear all summer!

Rosemary Raglan sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

One thing that is going to be very handy about dressing Baby in Rosemary Raglans this fall is ease of crawling.  Since she has ALREADY stared scooching, we can easily see that skirts and dresses hinder her mobility.  That’s okay, it just means I get to to more scrap busting and whip out a whole bunch of Rosemary Raglans for her to wear this fall!

Rosemary Raglan sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

It’s fun to look back at these photos and see how much Baby has changed in just a few short months!  Her hair has lightened to a coppery color for one thing!

Rosemary Raglan sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

She still is enthralled with any sibling who comes near…in these photos, Annie was just out of the shot, interacting with Baby and getting her to smile!

Rosemary Raglan sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

Affiliate links are used in this post to adorably cute fabric and patterns!  We’re delighted to share these resources with you, and you should be aware that if you click on one of our affiliate links, you might end up owning some really cute products too!  And we might just make a few pennies at no extra cost to you, so thanks!

Rosemary Raglan sewn and reviewed by Skirt Fixation

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Ikea Fabric Baby Quilt {My Sister’s Quilts #10}

Ikea fabric baby quilt

My Sister's Quilts series

If this is the first time you’re seeing this series, My Sister’s Quilts is the mini quilting memoirs of my sister who is a fantastic quilter and has made baby quilts for each of her 17 nieces and nephews.

Ikea fabric baby quilt
I found the fabric for this quilt at IKEA in London, and instantly knew I had to use it to make something!  Then I had a darling little nephew arrive and it seemed like a perfect fit!
Ikea fabric baby quilt I simplified the blocks to create a bold pattern to echo the viking theme.  Things came together quickly to create one of my favorite quilts.  (oh whoops, I think that I have said before that certain quilts were my favorite!)
Ikea fabric baby quilt
I love how the backing fabric and the quilting pattern combined to mimic waves of a sea.
Ikea fabric baby quilt
The vikings did not shy away from the stormy sees, but instead they demonstrated their strength and proved their power by setting sail in the midst of the storms.  Because they took hold of opportunities when others were more inclined to take shelter, they became mighty conquerors despite rough waters.
Ikea fabric baby quilt
And my dear nephew, in our ever changing and challenging world, I wish for you the same! May your ship be sound, your anchor be strong, and your influence be far reaching!
 Ikea fabric baby quilt
Love Aunt Fessy
I’ve always marveled how my sister can match a quilt to the personality of a baby she’s not yet met, and how the baby grows up to fulfill that quilted personality!  Does that make any sense?  Whatever, the case, however it works, David sure loves his baby quilt from Aunt Fessy!
Ikea fabric baby quilt
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Red Buy or DIY Denim Skirt

Buy or DIY Denim Skirt by Skirt Fixation

It’s time for another Buy or DIY skirt!  When Hey June Patterns released a denim skirt pattern, we were so excited!  We’ve already sewn our first Sandbridge Skirt, and we’ll be sharing and reviewing it soon, but today we’re going to show you how much you can save with a DIY denim skirt for less!

Buy or DIY Denim Skirt by Skirt Fixation

Buy or DIY Denim Skirt Details:

Frame Le Color Pencil Denim Skirt from Orchard Mile

Fabric Recommendation: Art Gallery Textured Denim Solid Scarlet Brick Fabric

Pattern Recommendation: Hey June Sandbridge Skirt

Buy or DIY Denim Skirt Math:

Frame Le Color Pencil Denim Skirt: $225 retail price.

Fabric needed: 1.5 yards

Pattern: $10

Fabric: $13.98 per yard

Notions: $6.11 denim zipper

$3.07 dungaree button

Total Cost: $40.15 for DIY

Total Savings: $184.85

Buy or DIY Denim Skirt Conclusion

Wow, the DIY wins again!!  Are you seeing a pattern here?  (See what we did there?!)  We are going to grant you that it takes more time to DIY a denim skirt than to buy one.  But you definitely won’t end up with the same satisfaction level!  So now we are totally in the mood to replicate this exact skirt!  Let us know about your great DIY denim skirt, or any DIY skirt savings!

Affiliate links are used in this post.  Be forewarned if you click on our links, you just might find yourself the new owner of some really great products!  And we might make a few pennies at no additional cost to you.

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Tips for sewing double brushed poly fabric

Tips for sewing double brushed poly fabric on a regular sewing machine

Recently I’ve had fun working with a new kind of fabric.  Double brushed poly fabric is a knit polyester fabric that has been brushed on both sides, making it super soft to wear, but a little tricky to work with.

Tips for sewing double brushed poly fabric on a regular sewing machine

Before I started sewing with double brushed poly fabric, I researched it a little bit.  I concluded that if you have a serger you will have almost no trouble sewing with double brushed poly fabric.  Since I didn’t sew either of the shirts in this post with a serger (because I don’t HAVE one!) I’ll give you some tips I’ve picked up along the way about sewing double brushed poly fabric with a regular sewing machine.

Tips for sewing double brushed poly fabric on a regular sewing machine

Double brushed poly fabric has a 4 way stretch that is greater than 100% and it has good recovery, which means it’s very forgiving to sew with.  It also has beautiful drape so there are many garments that look quite lovely sewn up with double brushed poly.

Tips for sewing double brushed poly fabric on a regular sewing machine

Quite a few seamstresses used double brushed poly fabric to make leggings, which is what I used it for my 1st time working with it.  This fabric is 96% polyester, which the name indicates, and can be a little too hot to wear as a fitted garment in the summer.  The other 4% is spandex.  Some have found that looser, breezier garments from double brushed poly fabric work great in the heat.  Personally, I’ve worn these 2 tops all summer with no trouble.

Tips for sewing double brushed poly fabric on a regular sewing machine

My biggest tip for sewing with double brushed poly fabric on a regular sewing machine is to use the right needle.  A new stretch or ballpoint needle will help your machine NOT skip stitches.

My 2nd tip is to use the right thread.  I had much better luck with 100% polyester thread than cotton or even a cotton/polyester blend.

My 3rd tip is to use the right stitch.  My machine has a stretch stitch which worked great for straight seams.  (You can also use a narrow zigzag stitch.)

The next tip is that if your machine starts skipping stitches (which seems to be the biggest problem when sewing with double brushed poly fabric) stop!  Rethread both the bobbin and the main thread, and try again.

Tips for sewing double brushed poly fabric on a regular sewing machine

And finally, a tip few tips for hemming double brushed poly fabric:

use a double needle (or zigzag stitch,)

a longer stitch length (I used about 3.5)

some Lite EZ-Steam II fusible tape inside the hems

I also buried the ends of the thread inside my seams so they didn’t come unraveled.  This means I had to hem the sleeves and bottom before I sewed the side seams.  But it works great, and in almost 3 months of wearing, no popped hems!

Tips for sewing double brushed poly fabric on a regular sewing machine

Pink shirt details:

Pattern source: Hey June Handmade Union St Tee

Fabric source:  Raspberry Creek Fabrics (no longer available, but a nice selection of double brushed poly fabric)

Blue shirt details:

Pattern source: Hey June Handmade Lane Raglan

Fabric source:  CaliFabrics (no longer available, but a nice selection of double brushed poly fabric)

Tips for sewing double brushed poly fabric on a regular sewing machine

Affiliate links are used in the post to some really good products!  Be warned that if you click through our links you might also be the proud owner of really awesome patterns and fabric!  And also, we might make a few pennies to be able to support this blogging habit we have!

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My Grace Tankini Swimsuits

Grace Tankini by Savvy Patterns

I realized I never showed some of the Grace Tankinis that I made while the pattern was in testing and production.  All of the muslins (practice and test) suits that I made were from a pastel purple check fabric.  A friend had given me about 9 yards of it, and it worked perfectly for checking the fit and assembly steps.  But then I wanted some suits I could wear!

Grace Tankini by Savvy Patterns

This 1st example of the Grace Tankini is view B top and ruched sport skirt.  The solid navy fabric is from JoAnn Fabrics and was labeled swimwear/athleticwear.  It wasn’t as nice and thick to work with as later fabrics suits.  The skirt is the view B skirt, and the inset ruched panel fabric is from The Fabric Fairy.  I left off the pockets in this skirt.

Grace Tankini by Savvy Patterns

The next example is the view A top and circle skirt bottom.  This swimwear fabric came from Imagine Gnats and is of medium thickness and easy to work with.  The skirt is a full circle, and so fun to wear and has nice coverage.

Grace Tankini by Savvy Patterns

Third, I sewed a view B top and high waisted, ruched skirt bottom.  These fabrics came from CaliFabrics, and were the thickest and nicest to work with.  You could make an unlined tankini with this thick fabric.  You might notice the high waisted version on this sport skirt has a wider waistband, which was an early version of the high waisted bottoms.

Grace Tankini by Savvy Patterns

And finally, I sewed a view A top and plain sport skirt with pockets.  The star fabric for the top is from CaliFabrics, and the striped fabric for the skirt is from Hancock Fabrics closeout sale.  They were both nice, thick, good quality fabrics to work with.

Grace Tankini by Savvy Patterns

You might think 4 swimsuits is too many, but considering Aria and I share most clothes, I suspect she’ll be wearing these also.  All these photos were taken at my sister-in-law’s pool…isn’t is beautiful?

Grab your copy of the Grace Tankini here.

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View B Ruched Tankini Sew Along

Ruched tankini sew along

Today we’re going to sew the ruched tankini front panel on View B of the Grace Tankini.  This is the part that gets the most questions, so we thought a photo tutorial would be helpful.  It’s worth it to make the ruched panel on View B…it’s many people’s favorite part about this view!

Ruched tankini sew along

Step 1:

Cut out the front panel.  As suggested in the Grace Tankini pattern, do not cut it out on the fold, but open up your fabric, cut 1/2 of the piece, flip the pattern piece over and cut the other half.

Ruched tankini sew along

Step 2:

After sewing the gathering stitches on the sides of the ruched front panel, gather it.  It is helpful to lay out your side piece to see how far to gather the front panel.  Start the gathers at the dot, below the notch where the top of the side panel goes.

As stated in the pattern, you can concentrate the ruching wherever you want to!  More ruching=minimization of that area.  Try to keep the gathers even from side to side so they don’t slant diagonally across your body.  End the gathers 1/5” above the bottom of the front panel so it doesn’t sag down across the bottom.  (Apologies for the blurriness of this photo.  It’s the only one I ended up with!)

You can see how I’ve pinned down my side piece to keep it from moving as I gathered the front panel.  When you are finished gathering, the bottom of the front and side will line up.  The top of the side piece will be at the notch of the front panel.

Ruched tankini sew along

Step 3:

Once the front panel is the same length as the side panel (from the notch to the hem,) pin them right sides together.  Gently curve the shape of the front panel and the side piece to match up.

Ruched tankini sew along

Step 4:

Sew the front panel and side piece together.  We’ve found it more helpful to have the ruched front panel down against the feed dogs to help pull the gathers along evenly.

There you have it!  Continue with the instructions to make the rest of the Grace Tankini.

Ruched tankini sew along

Grab your copy of the Grace Tankini here.

Fabric used in this tutorial is from CaliFabrics.

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Sewing the Circle Cut Out in the Grace Tankini

How to sew the circle cut out in the back of your Grace Tankini pattern.

We’ve got a tutorial for you about sewing a circle cut out in the back of the Grace Tankini for View A.  This part is not hard at all and adds such fun to the back!

How to sew the circle cut out in the back of your Grace Tankini pattern.

You could actually use the back pattern piece to add a circle cut out to the back of View B also.  Or use a CD and place it in the center back (between the shoulder blades) of your favorite swimsuit pattern, and use this tutorial to add a circle cut out to the back of your swimsuit!  Once you have cut out the pattern pieces of both your main fabric and your lining or shelf bra, follow this photo tutorial.

How to sew the circle cut out in the back of your Grace Tankini pattern.

Step 1:

Line up the two circles and pin.  The right side of your main fabric will be facing up, and the wrong side of your shelf bra or lining will be facing up.  In other words, right sides together!

How to sew the circle cut out in the back of your Grace Tankini pattern.

Step 2:

Carefully sew around the edges of the circle, using a 1/2” seam allowance.  Stop and adjust the fabric as needed.  It’s easiest if you put your needle down in the fabric and adjust the layers.  Alternately, you can baste, check it, and then sew.  If your fabric is thin and doesn’t have good stability, you might try marking the circle onto the back of the fabric and sewing this step before cutting out the fabric from in the middle.  This will ensure your circle doesn’t end up stretched out of shape.

How to sew the circle cut out in the back of your Grace Tankini pattern.

Step 3:

Snip around the circle, up to but NOT through your line of stitches you just sewed.  This will allow the circle to lay flat.  I’ve found using just the tip of a sharp scissors to be the key here.

How to sew the circle cut out in the back of your Grace Tankini pattern.

Here’s a close up so you can tell how close to go to the stitched circle.

How to sew the circle cut out in the back of your Grace Tankini pattern.

Step 4:

Pull your lining or shelf bra through the hole so it is now on the wrong side of the swimsuit back where it belongs.  Carefully press around the circle to get it to lay flat.

How to sew the circle cut out in the back of your Grace Tankini pattern.

Step 5:

Sew around the circle again with a 1/4” – 3/8” seam allowance.  As you sew, you want to gently roll the lining/shelf bra to the underside so it doesn’t show on the right side when you are finished.

How to sew the circle cut out in the back of your Grace Tankini pattern.

And there you have it!  In the above photo you can see the inside and outside of the circle cut out.  Your circle cut out in the back of a swimsuit is completely finished!  Bring on the sun…

How to sew the circle cut out in the back of your Grace Tankini pattern.

 

Grab your copy of the Grace Tankini here.

Fabric used in this tutorial is from CaliFabrics.

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Button Up to Baby Dress {Handmade Baby}

And then we couldn't help ourselves...we had to make a second dress using this pattern!

One thing we want to highlight in the course of our Handmade Baby series is how easy it is to refashion for a baby!  You can use larger garments as (pre-sewn) fabric, and still take advantage of some of their existing elements.  Today’s post is a perfect example of refashioning clothes for a baby.

From button up to baby dress! A cute tutorial from Skirt Fixation.

Mr. Skirt Fixation cleaned out his closet of button up shirts again, and this time our new baby was the beneficiary!  Men’s button up shirts usually good quality.  This shirt was made from seersucker fabric, perfect to refashion into a baby girl dress for summer.

From button up to baby dress! A cute tutorial from Skirt Fixation.

We used the Brooklyn Pattern Co. Franklin Dress pattern.  Last time we sewed this we made it into a top for Annie.  Since this pattern starts at size 6 months, it was a perfect choice.  The elements of the men’s button up shirt that we took advantage of for this refashion were the back hem (notice how it’s scooped?)  Also, we kept the sleeve hems and just added elastic to them.  Of course, we took advantage of the button placket, and extended it all the way down the front of the dress.  And we just had to keep the pocket from the front of the shirt on the skirt of the dress.

From button up to baby dress! A cute tutorial from Skirt Fixation.No hemming was required on the back of the dress and the sleeves, plus we didn’t have to make the button plackets.  This made refashioning clothes for a baby faster and easier than if we had not used Daddy’s button up shirt!

 

From button up to baby dress! A cute tutorial from Skirt Fixation.

And then we couldn’t help ourselves…we had to make a second dress using this pattern!  The pin tucks and addition of piping are so darling in the tiniest sizes!

From button up to baby dress! A cute tutorial from Skirt Fixation.

We made only one change to the (not refashioned) dress.  We shortened the sleeves to just above the elbow length.  I guess adding piping to the yoke bottom isn’t written into the pattern, but it’s hardly a change…just an addition!

And then we couldn't help ourselves...we had to make a second dress using this pattern!

We used Art Gallery Forest Floor Clover Grove Whisper Fabric for this dress and a matching diaper cover.  (The diaper cover goes well with both dresses.)

And then we couldn't help ourselves...we had to make a second dress using this pattern!

The diaper cover pattern is free from Made Everyday.

And then we couldn't help ourselves...we had to make a second dress using this pattern!

Look how darling this dress is with other items made from the Forest Floor Fabrics line.  You might have noticed we had JUST enough material left from the men’s button up shirt to make a contrasting yoke inside this second dress!

And then we couldn't help ourselves...we had to make a second dress using this pattern!

Baby is getting super wiggly for her big sister to hold sometimes!  Nevertheless, we managed to grab a few modeled shots of the dress on Baby.

And then we couldn't help ourselves...we had to make a second dress using this pattern!

Leave us a comment…what is your favorite thing to refashion for a baby?

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Quilt Market 2017

Skirt Fixation at Quilt Market 2017

Skirt Fixation at Quilt Market 2017

In May I had the awesome opportunity to explore Quilt Market for a few hours thanks to the generous ladies at Simple Simon and Co.  I had been wanting to meet liZ and Elizabeth for years, and finally got the opportunity.  Quilt Market is a trade-only show for the quilting/fabric industry.  So you can see how I was like a child in a candy store as I walked around with liZ.

Skirt Fixation at Quilt Market 2017

liZ and Elizabeth had a booth showcasing their new Just Add Sugar fabric line.  They won the top prize at Quilt Market for best single booth award, and you can see why!  Their booth was  LOADED with fruit (which they brought in their suitcases all the way from Utah to St. Louis!!!)  The booth just exploded with color and sweetness.  The table was set for 6 and piled high with fruit, flowers, and of course their new fabric!  I even got to record on video their reaction when they were presented the best single booth award.

Skirt Fixation at Quilt Market 2017

Because there were hundreds of booths at Quilt Market and I only had a few hours, I had to be selective in what I saw.  With careful planning and the ever generous Simple Simon and Co. ladies, I made it to my top 5 destinations!

Skirt Fixation at Quilt Market 2017

Since I had chosen to wear my Runway Skirt made from Art Gallery Fabrics designed by April Rhodes, I had to see the Art Gallery Fabrics booths and meet April.  She was there displaying her new Arizona After and Heritage fabric lines, and they are both amazing.  Her booth was fantastic, and had a quiet peaceful atmosphere in the middle of the very bustling Quilt Market.

You might notice I also dressed Baby in an Art Gallery Fabrics dress (blogged here!)  As I walked up to their booth, Walter Bravo (who assists his wife Pat in running Art Gallery Fabrics) held out his arms to me and Baby with delight in his eyes!  We felt like we’d come home!

Skirt Fixation at Quilt Market 2017There were two displays that stopped me in my hasty exploration of Quilt Market and I had to photograph them.  This flower wall made entirely of starched fabric by RJR Fabrics was fantastic.

Skirt Fixation at Quilt Market 2017

Another was this butterfly quilt display.  I don’t even know what to call it.  Let’s call it art!  It was made from the In Bloom fabric collection by Sandra Clemons.

Skirt Fixation at Quilt Market 2017

There are 500 butterflies.  Five. Zero. Zero.  Incidentally, you can buy the pattern to make your own butterflies here.

Skirt Fixation at Quilt Market 2017

Also, I HAD to meet Tula Pink.  Tula is basically a celebrity in the sewing world.  And her fabrics are amazing.  She even has a line of scissors and sewing notions that everyone is gaga over.  But the real reason I wanted to meet Tula was to see which one of us was taller!  I’d only seen photos before, and noticed her height, and was curious.  I’m not spilling the beans, but let’s just say we saw eye to eye about some things!

I also got to meet Alison Glass (who designed the fabric on this skirt) and her assistant Chen.  In a totally unexpected turn of events, I got a signed copy of Blair Stocker’s book Wise Craft Quilts.  And Rebecca Bryan gave me a precut mini charm pack from her new fabric line Panache.   There were so many other people I got to meet and fabrics I got to see and feel, it was incredible!

Skirt Fixation at Quilt Market 2017

Spring Quilt Market 2017 was and amazing experience for me.  I’m so thankful to have experienced it and for liZ and Elizabeth.  Since everyone was so generous to me, I’m holding a giveaway for some of the amazing items I picked up at Quilt Market.  To enter, all you have to do is follow us on Instagram and comment on our giveaway post there.

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Shibori Dye Skirt

Easy cheater method of making a shibori dye skirt by Skirt Fixation

Today I’m going to show you a shibori dye skirt I made a few months ago.  Every year for my birthday, I make myself a new skirt, and this year was no exception!  It’s a way to treat myself with exactly the present I want.

Easy cheater method of making a shibori dye skirt by Skirt Fixation

This year I pulled out one of my favorite skirt patterns, the Syrah Skirt.  You can see our review here, and if you search “Syrah” on this blog you can see all the other versions we’ve made.

Easy cheater method of making a shibori dye skirt by Skirt Fixation

Shibori dying is the method of taking white fabric and indigo dye plus some objects and special folding to make patterns.  Now shibori dyeing is really awesome, and yields amazing results, but if you’re busy, or don’t want to be in danger of a kid reaching into the dye bucket and ending up with blue smeared everywhere, or you just don’t have time, you can use the easy cheater method like we did.  Click this link to buy Indigo Tie Dye fabric from JoAnns.  That’s right.  Pre-dyed fabric.  And done!  Shibori dyeing is really in right now, and I intend to try it myself sometime.  But until then, this fabric will hold me over!

Easy cheater method of making a shibori dye skirt by Skirt Fixation

As you can probably see, this shibori dye skirt ended up a little too long!  I made the same length as the other Syrah Skirts I’ve sewn, but the rayon spandex fabric is quite heavy and pulls this one to a longer length.  In the end I’ll either hem this one shorter, or continue wearing heels with it!

Easy cheater method of making a shibori dye skirt by Skirt Fixation

Speaking of hemming this skirt, I managed to get a beautiful hem by using a stretch twin needle, and this fusible tape.

Easy cheater method of making a shibori dye skirt by Skirt Fixation

To wear with my new skirt, I needed a plain shirt.  I tend to love colors and patterns, and end up with quite a few garments I can’t wear together.  So I made a plain old navy blue Seafarer Top that I wear All. The. Time.  Lesson learned; I need to sew myself more basics.  This lovely navy blue knit fabric is Riley Blake Cotton Jersey Knit Solid Navy Fabric.

Easy cheater method of making a shibori dye skirt by Skirt Fixation

As I say every year about my birthday skirt, I’ve got a new favorite skirt!  Leave me a comment…what do you do to treat yourself on your birthday?

Affiliate links are used in this post because I hope to be able to earn enough money to sew myself a skirt for my birthday next year too!  Help a gal out by clicking on her links…it won’t cost you anything extra, and I might earn a few pennies!